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hump backed

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angus9259

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I bought some angus online at a recent dispersal. Got some great cows, some dogs, some in between . . . what you can expect buying on line. Two are hump backed. I know this can be symptom of various illnesses, but they're fine. It's like a perfectly healthy sway backed cow in reverse. I've seen plenty of swayback phenotype in the angus breed, but never hump back. Am I just sheltered and this is a reasonable phenotypical fault or is there something plain wrong here? I'll try to get a picture . . . it's not a rumen hump in the center of the back either . . . . it starts at the tailhead and goes to the front of the shoulders.
 

DOC HARRIS

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Can you post the pedigree's and/or Registeration Number on the individual? What is her age? Is she pregnant, or bred very recently prior to the sale?

DOC HARRIS
 
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angus9259

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DOC HARRIS":xmmjrccl said:
Can you post the pedigree's and/or Registeration Number on the individual? What is her age? Is she pregnant, or bred very recently prior to the sale?

DOC HARRIS

Thanks DOC. She's a BR Midland X 878. She's a coming 3 year old. She's not bred - she calved in March 08 missed her first AI then held over for fall calving. She's cycling fine.
 
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angus9259

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DOC HARRIS":2g7bc3y4 said:
Can you post the pedigree's and/or Registeration Number on the individual? What is her age? Is she pregnant, or bred very recently prior to the sale?

DOC HARRIS


oops . . . the other one is a connealy lead on X BR New Dimension 7127. She's 3 years old just now and will calve in March 09.
 

Marcel

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In my experience, most all hump-backed( roach back) females have experienced foot issues at some point. They develop this posture in an attempt to keep weight off of the injured foot/toe. This may or may not be the case with the two you purchased. Pedigree can point out likely candidates for foot issues. FWIW. Marcel
 

alacattleman

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angus9259":170knxwj said:
I bought some angus online at a recent dispersal. Got some great cows, some dogs, some in between . . . what you can expect buying on line. Two are hump backed. I know this can be symptom of various illnesses, but they're fine. It's like a perfectly healthy sway backed cow in reverse. I've seen plenty of swayback phenotype in the angus breed, but never hump back. Am I just sheltered and this is a reasonable phenotypical fault or is there something plain wrong here? I'll try to get a picture . . . it's not a rumen hump in the center of the back either . . . . it starts at the tailhead and goes to the front of the shoulders.
it's genetic.. you see it alot in dairy cattle, and some of the old framey type beef and dual purpous like simmental.
 
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angus9259

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Marcel":cx7pvz7p said:
In my experience, most all hump-backed( roach back) females have experienced foot issues at some point. They develop this posture in an attempt to keep weight off of the injured foot/toe. This may or may not be the case with the two you purchased. Pedigree can point out likely candidates for foot issues. FWIW. Marcel

"Roach Back" is helpful. That's what it looks like. Thanks for the term.
 
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angus9259

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After reading this thread, my "roach back" doesn't look like this picture. This roach back is more toward the tail head and smooths out toward the shoulder. Mine is a quite uniform curvatures from the tailhead to the front of the shoulder.

viewtopic.php?f=7&t=51578

I'm going to try and get a picture on tomorrow.
 

RD-Sam

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angus9259":cfk57ijw said:
After reading this thread, my "roach back" doesn't look like this picture. This roach back is more toward the tail head and smooths out toward the shoulder. Mine is a quite uniform curvatures from the tailhead to the front of the shoulder.

viewtopic.php?f=7&t=51578

I'm going to try and get a picture on tomorrow.

The roach backed thing could be caused by bad hips, patella, or hock joints. Watch them move and watch all the joints and see if you see anything popping out of place.
 

Beefy

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its just a genetic flaw. used to see it a lot with angus and angus crossed cattle. cows will likely perform alright, i'd send the calves down the road tho. i used to call them "hump backs"
 

LoveMoo11

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I have a cow that is slightly humpbacked due to her being crippled and unable to walk her first few months of life.
 

Keren

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Is that what your cows look like? As much as I dont like foot trimming, perhaps you might want to get them trimmed and see if the roaching/lameness improves. Are they old girls? I put up with having to trim the old old girls (16 yrs plus) once a year but anything more than that I wont tolerate. Have to have the old arthritic bull done once a year so I figure if we put a few of the old cows through its ok. Actually the trimmer charges less if he's got more than one to do :lol2:
 
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angus9259

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Keren":3038qtt2 said:
Is that what your cows look like? As much as I dont like foot trimming, perhaps you might want to get them trimmed and see if the roaching/lameness improves. Are they old girls? I put up with having to trim the old old girls (16 yrs plus) once a year but anything more than that I wont tolerate. Have to have the old arthritic bull done once a year so I figure if we put a few of the old cows through its ok. Actually the trimmer charges less if he's got more than one to do :lol2:

No, they're young but I wonder if that's why they were in the sale. It happens - that's what you get for not being there. They seem healthy in most ways but lameness was probably the heart of the issue. In a way, that's good - if it's not genetic, they could still be used for breeding as long as they don't involve more work (trimming) otherwise they'll have to leave.
 

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