"How To" - Injections

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Hello,

It is time for the various annual shots. I have watched the vets and friends do this and want to try it myself. Any basic info needed. I have a runway/chute to make life easy.

Damon
 

MikeC

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Damon K. Rapozo":2mruofqu said:
Hello,

It is time for the various annual shots. I have watched the vets and friends do this and want to try it myself. Any basic info needed. I have a runway/chute to make life easy.

Damon

There are BQA (Beef Quality Assurance) courses available to assist you.
 

joe

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The BQA course I took had no "training" to speak of. It was shoot 'em in the neck, and do it SQ when possible, no more than 10 cc per injection site. The end. I would have someone with experience, or the vet show you how. The Mrs. was very nervous at first also, but now she does all the injections on the farm. New borns, to the old cows. She uses smaller, and shorter needles than I would, but I think it helps her feel better about doing it.
 

MikeC

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joe":3i2ahr9h said:
The BQA course I took had no "training" to speak of. It was shoot 'em in the neck, and do it SQ when possible, no more than 10 cc per injection site. The end. I would have someone with experience, or the vet show you how. The Mrs. was very nervous at first also, but now she does all the injections on the farm. New borns, to the old cows. She uses smaller, and shorter needles than I would, but I think it helps her feel better about doing it.

No training? The groups I took out got actual "hands on" experience in vaccinating cattle. We worked several groups of calves for willing ranchers.
 

Medic24

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oh my Damon, you just missed our annual workshop here in Asheville,NC were we show any willing person how to vacinate, worm, dehorn, and castrate up to 400 cattle, calves, bison and goats all in one day. perhaps next year you may want to sign up for it early.

There is no tuition required for this one day workshop. But you may need to supply your own overnite accomodations and travel. :cboy:
 

Texan

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I agree with Mike---take advantage of the BQA training provided in your state. If you sell cattle, you're paying for it, anyway.

Try this link. The "Injection Site Management" in Section 2 should be of help to you. Section 4 should also give you a few hints. All of the guides are in PDF format, so it may be a slow load for you. Maybe this will help get you started.

http://www.texasbeefquality.com/handbookGuides.htm
 

Rod

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The schools would be great but I never really had the time myself. I had my vet come out and work a small group of mine and show me as he went along. The next day I was in full force on my own.
 

Running Arrow Bill

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If it's time to vaccinate your cattle, you don't have time to wait and screw around for a "Cattle Course"! Talk to a Vet, let him/her show you how to do it. Common vaccinations are given SQ (Sub-cutaneous) in neck or shoulder area.

It's fairly simple process, if you're careful, and do it properly, and animals are restrained properly.

Bottomline: BE CAREFUL! Don't accidentally stick yourself with a needle. Use new needle for each animal, don't cross-contaminate. Follow directions.

Good luck!
 

Texan

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Running Arrow Bill":2mvreel5 said:
If it's time to vaccinate your cattle, you don't have time to wait and screw around for a "Cattle Course"!
Bill, I think you miss the entire point about Beef Quality Assurance training. It's not intended to teach someone the basics. Mike and I just suggested it would be helpful for everyone who is concerned about beef quality and doing things right to enhance that from a producer standpoint. But I can understand that beef quality would not be a concern of yours. Maybe you participate in an ornamental cow quality assurance program? Maybe pasture art quality assurance? Maybe quality assurance to you is polishing horns? Just keep in mind that people eventually eat your toys, too. Maybe you could try to work in a little BQA training for yourself?

Running Arrow Bill":2mvreel5 said:
Use new needle for each animal, don't cross-contaminate.
While using a new/clean needle is a good idea when doctoring sick cattle, most serious cattlemen probably have to laugh at this suggestion for vaccinations. Cattle lick each others slobber out of the same mineral trough, they drink out of the same pool that others piss in, and they share all the same insect vectors. For many of us, trying to play like a nurse and change needles every time would involve a lot of unnecessary stress for cattle and time in the chute/tub. For cattle, stress and the time spent under stress is wasted money and wasted performance and leads to bigger trouble. In my opinion, if you're working more than just a few head, it's a foolish waste of time to change needles for every animal. Use a fresh needle when you draw. Use a fresh needle when one gets bent or dull. Use a fresh needle after 10 head or so. But get the cattle worked and get them turned out!
 

MikeC

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Running Arrow Bill":2ek5kvww said:
If it's time to vaccinate your cattle, you don't have time to wait and screw around for a "Cattle Course"! Talk to a Vet, let him/her show you how to do it. Common vaccinations are given SQ (Sub-cutaneous) in neck or shoulder area.

It's fairly simple process, if you're careful, and do it properly, and animals are restrained properly.

Bottomline: BE CAREFUL! Don't accidentally stick yourself with a needle. Use new needle for each animal, don't cross-contaminate. Follow directions.

Good luck!

Bill, There is lots more to vaccinating cattle than just "sticking a needle" in her. Teaching someone the proper protocol is not "screwing around" when they know nothing to start with.
Obviously, Damon does not.
 

MikeC

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Bill, The BQA is more than a "Cattle Course". Many people do not know that the following guidelines must be met or you may not get your cattle sold.

From the BQA website:
Processing/Treatment and Records

Following all FDA/USDA/EPA guidelines for product(s) utilized.
All products are to be used per label directions.
Extra-label drug use shall be kept to a minimum, and uses only when prescribed by a veterinarian working under a Valid Veterinary Client Patient Relationship (VCPR).
Strict adherence to extended withdrawal periods (as determined by the veterinarian within the context of a valid VCPR) shall be employed.
Treatment records will be maintained with the following recorded:
1. Individual animal or group identification

2. Date treated

3. Product administrated and manufacture's lot/serial number

4. Dosage used

5. Route and location of administration

6. Earliest date animal will have cleared withdrawal period.

When cattle are processed as a group, all cattle within the group shall be identified as such, and the following information recorded:
1. Group or lot identification

2. Date treated

3. Product administered and manufacturer's lot/serial number.

4. Dosage used.

5. Route and location of administration.

6. Earliest date animal will have cleared withdrawal period.

All cattle (fed and non-fed) shipped to slaughter will be checked by appropriate personnel to assure that animals that have been treated meet or exceed label or prescription withdrawal times for all animal health products administrated.
All processing and treatment records should be transferred with the cattle to next production level. Prospective buyers must be informed of any cattle that have not met withdrawal times.
Injectable Animal Health Products:

Products labeled for subcutaneous (SQ) administration should be administered SQ in the neck region (ahead of the shoulders).
All products labeled for intra-muscular (IM) use shall be given in the neck region only (no exceptions, regardless of age).
All products cause tissue damage when injected IM. Therefore all IM use should be avoided if possible.
Products cleared for SQ, IV or oral administration are recommended.
Products with low dosage rates are recommended and proper spacing should be followed.
No more than 10 cc of product is administered per IM injection site.
 

Bama

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I go along with the get em in get it over with crowd. I pour wormer down all the backs that are in the alley/chute at once. I sometimes even give the shots before the headgate. Less time in confinement the better in my opinion. I also use the same needle unless one is sick. If one is sick they are not usually in general population anyway.
 

sidney411

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I agree - when I vaccinate where I have a long - tight chute, I pack the chute, 6 cows at a time, and go down the line with the shots. 1 syringe will vaccinate 10 head. Change needle after 10 head. Vaccinate - then let em out. Less stress and a lot faster then working one at a time through the squeese chute.

Also - you can check with your local extension office - they can direct you to where you need to go to a "cattle course". I highly reccomend attending some of these seminars - a wealth of free valuable information, and always someone to ask questions from. I've been to many and learned a great deal, food's usually pretty good too!
 

Bama

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I guess I should add that I use kinda a modified tenting method. With them in the chute (I call the alley before the headgate the chute, some call it alley) I pour em then come back with the needle. I pull the skin away and stick the needle strait down. Being careful not to go through the other side. Having a catwalk beside the chute is a big asset. I used this method in the past and have started ( should have finished by now ) a new corral. I arranged sweep gates and tubs where I can do all of this myself. A little planning goes a long way in ease of use.
 
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