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Hoof problem, newborn calves

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Anonymous

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I am a relative novice in the cattle business. Producing on average, about 10 calves per year for the past 11 years does not give me a large base but I have not had any hoof problems until this year. My herd of females for the most part is unchanged but I did change bulls last year. Of the 8 calves born this fall, I have had 2 born with the front feet turned back so that the calves walk on their "ankles". One of them straightened out after 3 or 4 days. The other one still has a problem with the right hoof at 3 weeks old. Am I looking at just a fluke or do I have a genetic problem? I already have 4 heifers bred to that bull for spring calves. I am asking for advice and any comments would be appreciated.<br> Thanks<br> Mack Powers<br> XP Acres
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Anonymous

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<br>: I am a relative novice in the cattle business. Producing on average, about 10 calves per year for the past 11 years does not give me a large base but I have not had any hoof problems until this year. My herd of females for the most part is unchanged but I did change bulls last year. Of the 8 calves born this fall, I have had 2 born with the front feet turned back so that the calves walk on their "ankles". One of them straightened out after 3 or 4 days. The other one still has a problem with the right hoof at 3 weeks old. Am I looking at just a fluke or do I have a genetic problem? I already have 4 heifers bred to that bull for spring calves. I am asking for advice and any comments would be appreciated.<br>: Thanks<br>: Mack Powers<br>: XP Acres <p>Hello Mack,<br>This is not an unusual problem, but of course one we don't like to see. My vet is not absolutely sure, but speculates this is related to a nerve problem in the hoof. Usually this condition takes care of itself in about a week just as you have experienced. I have had one calf in 20 years with multiple problems at birth that never recovered. Most of my experience with this occurs when assistance at calving is necessary and I think the chains damage that area above the hoof. I have tried to wrap the ankle area with an elastic wrap for support which helps in some cases. I haven't had this happen enough to make me think it is a genetic problem, if that makes you feel any better. Keep me posted. Chances aregood they will get over this. Good Luck.<br>Mike H.
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Anonymous

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Mack,<br>Like Mike, most of the calves I've had with this problem have been assisted births or premature. I stand the calf several times a day for 15-30 minutes with its legs in proper position. Be careful when straighting the ankles if they are tight because you will be stretching tendons and muscle. This may be the case after three weeks. I have heard of people putting on splints to correct this, but ask your vet before doing this or Vicki the vet may read this and advise you. Good luck.<p>Robert
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Thanks for your comments. I am writing this in response to the things you have said. The first calf with the hoof problem, got his act together within a few days and is fine now. The second one is still walking on his right ankle approaching the fourth week. There is no bone fusion as someone suggested, because the foot will straighten out easily. We did splint the leg after about 10 days and left it on for 8 days. We took it off when we noticed that he was walking on his knee. Five days after removing the splint, he still walks on the "ankle" but when standing still, he does rest his leg up on the hoof. I am trying to take this as a good sign that he is on the mend. I appreciate your comments and am still open to further suggestions. My biggest concern is the genetic factor since I can't afford a new bull every year. I guess we will wait and see what the next few calves look like.<br> Thanks Again<br> Mack<p>: I am a relative novice in the cattle business. Producing on average, about 10 calves per year for the past 11 years does not give me a large base but I have not had any hoof problems until this year. My herd of females for the most part is unchanged but I did change bulls last year. Of the 8 calves born this fall, I have had 2 born with the front feet turned back so that the calves walk on their "ankles". One of them straightened out after 3 or 4 days. The other one still has a problem with the right hoof at 3 weeks old. Am I looking at just a fluke or do I have a genetic problem? I already have 4 heifers bred to that bull for spring calves. I am asking for advice and any comments would be appreciated.<br>: Thanks<br>: Mack Powers<br>: XP Acres <p>
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Anonymous

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Mack,<p>Is the bull related to the cows he bred? Seems like I remember my father-in-law telling me this is a problem from inbreeding.<p>Robert
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Robert;<br> In response to your latest note, the answer is absolutely no relation. That happens to be one of my particular pet peeves. I have produced some pretty nice bulls and have had people say that I should keep them. If I did, I would have to start a new herd and I am not big enough for that. I had thought about that but knowing the bloodlines of my herd, I dismissed it immediately.<br>I do appreciate your input though. Some of the followups' suggested that the hoof problem was often related to assisted births. Not so in this case as both calves were born in the pasture totally unassisted. This was the 8th calf for one of the mothers and the 6th for the other. I am at a loss unless it is a genetic problem. I don't know that it is significant but the breed we are looking at is Brangus. The Bull and one of the cows are pure bred and the other cow is a commercial Brangus, at least 75%. Any other comments will be greatly appreciated.<br> Mack<p>: Mack,<p>: Is the bull related to the cows he bred? Seems like I remember my father-in-law telling me this is a problem from inbreeding.<p>: Robert<p>
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Two things come to mind with this problem. One is a condition known as tight tendons ( Not the technical term but accurate). This can happen when you have long legged calves developing in smaller cows. They just can't stretch while developing. This is quite common, but a pain. <p>The second option could be a mineral deficiency. This would be tough to diagnois. If you have a mineral available to the cows during pregnancy I wouldn't worry to much and put it down to the tight tendons.<p>Jason Trowbridge<br>Southern Angus Farms<br>Alberta Canada
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Hi,<p>You can take that calf to your vet and he can clip that lead tendon just above hoof and the foot will straighten out. Good Luck<p>Richard See<br>Soda Creek Ranch<br>Pennington, Texas<p><br>: Thanks for your comments. I am writing this in response to the things you have said. The first calf with the hoof problem, got his act together within a few days and is fine now. The second one is still walking on his right ankle approaching the fourth week. There is no bone fusion as someone suggested, because the foot will straighten out easily. We did splint the leg after about 10 days and left it on for 8 days. We took it off when we noticed that he was walking on his knee. Five days after removing the splint, he still walks on the "ankle" but when standing still, he does rest his leg up on the hoof. I am trying to take this as a good sign that he is on the mend. I appreciate your comments and am still open to further suggestions. My biggest concern is the genetic factor since I can't afford a new bull every year. I guess we will wait and see what the next few calves look like.<br>: Thanks Again<br>: Mack<p>: : I am a relative novice in the cattle business. Producing on average, about 10 calves per year for the past 11 years does not give me a large base but I have not had any hoof problems until this year. My herd of females for the most part is unchanged but I did change bulls last year. Of the 8 calves born this fall, I have had 2 born with the front feet turned back so that the calves walk on their "ankles". One of them straightened out after 3 or 4 days. The other one still has a problem with the right hoof at 3 weeks old. Am I looking at just a fluke or do I have a genetic problem? I already have 4 heifers bred to that bull for spring calves. I am asking for advice and any comments would be appreciated.<br>: : Thanks<br>: : Mack Powers<br>: : XP Acres <p><p>
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Anonymous

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Hi,<p>Take the calf to your vet and he can clip the lead tendon just above the hoof and the foot with straighten out. Good Luck<p>Richard See<br>Soda Creek Ranch<br>Pennington, Texas<p><br>: I am a relative novice in the cattle business. Producing on average, about 10 calves per year for the past 11 years does not give me a large base but I have not had any hoof problems until this year. My herd of females for the most part is unchanged but I did change bulls last year. Of the 8 calves born this fall, I have had 2 born with the front feet turned back so that the calves walk on their "ankles". One of them straightened out after 3 or 4 days. The other one still has a problem with the right hoof at 3 weeks old. Am I looking at just a fluke or do I have a genetic problem? I already have 4 heifers bred to that bull for spring calves. I am asking for advice and any comments would be appreciated.<br>: Thanks<br>: Mack Powers<br>: XP Acres <p>
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Anonymous

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(User Above)":270ad3go said:
: Mack,<br>: Like Mike, most of the calves I've had with this problem have been assisted births or premature. I stand the calf several times a day for 15-30 minutes with its legs in proper position. Be careful when straighting the ankles if they are tight because you will be stretching tendons and muscle. This may be the case after three weeks. I have heard of people putting on splints to correct this, but ask your vet before doing this or Vicki the vet may read this and advise you. Good luck.<p>: Robert<p>I had a calf this spring with the same problem. Both front ankle joints were stiff and he was walking on tip toes. Also the joints seemed to be enlarged including the knees. My vet said it was naval infection. Get them to the vet as soon as you notice it and get an antibiotic shot. Sometimes this and time will correct most of the problem.
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