How to use field planters w/ markers

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blackcowz

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Hi all,
A halfway relevant question here I hope. I want to know how, before GPS, you use those field markers that roll on the side of your planter or drill. How do you use the furrow it makes to guide you? Sorry, but this is one question that just bugs me to death and I will be planting fall crops here in a couple days, so I'd like some info.
 

ANAZAZI

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blackcowz":25juafaq said:
Hi all,
A halfway relevant question here I hope. I want to know how, before GPS, you use those field markers that roll on the side of your planter or drill. How do you use the furrow it makes to guide you? Sorry, but this is one question that just bugs me to death and I will be planting fall crops here in a couple days, so I'd like some info.

The line or furrow should be seen in the center of your sight, in the middle of your tractor hood. The line is then to pass between the left and right weel of the tractor and is supposed to be run over by the planter and be replaced with a new one on the side.
 

SRBeef

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First of all, make sure the marker is set properly. Go out in the field and set one down then the other or both down, if your hydraulics allow. There is an extension adjustment on every marker I've seen.

In the US, almost every marker on a planter or drill is intended to put a mark which should be followed with the hood pointer right down the center of the tractor. In Europe the markers are often shorter and intended to place a mark for one of the front tires to run in. This is possible on smaller, open tractors but rarely done in the US. Following is based on US equipment which guides the center of the tractor on the marker mark.

Take a tape measure and make a centerline mark on the frame of the planter.

Calculate the overall planting width = number of rows times the row width. For example 6 rows x 30" row spacing = 180" = 15 ft exactly.

Measure from the centerline on your planter frame out each side to the overall planting width (180" or 15 ft in the example above). THIS is where your marker end disc should be set! Do this for both sides.

On a drill you do the same thing except the row spacing is usually 7.5" or 10".... Is this what you are asking for?

The trick is to keep yourself in the center of the seat when sighting over the hood ornament. Steer the tractor so the hood pointer stays lined up on the mark made on the previous pass.

Good luck. Jim

edit: most markers also have an angle adjustment to try to make the mark dark enough/move enough soil so you can see the mark on the next pass. IF you cant see the mark then try to pivot the marker end disk to make it more aggressive.
 

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SRBeef":2txiald4 said:
First of all, make sure the marker is set properly. Go out in the field and set one down then the other or both down, if your hydraulics allow. There is an extension adjustment on every marker I've seen.

In the US, almost every marker on a planter or drill is intended to put a mark which should be followed with the hood pointer right down the center of the tractor. In Europe the markers are often shorter and intended to place a mark for one of the front tires to run in. This is possible on smaller, open tractors but rarely done in the US. Following is based on US equipment which guides the center of the tractor on the marker mark.

Take a tape measure and make a centerline mark on the frame of the planter.

Calculate the overall planting width = number of rows times the row width. For example 6 rows x 30" row spacing = 180" = 15 ft exactly.

Measure from the centerline on your planter frame out each side to the overall planting width (180" or 15 ft in the example above). THIS is where your marker end disc should be set! Do this for both sides.

On a drill you do the same thing except the row spacing is usually 7.5" or 10".... Is this what you are asking for?

The trick is to keep yourself in the center of the seat when sighting over the hood ornament. Steer the tractor so the hood pointer stays lined up on the mark made on the previous pass.

Good luck. Jim

edit: most markers also have an angle adjustment to try to make the mark dark enough/move enough soil so you can see the mark on the next pass. IF you cant see the mark then try to pivot the marker end disk to make it more aggressive.
This ain't your first rodeo--- is it ???? :tiphat:
 
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blackcowz

blackcowz

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talldog":19kjfmlz said:
SRBeef":19kjfmlz said:
First of all, make sure the marker is set properly. Go out in the field and set one down then the other or both down, if your hydraulics allow. There is an extension adjustment on every marker I've seen.

In the US, almost every marker on a planter or drill is intended to put a mark which should be followed with the hood pointer right down the center of the tractor. In Europe the markers are often shorter and intended to place a mark for one of the front tires to run in. This is possible on smaller, open tractors but rarely done in the US. Following is based on US equipment which guides the center of the tractor on the marker mark.

Take a tape measure and make a centerline mark on the frame of the planter.

Calculate the overall planting width = number of rows times the row width. For example 6 rows x 30" row spacing = 180" = 15 ft exactly.

Measure from the centerline on your planter frame out each side to the overall planting width (180" or 15 ft in the example above). THIS is where your marker end disc should be set! Do this for both sides.

On a drill you do the same thing except the row spacing is usually 7.5" or 10".... Is this what you are asking for?

The trick is to keep yourself in the center of the seat when sighting over the hood ornament. Steer the tractor so the hood pointer stays lined up on the mark made on the previous pass.

Good luck. Jim

edit: most markers also have an angle adjustment to try to make the mark dark enough/move enough soil so you can see the mark on the next pass. IF you cant see the mark then try to pivot the marker end disk to make it more aggressive.
This ain't your first rodeo--- is it ???? :tiphat:

Obviously it is not! Thank you very much Jim! When I calibrate it, I will make sure to get everything set correctly. 'Preciate it!
 

1982vett

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Bez+":3cfrov2m said:
GPS?

Must be some new fangled electric thing - maybe someday I can afford one.

Markers do not need batteries.Bez+

No batteries but they do require you to stay awake. :lol:
 

SRBeef

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blackcowz":2ajnz12c said:
talldog":2ajnz12c said:
SRBeef":2ajnz12c said:
First of all, make sure the marker is set properly. Go out in the field and set one down then the other or both down, if your hydraulics allow. There is an extension adjustment on every marker I've seen.

In the US, almost every marker on a planter or drill is intended to put a mark which should be followed with the hood pointer right down the center of the tractor. In Europe the markers are often shorter and intended to place a mark for one of the front tires to run in. This is possible on smaller, open tractors but rarely done in the US. Following is based on US equipment which guides the center of the tractor on the marker mark.

Take a tape measure and make a centerline mark on the frame of the planter.

Calculate the overall planting width = number of rows times the row width. For example 6 rows x 30" row spacing = 180" = 15 ft exactly.

Measure from the centerline on your planter frame out each side to the overall planting width (180" or 15 ft in the example above). THIS is where your marker end disc should be set! Do this for both sides.

On a drill you do the same thing except the row spacing is usually 7.5" or 10".... Is this what you are asking for?

The trick is to keep yourself in the center of the seat when sighting over the hood ornament. Steer the tractor so the hood pointer stays lined up on the mark made on the previous pass.

Good luck. Jim

edit: most markers also have an angle adjustment to try to make the mark dark enough/move enough soil so you can see the mark on the next pass. IF you cant see the mark then try to pivot the marker end disk to make it more aggressive.
This ain't your first rodeo--- is it ???? :tiphat:

Obviously it is not! Thank you very much Jim! When I calibrate it, I will make sure to get everything set correctly. 'Preciate it!

You are welcome. I don't know much about rodeo but I have worked with planters a few years. We each bring something different to the table. I've learned a lot about cattle from you folks here. I'm sure you'll share some experience that will help me out on some other topic some time. Pretty good deal. Jim
 

AudieWyoming

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SRBeef

I'm not going to quote your whole post to save space. Just want to commend you for a great post. You have a gift of how to share your knowledge in a way that anyone can understand it. GOOD JOB! :clap: :clap:
 

SRBeef

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AudieWyoming":1pqm2bgi said:
SRBeef

I'm not going to quote your whole post to save space. Just want to commend you for a great post. You have a gift of how to share your knowledge in a way that anyone can understand it. GOOD JOB! :clap: :clap:

I think everyone here has some things they know more about than other things. If we each share a bit of what we know think about how much easier that makes things for everyone.

I appreciate the help/education I receive here. It has sure made my learning curve in things related to cattle much faster. Maybe easier on my cattle too!

Thanks for the kind words on this older post.

Jim
 

xbred

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do they make something that you could use when pulling a 15' batwing? so i wouldn't have to look back to see the edge of my last cutting?
 

SRBeef

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xbred":29irt667 said:
do they make something that you could use when pulling a 15' batwing? so i wouldn't have to look back to see the edge of my last cutting?

For a batwing guidance system, I would look into one of the entry level GPS lightbar systems rather than a mechanical marker. These are used a lot on sprayers. Even if it has an accuracy of a foot or two that would be good enough for a mower. The cost might be about a wash. I would talk to your tractor dealer and see what he has.

A lightbar system might even cost LESS than a mechanical marker. You just steer to keep the lights centered. You might be amazed at how much more you can get mowed without a 50% overlap or going back to clip a skip.

Good luck.

Jim
 

Angus Cowman

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as for the batwing marker I seen one that a guy had made he put a piece of 2inch pvc pipe hooked to the front of his tractor that stuck out even with his brushog looked like it worked well for him wouldn't work in my country to many hills ,trees and heavy brush would break it of

he did this because he had a neck injury that limited him turning around and he was just pasture clipping in flat country
 

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