How do you make a tatoo?

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A

Anonymous

I know there in the ear but how do you put it in and if there is one already there how do you find it,what do you look for?
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Tattos are applied with a tatto tool, it has interchangable letters so you can use the correct tatto for whatever given purpose. Most people use green ink and it will appear as a bunch of dots that define the letter or number. If the ear is thin you can sometimes see through them with a strong light, you can sometimes feel the individual bumps. If the ear is very hairy you can clip the hair short and read it that way.

dunmovin farms

> I know there in the ear but how do
> you put it in and if there is one
> already there how do you find
> it,what do you look for?
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> Tattos are applied with a tatto
> tool, it has interchangable
> letters so you can use the correct
> tatto for whatever given purpose.
> Most people use green ink and it
> will appear as a bunch of dots
> that define the letter or number.
> If the ear is thin you can
> sometimes see through them with a
> strong light, you can sometimes
> feel the individual bumps. If the
> ear is very hairy you can clip the
> hair short and read it that way.

> dunmovin farms

Thank You, Now what is that silver inch long thing with numbers on it for?
 
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A

Anonymous

Is it bent double and clipped through the cows ear? If so, it is either for blood work or bangs vaccination. Or if a dairy cow, could be it's DHIA number.

dunmovin farms

> Thank You, Now what is that silver
> inch long thing with numbers on it
> for?
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> Is it bent double and clipped
> through the cows ear? If so, it is
> either for blood work or bangs
> vaccination. Or if a dairy cow,
> could be it's DHIA number.

> dunmovin farms

Yes it is bent double, it is on some angus heifers I saw, what type of blood work do cattle need to have for this, is it important?
 
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A

Anonymous

When cattle are moved from state to state or there is a chance they will there are some blood tests that get done. I'm not sure what but it may be for bangs. All of our cattle that came from out of state and most that we bought locally have them also. Your local vet can answer what they are usually tested for. I believe if they are bangs vaccinated there is also a tatto.

dunmovin farms

Yes it is bent double, it is on
> some angus heifers I saw, what
> type of blood work do cattle need
> to have for this, is it important?
 
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A

Anonymous

> to have for this, is it important? ***** You better believe that tag is important. In the United States, since the 1950's (maybe earlier), we have all but eradicated bangs. The rule of the land says that if a cow hasn't been bangs vaccinated, it can't be sold. I don't know about blood work, but I do know that the vaccination for brucellosis (bangs) has to be done on all female bovine at age six months. USA veterinarians can explain the necessity and importance better than I. States that have buffalo (wild) herds have some real problems because the buffalo herds are not being bangs vaccinated and it reflects on the cattlemen in those states. Someone in Montana can explain that better than I also. I don't know why, if buffalo herds carry brucellosis, they aren't being vaccinated by fish and game, but... I guess it is a religious thing.... political rant OVER! lol

[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

May I offer what I think are a couple of corrections to Omak's comments (if I'm wrong, please don't anybody hesitate to correct me!). I agree on the need for and advisability of getting cows vacinated for "bangs" -- but unvacinated cows can certainly be sold at private treaty and in weekday sale barns, etc. -- happens every day. And I think that currently the rule is that heifers can be as old as 10 months of age and the vet will still vacinate and ear tag them. I think the maximum allowable age used to be 12 months but there was a concern, or belief, that heifers that were vacinated at 12 months of age were showing "false positive" test results when those animals grew into cows and were later bangs tested at sale barns, etc. So the gov't. dropped the age down to 10 months. That being said, I agree that it is certainly important to have heifers vacinated for bangs -- if you ever have a cow that fails the bangs test at a sale barn you will get a much reduced price for her at that sale and your herd will, at the very minimum, be quarantined, as will the herds of neighbors, etc. A real "pisser" all around. Also, buyers at spring and fall replacement sales want to buy animals that have had all the necessary vacinations, so not getting the heifers vacinated could hurt you later down the road even if they don't come down with bangs.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

You're correct about the requirement to vaccinate. Now that I've sat and pondered, I think the blood work that the always talk about when they ear tag them is a bloodtest for bangs.

dunmovin farms

> May I offer what I think are a
> couple of corrections to Omak's
> comments (if I'm wrong, please
> don't anybody hesitate to correct
> me!). I agree on the need for and
> advisability of getting cows
> vacinated for "bangs" --
> but unvacinated cows can certainly
> be sold at private treaty and in
> weekday sale barns, etc. --
> happens every day. And I think
> that currently the rule is that
> heifers can be as old as 10 months
> of age and the vet will still
> vacinate and ear tag them. I think
> the maximum allowable age used to
> be 12 months but there was a
> concern, or belief, that heifers
> that were vacinated at 12 months
> of age were showing "false
> positive" test results when
> those animals grew into cows and
> were later bangs tested at sale
> barns, etc. So the gov't. dropped
> the age down to 10 months. That
> being said, I agree that it is
> certainly important to have
> heifers vacinated for bangs -- if
> you ever have a cow that fails the
> bangs test at a sale barn you will
> get a much reduced price for her
> at that sale and your herd will,
> at the very minimum, be
> quarantined, as will the herds of
> neighbors, etc. A real
> "pisser" all around.
> Also, buyers at spring and fall
> replacement sales want to buy
> animals that have had all the
> necessary vacinations, so not
> getting the heifers vacinated
> could hurt you later down the road
> even if they don't come down with
> bangs.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Just a different perspective here. We, in Canada, cannot obtain the brucellosis vaccine (it's not available) thus we cannot vaccinate. If an animal tested positive, we've used a test and slaughter regime for decades (all positives and the whole herd slaughtered)--and we are brucellosis free. In Wood Bison National Park, there have been occasional concerns re: brucellosis but our cattle herd is 100% free. We are also anaplasmosis, bluetongue, & vesicular stomatitis free. It seems quite effective to eliminate the disease instead of ensuring that you cannot ever eliminate it with vaccination. Just MHO
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> Just a different perspective here.
> We, in Canada, cannot obtain the
> brucellosis vaccine (it's not
> available) thus we cannot
> vaccinate. If an animal tested
> positive, we've used a test and
> slaughter regime for decades (all
> positives and the whole herd
> slaughtered)--and we are
> brucellosis free. In Wood Bison
> National Park, there have been
> occasional concerns re:
> brucellosis but our cattle herd is
> 100% free. We are also
> anaplasmosis, bluetongue, &
> vesicular stomatitis free. It
> seems quite effective to eliminate
> the disease instead of ensuring
> that you cannot ever eliminate it
> with vaccination. Just MHO

You all got Mongo confused, So I need to vacinate for blackleg,and bangs then put a silver dill in their ear, and dont by any cattle without it?
 
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A

Anonymous

That silver tag (mine happen to be orange) is placed in the ear by the veterinarian who gives the vaccine. It is a live virus and you will not be able to give this shot by yourself. Which is what I probably should have told you in the first place.... GO TALK TO YOUR VET. lol... sorry about that little oversight. There are just some shots that we ranchers cannot do ourselves. As for the yearly vaccines that you have to give your cattle, I asked my family what they give, and they give an 8-way, Ivomec (for worms and insects) and Lepto. My dad and brother studied vet sciences, and so I follow what they say, but don't know what all those things do. The bangs (brucellosis) shot is a one-shot deal that we do at six months of age in every heifer.

[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

Since when can't we get the Brucella vaccine? I have had heifers bangs vaccinated for export to the States before. It has been a while, but last I knew I could still do it.

It has to be administered by a vet between 4 and 8 months of age. I still have some cows that never got exported with the silver tag and a certificate attached to their paper stating they were vaccinated.

We don't need to do it because of our brucellosis free status, but if a US customer wanted it could we still?

Jason Trowbridge Southern Angus Farms Alberta Canada

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Yes, Jason, we used to be able to vaccinate, but unless things have changed in the past 6 months, as of last spring, there are no licenced vaccines in Canada. I didn't do much vaccination in the past 3 years, and was quite surprised when a client sold cattle to Texas and we couldn't vaccinate the calves. And yes, our regs. still state that they must be 4-8 months of age. So we are legally able to vaccinate -- if you can get the vaccine.
 
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A

Anonymous

In the US, because of the risk of brucellosis, it is probably safest and most economical to buy all females which have been vaccinated, especially in affected states which include Texas, Idaho now and one or two others I can't think of. This is a one shot deal which is done by your vet at a specific time. The vet then tattoos &/or tags the animal.

Yearly vaccination is different, and varies by regions. In Ontario, where I practice, all cattle (especially calves) are generally done for IBR-PI3, BVD, BRSV, some for lepto, some for 8way blackleg (all should, but some don't)some for Hemophilus somnus, a few for Pasturella and some for rabies. When I worked in Western Canada, the vaccines were completely different and included Vibriosis, E. coli and rota/corona in most herds, and NEVER rabies. So every area is different. Ivomec or dectomax or eprinex or cydectin etc are all systemic dewormers with varying efficacy on internal and external parasites, and different withdrawal periods. In some areas, you also need to worry about liver flukes, which none of the above products get alone without an additive. (I could be wrong on this, I know of no licenced flukicide combos in Canada) So my best recommendation is ask your vet what is required and optional in your area for vaccination.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

I have a question. I don't know if you know the answer, even, but... If Canada has no brucella vaccine... does that mean that every female bovine that comes from Canada down into the United States has been tested and provided a health certificate before it goes into the US sales rings? Does the Canadian cattle producer pay for that test, if not, who does? Just wondering....

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> In the US, because of the risk of
> brucellosis, it is probably safest
> and most economical to buy all
> females which have been
> vaccinated, especially in affected
> states which include Texas, Idaho
> now and one or two others I can't
> think of. This is a one shot deal

> which is done by your vet at a
> specific time. The vet then
> tattoos &/or tags the animal.

> Yearly vaccination is different,
> and varies by regions. In Ontario,
> where I practice, all cattle
> (especially calves) are generally
> done for IBR-PI3, BVD, BRSV, some
> for lepto, some for 8way blackleg
> (all should, but some don't)some
> for Hemophilus somnus, a few for
> Pasturella and some for rabies.
> When I worked in Western Canada,
> the vaccines were completely
> different and included Vibriosis,
> E. coli and rota/corona in most
> herds, and NEVER rabies. So every
> area is different. Ivomec or
> dectomax or eprinex or cydectin
> etc are all systemic dewormers
> with varying efficacy on internal
> and external parasites, and
> different withdrawal periods. In
> some areas, you also need to worry
> about liver flukes, which none of
> the above products get alone
> without an additive. (I could be
> wrong on this, I know of no
> licenced flukicide combos in
> Canada) So my best recommendation
> is ask your vet what is required
> and optional in your area for
> vaccination.

Why is the vet the only one that can give the brucc. shot, is there a special procedure? Thanks for the earlier replies to everyone.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

***** The reason that the vet is the ONLY one that can give the brucellosis shot is because it is a LIVE vaccine. He is also accountable to the state for which shots he gave to whom... He is the one that records and sets the tatoo, and he also records the number that is on the tag.... and, as far as I know, the vet is the ONLY authority that can do all of that, recognized by the state. > Why is the vet the only one that
> can give the brucc. shot, is there
> a special procedure? Thanks for
> the earlier replies to everyone.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

The vaccine is a simple subcutaneous shot. The vet must administer for a few reasons. 1) the vaccine can KILL you if you poke yourself with the needle 2) paperwork must be signed by a vet, and they won't sign without doing the work 3)tags and/or tattoos only done by a vet..... Enough reasons? V
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> The vaccine is a simple
> subcutaneous shot. The vet must
> administer for a few reasons. 1)
> the vaccine can KILL you if you
> poke yourself with the needle 2)
> paperwork must be signed by a vet,
> and they won't sign without doing
> the work 3)tags and/or tattoos
> only done by a vet..... Enough
> reasons? V

The first one is the only one I needed, kinda scary. But about the tatoos, how would that work with the tatoos your supposed to put on registered cattle.
 

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