hoof problems

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royB

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My current hoof problem is on a 3 yr old reg. Angus cow. Her right hoof is cracked/split horizontally (side to side) about half way up. I put her in a small lot so she did not have to walk far for food or water, and there is no mud or water for her to get into.

My questions:
1. Is there anything I can do? I'll be taking her to the vet but over the phone he didn't sound too sure he could do much for her.

2. I have a small herd, 7 crossbred, 7 reg angus. All but one of the angus has had problems with their feet, not one of the crossbreds have. Is this an Angus thing or is it just coincidence?


thanks,
Roy
 
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royB

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Dun, I should have been more descriptive with the question of Angus hoof problems. There were several problems, not all the same problem. I was just wondering if there is a weakness in the feet and legs of Angus compared to run of the mill crossbreds. They all get the same feed, mineral and pasture so it just seemed strange that it would only be the Angus.


Thanks
 

dun

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royB":3pefbabo said:
Dun, I should have been more descriptive with the question of Angus hoof problems. There were several problems, not all the same problem. I was just wondering if there is a weakness in the feet and legs of Angus compared to run of the mill crossbreds. They all get the same feed, mineral and pasture so it just seemed strange that it would only be the Angus.


Thanks

Unless it's in a particular genetic family there aren't any foot/leg weakness inherent in the breed. A particular bloodline may have a problem, but if they're not closely related I don't think that would be the problem. How deep are the cracks, only one foot or one toe or all the feet and all of the toes? Old cows, young cows? Other then being Angus what do they have in common that is not in common with the others. We have one old angus cow 12-14 don't recall which right now, that has feet and legs that would be the envy of most yearlings. Another that is only 7-8 that has had problems with her feet, sore and limpy when she's on rocky ground.
I just lay it down to one of the wonderful mysterys of cows

dun
 

TheBullLady

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If you have a teaching vet college anywhere close by, you can give them a call. They are generally more receptive to trying to help with a problem like you have, as opposed to a local vet that doesn't want to spend the time. (I have that problem)

I've got a Simmental that has a similiar problem with one front foot. We've got her in the front pasture now, but before that she'd spend a lot of time standing in the stock tank, which is not a good thing for their feet. I hauled her down to A & M two summers ago, and they trimmed all her feet and laced together the cracked front foot. Dr. Hooper said it's hereditary, and there is a likelyhood of passing the same problem on to her calves. I've kept her first heifer, and so far she's fine (She's a 2 year old). But with the older cow, I've pretty much resigned myself to a yearly vet visit for trimming.
 

Bez

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Not enough info here.

What type of ground was the animal originally on?

Is the animal in pain?

Leaking any fluids?

And so on.

If the animal is walking normally - turn her out.

I suspect what we call sand cracks. Many different breeds can have small cracks form in the hoof. It does not have an adverse affect on the animal.

If the animal is in pain - then the problem is obviously more serious. Have the vet in for a look see. If the problem persists - then cull it to prevent it from carrying on into the next generation.

If all the animals but one are experiencing the same problem - and it causes you worry and them pain - then cull them all - use the proceeds to buy replacements and save the trouble and worry.

Best regards

Bez
 

Michelle Pankonien

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Great for all hoof injuries

We LOVE cow-slips, you can get them from Jeffers Valley Vet etc. if you vet does not have them many wont,

Most run of the mill commercial guys and gals send lame cattle to the sale and never worry about it, even when a $20 hoof trim would have fixed it and added lots of use to the life of the beast

OK, first, if you don't have a flip chute or a hoof trimmer to come out, get the animal in the squeeze chute, restrain well, them with a heavy duty cotton rope, make a loop with a bowlin knot, then run the rope through so you have a giant rope, catch ankle, pastern of cow, tighten the loop,

raise the limb so that underside of hoof is exposed, trim affected toe with rasp and nippers, then grind smooth with a sander till you see a red line (this is blood) SSSSTOP

The unaffected toe should be mildly trimmed to prepare a rough, level clean surface to adhere the cowslip to.

Set the cow slip on toe with appoxy after cleaning with acetone, wait for it to dry and set, then let the animal out to walk, may be tender for a day or two, but usually they will walk off sound as a dollar.

Have used these on severly fractured hooves where we actualy had small part of bone break off toe, bull healled and is now happily serving at stud somewhere, sound and hoof grew back great after 1 additional trim 60 days later
 
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