If you were starting a new herd from scratch..

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Warren Allison

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Keeping replacements from that cross or terminal and buying replacements?
Terminal, and buy replacements. The absolute best c ross for maximum hybrid vigor, is Brahma bull on Hereford cow. Whoever raised the F1 Brafords you get, already took advantage of that with the steers. The best 3rd cross on an F1 Braford is Angus/Brangus/Ultrablack. That gives you maximum heterosis on a 3 way cross. Sell those calves, steers and heifers both, and they are gonna top the market. Then buy replacements as you need them.

On the Corrientes, sell heifer and steer calves , weaning them at 6 mos. At that size and age, they will bring you as much as any other commercial black calf of the same size and age. You will only pay $300-$500 for a Corr cow. she will weigh 700# or so. She will wean a 500lb calf in 6 mos that today at the sale would have brought $1.40..$700.00. You don't want to retain these heifers. No point in it, when they can be sold at weaning for more than a cow will cost.
 

Ky hills

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That would be an easier route for me, but I was afraid of birthing problems running a Charolais bull on Angus cows.
Calving issues can happen. I would suggest going with a low bwt calving ease bull especially to start out. It’s my understanding that calving has improved over the years even from when I was involved with them
 

Ebenezer

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I'd re-read the Bonsma info and then begin to seek out cows and bulls. I'd just go straight Angus and not worry about much more. I'd buy heifers from a decent program from the middle of the herd on performance. I'd try to find some aged cows that are fertile and functional to build a base to raise replacement bulls. All of the crossing gets more complicated. Hold down costs and that is where the money is made. As the old saying goes, "It's not what you make, it's what you save".
 

Lee VanRoss

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I am thinking that the management is just as or more important than the color or breed of the cow assuming a selection
of quality within the breed. For instance building a calving barn so you can feel better about calving early will not compute
financially when compared to calving when grass is available. The weaning weight of a dead calf leaves much to be desired
and the mother will most likely move to the negative column for the remainder of the time you own her.

Now all of the above can be thrown out the window if you can latch on to those 700# cows weaning 500# calves in six months.
Good luck with that!
 

kenny thomas

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That would be an easier route for me, but I was afraid of birthing problems running a Charolais bull on Angus cows.
The old fears of calving from a Charolais bull has been gone for many years. They are individuals in every breed that might be a problem but most breeds have taken care of that long ago.
 

HDRider

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The old fears of calving from a Charolais bull has been gone for many years. They are individuals in every breed that might be a problem but most breeds have taken care of that long ago.
Thanks Kenny.

I guess I have an irrational fear of any cross breading on heifers. I started with heifers across the board with no problems using my LBW Angus bull
 

Ky hills

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I like the concept of cross breeding, especially if you are selling all calves at the market. I am still however prefer to breed heifers and especially angus heifers to CE Angus bulls. I have found from limited experience that when crossing heifers of one breed to a different breed, the heterosis does affect BW. CE Angus in most cases are small enough that it doesn’t affect as much, although have had a few big calves.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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ALL BREEDS have easy calving and HARD calving sires out there. Too much emphasis is put on CE for the whole herd. Keep CE high, your WW will go low.
To me, growing out your heifers to a decent size for their breed makes more difference in their ability to calve at 24 months old in BCS of 6.
If you feel the need to get a super CE sire, pick a "spread" bull that has great growth. Lots of them out there - at least in my breed. Have your cake and eat it too.
 
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Pineywoods230

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I like black Brangus cows with a good horned Hereford bull. The heifers won't be worth quite as much as Brahman x Hereford F1's, but there's still a good demand for them, and the steers also sell well, which isn't usually the case with the tiger stripes.
Been considering this cross myself
 

C-Ranch

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I have flip side question for you all!

How many would sale cow herd and just raise hay? For me that means Alfalfa or grass/alfalfa mix depending on if it's being fed to dairy or beef cows.
 
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Pineywoods230

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I have flip side question for you all!

How many would sale cow herd and just raise hay? For me that means Alfalfa or grass/alfalfa mix depending on if it's being fed to dairy or beef cows.
Sad as it is. I made more leasing my place to be cut for hay vs leasing for cattle and them being here all year. But I enjoy having cows around, depends on your preference or if it’s only about the money.
 

Dave

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I would buy older heavy bred cows for a little over kill price. I would do this not too long before your spring grass come on. When grass is done for the year I would empty the pasture. Go on vacation until late winter next year when I would start the process all over again.

C- question. This year might be a good year to sell the cows now. Sell most of the hay in January. Keep enough hay to buy back cows in February. Hay is worth more this year going down the road on a truck than going into a cow.
 

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