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How do you tell the difference?

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Anonymous

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How do you tell the difference in scours and watery stools? Every year my cattle get extremely lose stools (like water). They are grazing rye grass and clover. I’ve never treated them for anything and I’ve never had a problem except dirty boots. Should I do anything? I’m thinking of feeding good quality hay just to slow it down some and possibly receive better gains. Any advice would be appreciated.

Tod NTD Red Angus
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
> How do you tell the difference in
> scours and watery stools? Every
> year my cattle get extremely lose
> stools (like water). They are
> grazing rye grass and clover. I’ve
> never treated them for anything
> and I’ve never had a problem
> except dirty boots. Should I do
> anything? I’m thinking of feeding
> good quality hay just to slow it
> down some and possibly receive
> better gains. Any advice would be
> appreciated.

> Tod NTD Red Angus

I have noticed the same thing every spring. I think it is the high water content in the spring grasses, Especially clover. This is the time I get rid of my older hay just to give them some dry matter. Seems to work. I didn't answer your question, but to say I think you are on the right track.

>Rod
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
Would agree. Too much fresh green grass and ESPECIALLY clover...probably not good for cattle. Need PLENTY of dry matter too...HAY! Also, be darn careful if any cattle are trying to graze wheat, soghrum, or fescue areas...can be toxic!
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
its because of the richness and sudden change in teh diet that they get an upset stomach and the squirts.

scours will be clumpy and stuck all over their tail and anus. and yellowy or white-gray.in severe cases it will be bloody. whereas diarrhea will look like your calves with the squirts do. scours usually occurs in calves a few weeks old or younger. also you can usually look at the calf and tell it has scours, it will look unthrifty, maybe thin, as it progresses their eyes will get glazy and they will get weak and possibly die. occasionally they will recover on their own but most of the time have to be treated with a bolus.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
For me, it's a matter of effect on the animal....just plain loose manure in an animal which is eating well, maintaining/gaining condition and has had a recent feed change is likely a nutrient overload which may or may not turn into diarrhea. (with lush grass, the nutrient is often water....) If it is affecting the animal with change of attitude,decrease in condition, or hydration, it's diarrhea and must be investigated. Clear as mud? V

> How do you tell the difference in
> scours and watery stools? Every
> year my cattle get extremely lose
> stools (like water). They are
> grazing rye grass and clover. I’ve
> never treated them for anything
> and I’ve never had a problem
> except dirty boots. Should I do
> anything? I’m thinking of feeding
> good quality hay just to slow it
> down some and possibly receive
> better gains. Any advice would be
> appreciated.

> Tod NTD Red Angus
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Scours will offten have a very foul smell. Cattle grazing wet forrage/ lush winter pasture, will get loose feces. A customer of mine who is a vet recommends feeding a poor quality ( low protein) hay to increas dry fiber consumpion, which will add bulky fibre and reduce the loose feces, to at least a softer formed fecal mass rather than the runs.

Good Luck, also it is not common for adult animals to get Diarrhea, that is caused by organisms that are harmful such as Salmonela, spread by birds and requires treatment.

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