Horns

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Anonymous

I have a 6 month old Dexter and when I purchased her from the breeder they told me she was dehorned - they used the paste method. She now has stubs for horns and it appears they are starting to grow. Are you supposed to continue putting the paste on her horns or will these not grow completely - any advice anyone can give me before I call my vet would be appreciated. Thanks.

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Anonymous

Can you wiggle or move them or are they afixed tightly? If they're loose they are scurs and will grow but not usually to a very significant degree. If they're tightly attached, that's horns. I'm no expert on dehorning but the common methed for 2-3 inch horns is scooping them out. If you're not experienced at it get a "good" large animal vet to do the job.

dun

> I have a 6 month old Dexter and
> when I purchased her from the
> breeder they told me she was
> dehorned - they used the paste
> method. She now has stubs for
> horns and it appears they are
> starting to grow. Are you supposed
> to continue putting the paste on
> her horns or will these not grow
> completely - any advice anyone can
> give me before I call my vet would
> be appreciated. Thanks.



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A

Anonymous

Dun, they are afixed tight. If I would have known this when I got her, I would have had the vet out right away to finish the dehorning, but I was told she was dehorned, they had their vet out before I picked her up - guess next time I should not be so trusting. I have a vet who can do the job, was hoping I would not have to go this route, the poor thing, the "scooping" has to be painful. Thank you very much for your help.

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Anonymous

Suggest on any "painful" medical procedure you ask your Vet to administer an anesthetic that will last several hours after procedure.

Reason: a "bad" experience any animal has will be remembered and he/she may be less cooperative on next vet, etc., visit, procedure. Pain is pain, regardless of the animal species--some tolerate it more than others....

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Anonymous

That is my dilemma - the pain - she is a pet and her disposition is wonderful, she is very gentle. I am thinking that I will just leave the horns, instead of putting her through the pain. I will call my vet and see what he says. Thank you.

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Anonymous

most vets will do a surgical dehorn in which they use a general anesthesia and will then sew up the hole left where the horn was. this is more expensive than the general scoop & burn method. some vets use anesthesia for scoop & burn and some do not although probably any will if you request it. of course after the anesthesia wears off, there will still be some soreness but as with any surgery (human or animal) this will go away. animals, like humans, also seem to have the ability to forget the pain. i had show steers dehorned growing up and there was no noticeable difference in their attitude toward me after dehorning. while a pet now, she may learn that those horns can get her things she wants and use them to her advantage. my advice would be to take them off.
 
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Anonymous

Her pain now or your pain later. Unless you plan as using her as an ox in a yoke, get rid of them.

dun

> That is my dilemma - the pain -
> she is a pet and her disposition
> is wonderful, she is very gentle.
> I am thinking that I will just
> leave the horns, instead of
> putting her through the pain. I
> will call my vet and see what he
> says. Thank you.



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A

Anonymous

I agree with Dun. Best example I can give you from personal experience - one winter night we were bringing our polled cow back from an out of state breeding. This is a very gentle, halter broke cow. While leading the cow through the corrals, one of our horses came up and sniffed the cow's butt. Startled, she whipped her head around to see what was behind her. Unfortunately, she hit my husband in the right upper quadrant of his abdomen with the top of her head. He was swollen and badly bruised for quite some time. If she had had horns, she would have likely killed him with that one blow.

> Her pain now or your pain later.
> Unless you plan as using her as an
> ox in a yoke, get rid of them.

> dun
 
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Anonymous

At the height of a Dexter that incident would have been even uglier!

dun

> I agree with Dun. Best example I
> can give you from personal
> experience - one winter night we
> were bringing our polled cow back
> from an out of state breeding.
> This is a very gentle, halter
> broke cow. While leading the cow
> through the corrals, one of our
> horses came up and sniffed the
> cow's butt. Startled, she whipped
> her head around to see what was
> behind her. Unfortunately, she hit
> my husband in the right upper
> quadrant of his abdomen with the
> top of her head. He was swollen
> and badly bruised for quite some
> time. If she had had horns, she
> would have likely killed him with
> that one blow.



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Anonymous

Horns: large farm hundreds of calves, we pasted and acid burned the nubs as general procedure. Small 6-8 head family cows, we let the horns grow and then sawed them off. Less painful and more humane in our view. The problem lies in if you have never done this you can really screw it up. Cutting too deep, cutting too soon and ugly cut horns grow out etc. We still cut with a saw, but this is becoming a lost skill I think (not really a difficult skill, but it is just not done anymore). If you know someone that does it, think you can do it and do not mind waiting and dealing with horns until they are fully grown then this is an option. If not then call the vet. You should also have a vet who you trust and can talk to and is willing to take your wishes into consideration. Talk to your vet, see what she/he has to say and can do for you. Burning, crushing, scooping always seemed more cruel to me then cutting, but that is me and on the large farm it was not practical to wait a cut so we burned. With the heifer I am raising now with my son we will wait and cut. Thanks, rick

> I have a 6 month old Dexter and
> when I purchased her from the
> breeder they told me she was
> dehorned - they used the paste
> method. She now has stubs for
> horns and it appears they are
> starting to grow. Are you supposed
> to continue putting the paste on
> her horns or will these not grow
> completely - any advice anyone can
> give me before I call my vet would
> be appreciated. Thanks.



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A

Anonymous

Around here, the vet burns the horn buds off at approximately 7 weeks of age. After having cows burned by the paste and having calves/heifers dehorned by sawing/scooping at later ages, IMO burning the horn buds at a young age is the most humane way of doing it. There is initial pain, but if the person handling the iron knows what they're doing, the nerves are destroyed immediately and there is no more pain. Their head is tender for a few days, which works perfectly for us -- most of our calves are raised on a bottle and at 7 weeks have just been weaned and burning the horn buds at that point breaks the habit of butting. I must admit that their head looks a bit ugly for a few weeks, but when all is said and done, there is no scarring, the animals exhibit less "post operative" pain, and when totally healed they appear to be naturally polled.

Ann B

> Horns: large farm hundreds of
> calves, we pasted and acid burned
> the nubs as general procedure.
> Small 6-8 head family cows, we let
> the horns grow and then sawed them
> off. Less painful and more humane
> in our view. The problem lies in
> if you have never done this you
> can really screw it up. Cutting
> too deep, cutting too soon and
> ugly cut horns grow out etc. We
> still cut with a saw, but this is
> becoming a lost skill I think (not
> really a difficult skill, but it
> is just not done anymore). If you
> know someone that does it, think
> you can do it and do not mind
> waiting and dealing with horns
> until they are fully grown then
> this is an option. If not then
> call the vet. You should also have
> a vet who you trust and can talk
> to and is willing to take your
> wishes into consideration. Talk to
> your vet, see what she/he has to
> say and can do for you. Burning,
> crushing, scooping always seemed
> more cruel to me then cutting, but
> that is me and on the large farm
> it was not practical to wait a cut
> so we burned. With the heifer I am
> raising now with my son we will
> wait and cut. Thanks, rick



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Anonymous

Dun, by the time I got around to reading this thread there had been 54 views on your comment. Assuming the typical M/F demographic, you have already caused 27 readers to double up in their chairs.

We don’t run any horned cattle any more. The only advantage to keeping cattle with horns is so they can fight off predators more effectively. Still not worth it, IMO. But, as in all other opinions, I reserve the right to change my mind (snort) since the coyotes are worse right now than they’ve been in a long time. Not to mention the sorry lion(s) haunting the area.

Craig-TX
 
OP
A

Anonymous

>
> We don’t run any horned cattle any
> more. The only advantage to
> keeping cattle with horns is so
> they can fight off predators more
> effectively. Still not worth it,
> IMO. But, as in all other
> opinions, I reserve the right to
> change my mind (snort) since the
> coyotes are worse right now than
> they’ve been in a long time. Not
> to mention the sorry lion(s)
> haunting the area.

> Craig-TX

Where are you having lion trouble. I haven't heard of any south of ElPaso in quite a while. Of course I haven't had livestock for a while so I'm probally just out of touch. Teri



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Anonymous

Thank you very much for all your advice. I will be talking to my vet this afternoon and will find out what he suggests the best way to dehorn her. Happy Holidays.

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A

Anonymous

> Dun, by the time I got around to
> reading this thread there had been
> 54 views on your comment. Assuming
> the typical M/F demographic, you
> have already caused 27 readers to
> double up in their chairs.

> We don’t run any horned cattle any
> more. The only advantage to
> keeping cattle with horns is so
> they can fight off predators more
> effectively. Still not worth it,
> IMO. But, as in all other
> opinions, I reserve the right to
> change my mind (snort) since the
> coyotes are worse right now than
> they’ve been in a long time. Not
> to mention the sorry lion(s)
> haunting the area.

> Craig-TX

It seems that the puma population must be expanding at a pretty decent clip in Texas, much to the dismay of cattlemen but no doubt to the delight of some animal lovers. A friend just today emailed me a picture of an absolutely HUGE puma that was killed recently on a ranch in the western hill country of Texas, near Junction. Very impressive size when shown alongside a man that is 6' 2" and pretty hefty himself. A cat that size would have no trouble taking down just about any 4 legged critter that walks in Texas, not to mention two legged ones. It was killed early one morning by a guy out hunting coyotes with a wounded prey call. There are reported to be some active cats in the San Saba area near where I hunt deer, and if I am lucky enough to see one before it sees me I intend to send some real hot lead its way!
 
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Anonymous

There have been quite a few lion sighting here in North Central Kansas the past few years... The WildLife Department declines releasing them but when they show up and say you have one in the shed. You wonder how they found out when nobody has been told. (happened more than once around these parts) If I ever get a shot on one I'll be sure not to miss... Jake

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Anonymous

Terri, I’m in east central Texas. They are an on-again off-again problem, usually not near as much of a cost as coyotes. I know of a couple that have been seen in the past three or four months. One appeared to be a yearling and the other was full grown. We’ve lost one calf this year that was clearly from a lion/puma/panther. If any black panthers that have been spotted since spring I haven’t heard about it. They don’t seem to be quite as common. None of them are what I would call common in these parts, but one is too common for anybody running livestock.

I’ve seen a few and only got a shot off at one in my life. It was a few years back on a chilly, gray afternoon. My dad and I were driving down a farm-to-market road about five miles from the house and saw it cross way up ahead, maybe 4–500 yards. We could easily tell it wasn’t a deer and when it got to the fence and jumped over we knew it wasn’t a wolf. As we got close to where it crossed we slowed down to look. Lo and behold, there it was, crouched down in the broomweeds about 15 feet inside the fence, just watching us pull up! It must have thought we couldn’t see it, but it stuck out like a sore thumb. We had been in town and wouldn’t you know it, all we had was a pistol. As we rolled to a stop it started and I’m here to tell you, that cat was carrying the mail. It would have been the shot of a lifetime to hit it with a rifle. All I could do was jump out and take a couple of pot shots. I hit close enough to make it zig and zag but probably didn’t come within five feet. It was full grown and a beautiful sight to see. Besides its power, grace and speed the thing that made the biggest impression on me was the length of its tail.

Arnold and Jake, both of you sure seem like straight shooters to me. I hope you are – in more ways than one!

Craig-TX
 
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Anonymous

I've seen three... two my grandpa and I didn't have a gun in the truck and the other there were some younger cousins in the truck so he got to keep walking the creeks. We've lost two calves to lions or so our trapper neighbor and us think. Just hope we get ahead of them instead of even. Jake

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Anonymous

> I've seen three... two my grandpa
> and I didn't have a gun in the
> truck and the other there were Fear is a strange thing, Why does man feel he needs to kill everything? Yes I am sure a over pouplation of cats could be a problem, lose a calf here and there, but at the same time how many dogs kill calves each year . Yes I am sure that you all feel like it is the right thing to do, kill THE LION every chance you get,(Or any chance you get). I just hope Texas law protects them, and when you shoot ,They deal with you , as fast and as effective as you did with that Lion.ALF...

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