I have noticed a new Way to market heifers

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I dunno if it's a good or bad idea or not, but I have watched as the same folks have ads on East Texas CL for about 3 years now, doing the same thing. I have no idea if they are making $$ or not, but it's a different group of cattle every month or so, in the same background photographs, so I know it's the same person.
I just assumed it was someone buying up marginal females at salebarns, then flipping them at higher prices on CL.
 
She has a conscience even for strangers wanting to give her money. She was honest in the add, bull can be rowdy. People calling were not cattle people, some were wanting him with a pet cow. Husband has been shopping around for a bull and decided it was too good a deal for us to pass up, plus it helps our daughter out. Why let her sell a perfectly good bull, when we are shopping for one. We didnt know she had him for sale until she asked her father if he'd go with her to meet up with someone coming to look. When the guy backed out, husband jumped on it. He will go out with a calm older herd, there he'll be ok..And since we know how he acts alone, we have the corrals to deal with it. And, we paid 2500....he'll be worth the same this fall if we decide he's too rowdy for us...
 
wacocowboy":2df22o2y said:
I met a guy earlier this year his main business is heifers. All his heifers are sold before they are even born. People sign contracts to buy all his heifer in one of his 3 herd. They are all F1 crosses he runs like 75 Brahma cows with Hereford bulls and another 75 Brahma cows with Angus bulls and 50 Brahma cows with Char bulls. Most of the heifers go to contract buyers and all the bulls get cut go on oats along with any cull heifers then to feed lots. Pretty impressive operation.
Use to have a similar deal when we raised registered brangus. One of the larger operations bought all the heifers.
 
nothing wrong with selling calves early.i sold a heifer this year when she was less than 2 months old.this is my 2nd year of doing that.the guy that picks the heifers for FFA kids plans on buying heifers from me for meny years to come.
 
cowgirl8":17epsw8m said:
She has a conscience even for strangers wanting to give her money. She was honest in the add, bull can be rowdy. People calling were not cattle people, some were wanting him with a pet cow. Husband has been shopping around for a bull and decided it was too good a deal for us to pass up, plus it helps our daughter out. Why let her sell a perfectly good bull, when we are shopping for one. We didnt know she had him for sale until she asked her father if he'd go with her to meet up with someone coming to look. When the guy backed out, husband jumped on it. He will go out with a calm older herd, there he'll be ok..And since we know how he acts alone, we have the corrals to deal with it. And, we paid 2500....he'll be worth the same this fall if we decide he's too rowdy for us...

Are you concerned that he might pass his temperament on to his calves?
 
Rafter S":32kxqva7 said:
Are you concerned that he might pass his temperament on to his calves?

Not planning on keep any heifers this year, so it wont be a problem for us.
 
LauraleesFarm":9mf76rtv said:
Not one thing wrong with the sale barn. I have bought good cattle at the sale barn and I have sold good cattle there as well. Most of the sellers are smalltime ranchers selling a few head at a time. They have good cattle, but don't want to mess with private sales. People get in a cash crunch they sell a few cows. Couple gets divorced, the cows are sold. Grandpa dies, his cows go to auction. This is the majority of the cattle being sold at the barn.

Private sales are great if you have the time to buy/sale privately. Lots of folks don't have that kind of time, or feel comfortable with it.

When I have done private sales I have had mixed experiences. Some get down to business and buy or don't buy the animal. Others want to ask a jillion dumb questions or they want some sort of iron clad guarantee that the animal is going to be stellar. And when I set a price there is no negotiation. So lowballers really irritate me. And you get a lot of those.

At least with the auction, you know that you got MARKET PRICE for that animal on that day. As high as anyone was willing to bid.

+1. The sale barn works for the seller. More money for you = more money for the sale barn and auctioneers. The auction process is an example of capitalism at work. That is whether an actual physical sale barn or video sales. Most physical auction barns now offer both, where you can watch and bid online from the comfort of your own home :idea:
 
cowgirl8":2wlbpoh3 said:
My daughter tried to sell a bull on craigslist. She got tons of calls, but most were from idiots. Even though they were wanting to buy this bull, she wasnt willing. The bull is mean, he's crazy if you lock him up by himself and some of the people were going to put him on a couple cows in their backyards and had no working pens... He's a nice looking bull, but i was shocked to hear we bought him. He's down at our corral right now and any time you walk by he paws the ground snorting...lol...Oh well..Big bull shortage around us right now. We used this bull last year for free, he's ok in the pasture with cows, just a nut locked up alone. Glad to have a 6 foot metal fence between him and me right now.
We had a group of heifers we culled. Thought about selling them on craigslist as open heifers. ...Someone comes and gets cows from your place and something doesnt go right, they can come back. I've see conversations on FB cow groups where a heifer they bought lost a calf and they blamed it on the seller...Too many noncattle people getting cows right now.

I just can't visualize myself dealing with "noncattle people" seeking to purchase cattle. I just don't see it "here". At least I'm not aware of anyone in my area who fits that description.

If I had a truly crazy bull, I would have no further use for him and I certainly wouldn't want to pass the problem on to someone else either. The bull would earn himself a one way ticket to the slaughter plant via the sale barn. And when checking in, I'd be sure to tell the sale barn guys "Heads up!" :p They have a good crew fully capable of taking it from there.
 
Passing the wild gene on if you keep his heifers would be a concern , A register Brahma Breeder told me years ago to keep a calm herd always cull your cows and Bulls that show any temperament because that trait will be passed on to the off spring, I keep gentle Bulls and I have noticed over the years the heifers I have kept from a high stung cow will pass it on to their off spring. I have a cow now that is gentle in the pasture but you pen her and she is ready to damage.
 
If you are set up right and have experienced cow hands mean bulls are easy to handle. I have dealt with dairy, fighting, rodeo, and just about every breed of beef bulls it is all about knowing how to handle them. I would never sell one to a backyard rancher would hate to find out it hurt them or worse. I just don't buy the passing down of temperament. I have seen the meanest cow I have ever been around produce very calm docile heifers, and I have seen a very gentle bull produce calves that were just itching to get you.
 
I do believe that dispisition is genetic. However just because a cow is high headed doesnt mean her calves will be that way. And one of the meanest bullcalves we ever raised was out of our gentlest pet. So sometimes it is hard to predict.
 
I think temperament in cattle is a combination of genetics and environment (not unlike a lot of human traits). I have a few cows that I bought in 2008 that are still more high-headed than I like, but I haven't noticed any difference in temperament between their calves and those from cows that I raised. With that being said, I wouldn't keep a bull whose attitude I didn't like.
 
In general quality will sell for what it's worth but run of the mill heifers rarely bring a big premium on CL from what I have seen. As far as dealing with city people, I know someone who sold a guy 40 5 weight feeder calves over craigslist and they were his first calves since he moved to his farm. He planned to feed them all the way out. Long story short 3 months later he had a bunch of sickness and lost 15 hd and sued the guy who sold them to him claiming that they got the sick because he hadn't given them the necessary vaccinations when they were younger.
 
Ojp.. I don't see that holding up in court unless he claimed (in writing) that they had been vaccinated. 3 months later especially.


I've seen some darned nice looking animals go through the sale barn here, and it made me wonder why they were there...
I usually don't have enough quality replacement heifers that I would feel good about putting my name behind after I take the few best ones I want.

Temperament is mostly learned, but partly genetic too I think... I know in my one line of cows that were from my first 'pet', they're all much easier to handle, easier to halter break, and I never need to worry about them being mean at calving time.. then there are other lines that just *have* to constantly push, fight and bicker over everything, the ones that grandma, mother, and daughter all have their heads on the wrong side of the fence...
 
cowgirl8":1b04pike said:
Rafter S":1b04pike said:
Are you concerned that he might pass his temperament on to his calves?

Not planning on keep any heifers this year, so it wont be a problem for us.
He wont pass on genes because, we arent keeping heifers this year....
My daughter sold 2 pairs this week. They were cows that every time she got her herd up to work, these 2 would head for the hills. She had moved her herd to her house and these 2 got left at her other place with her bulls. She went to check on them and they were all in the corrals(lucky break). She then brought them to our corrals to hold them until sale day. She got almost 3000 a pair. Calves were small, both under 200. Cows were hard to work with but nice looking. I'm going to guess if there are nice looking animals going through the sale, this might be one reason.
Our heifers go through many trials before they are even put with a bull. We just pulled 11 off our 60 count heifer group because we didnt like how they acted. The ones who act up in the group go first which is at weaning most likely. Each time we work them, we'll pen each one up in a separate lot to look at her by herself. If she acts a fool there, she's out. We're getting too old to deal with rough animals. Back in the 90s we had a limo bull who was the meanest thing ever and everything he produced was mean, sold him and everything that was out of him. Our old red sim bull's heifers are always iffy. Good producers but sometimes goofy, i'd say 50/50...We do have a few of them, we just know to keep an eye on them if they are alone...
Our new bull is quieting down. Husband has been feeding him and standing next to him while he eats, on the other side of the 6ft corral fence of course. Daughters husband works on ranches around here and is a 'cowboy'. Hes rough with stock, i dont really like him helping us when we work cows. He quick to hit, sap and yell..Thats all this bull knows. Maybe around our place he'll settle down some. If not he'll be sold this fall...
 
John SD":490kmkvw said:
I just can't visualize myself dealing with "noncattle people" seeking to purchase cattle. I just don't see it "here". At least I'm not aware of anyone in my area who fits that description. .
May i direct you to the thread about Craigslist cattle for sale. Its a long one.... This will let you know that not only are noncattle people seeking to buy, but they are also seeking to sell....
 
Nesikep":25riglz0 said:
Ojp.. I don't see that holding up in court unless he claimed (in writing) that they had been vaccinated. 3 months later especially.


I've seen some darned nice looking animals go through the sale barn here, and it made me wonder why they were there...
I usually don't have enough quality replacement heifers that I would feel good about putting my name behind after I take the few best ones I want.

Temperament is mostly learned, but partly genetic too I think... I know in my one line of cows that were from my first 'pet', they're all much easier to handle, easier to halter break, and I never need to worry about them being mean at calving time.. then there are other lines that just *have* to constantly push, fight and bicker over everything, the ones that grandma, mother, and daughter all have their heads on the wrong side of the fence...

Contrary to what some think and say, the sale barn is not a dumping off place for junk animals. Realistically it's the only place most small cattle operators have to sell and week in and week out you'll see a lot of really good cattle come through the sale barn.
 
TexasBred":2lc4v01z said:
Contrary to what some think and say, the sale barn is not a dumping off place for junk animals. Realistically it's the only place most small cattle operators have to sell and week in and week out you'll see a lot of really good cattle come through the sale barn.

:nod: While there are a few small cattle operators, i'd say the majority of consignments at sale barns are from longtime reputation consignors who have sold at the same auctions for years. A sale barn simply doesn't market 5-10K head of cattle on sale day, sometimes 2 or 3 days per week in season, from a bunch of part-time operations.
 
Nesikep":1h8c41bh said:
Ojp.. I don't see that holding up in court unless he claimed (in writing) that they had been vaccinated. 3 months later especially.
No it didn't hold up, he didn't have to pay the guy because all he had told them they had been given was a 7-way and the other guy didn't have proof that they had not had that. But it was still a hassle getting a lawyer and going to court and all that.
 
TexasBred":30lrmh8u said:
Nesikep":30lrmh8u said:
Ojp.. I don't see that holding up in court unless he claimed (in writing) that they had been vaccinated. 3 months later especially.


I've seen some darned nice looking animals go through the sale barn here, and it made me wonder why they were there...
I usually don't have enough quality replacement heifers that I would feel good about putting my name behind after I take the few best ones I want.

Temperament is mostly learned, but partly genetic too I think... I know in my one line of cows that were from my first 'pet', they're all much easier to handle, easier to halter break, and I never need to worry about them being mean at calving time.. then there are other lines that just *have* to constantly push, fight and bicker over everything, the ones that grandma, mother, and daughter all have their heads on the wrong side of the fence...

Contrary to what some think and say, the sale barn is not a dumping off place for junk animals. Realistically it's the only place most small cattle operators have to sell and week in and week out you'll see a lot of really good cattle come through the sale barn.

I'm certainly not saying there's no good animals that go through there, it just makes me wonder what the nice looking ones are there for... were they witches at calving?... Look the part but raised a dink?
I saw a old school Simmi cow there, what a tank she was, nothing shy of a full ton, deep, long, and a huge bag. I'd have made money on her the way the market went, I'd have bought her at $70cwt and sold for $140 now, and maybe had a couple good calves.
There were some nice looking young limo cows there, and a gelbvieh weaning heifer that really looked nice, but she was really flighty.

You can get nice stuff at the barn, but there's always a gamble there.



Ojp... it definitely would be a hassle, but I'm glad he didn't have to pay for this.
 

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