Homozygous polled??

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Anonymous

When you breed a Homo Polled Bull to a horn Cows you will get a Polled calf or it will be also Homo Polled.
I'm a new Simmental Breeder and want to Inseminate with Jalapeno semen (ABS). I have purebred Cows, what can I expcet of horns and color.
 

dun

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Polled is hornless and has at least one polled gene.
Homozygous means two polled genes.
Double polled means that both parents were polled. Both parents could be heterozygous polled or homozygous polled, or one or the other could be either homozygous or heterozygous. They both could have passed a polled gene (homozygous) or one could pass a horn gene and one a polled gene (heterozygous)
 
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Anonymous

Just keep using homo polled bulls and you won't have to worry on your horned cows. As far as Jalapeno and color, what color are your cows?

He is a non-diluter so on black cows they will come either red or black unless the cows are homo black, then they will be black. He is not a spot remover so if they are out of traditional cows they can have some white on them.
 
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Anonymous

How much white will they keep? How much is "some white"?

I'm new with Simmies and even if I like Traditional color I will like them with less white.

amazed":ms5566ec said:
Just keep using homo polled bulls and you won't have to worry on your horned cows. As far as Jalapeno and color, what color are your cows?

He is a non-diluter so on black cows they will come either red or black unless the cows are homo black, then they will be black. He is not a spot remover so if they are out of traditional cows they can have some white on them.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

How much white will they keep? How much is "some white"?

I'm new with Simmies and even if I like Traditional color I will like them with less white.

amazed":1qy2n0bb said:
Just keep using homo polled bulls and you won't have to worry on your horned cows. As far as Jalapeno and color, what color are your cows?

He is a non-diluter so on black cows they will come either red or black unless the cows are homo black, then they will be black. He is not a spot remover so if they are out of traditional cows they can have some white on them.
 

A. delaGarza

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Does Jalapeno has a Black gene? Black Max is his Dam's Sire, so if it has a Black gene you will have the posibility of having a Black calve.


amazed":37ts16wn said:
Just keep using homo polled bulls and you won't have to worry on your horned cows. As far as Jalapeno and color, what color are your cows?

He is a non-diluter so on black cows they will come either red or black unless the cows are homo black, then they will be black. He is not a spot remover so if they are out of traditional cows they can have some white on them.
 

dun

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An animal that is heterozygous black, one black gene will be black. To be red, it must be homozygous red, two red genes, no black genes. But that doesn't address white or spotting

dun
 

txag

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A. delaGarza":2a9zrpnt said:
very confuse

dun":2a9zrpnt said:
An animal that is heterozygous black, one black gene will be black. To be red, it must be homozygous red, two red genes, no black genes. But that doesn't address white or spotting

dun

at each loci, there are two genes. if both genes are the same, it is homozygous. if the genes are different, it is heterozygous.

black is dominant & we'll use "B" for black & "b" for non-black. if an animal is homozygous black, it has two black genes, BB. if an animal is heterozygous black, it has a black gene and a non-black gene, Bb. Both animals will be black in color but when crossed, the homozygous black animal (BB) can only pass on the black color gene (all his offspring will be black). The heterozygous black animal (Bb) can pass either the black gene or the non-black gene. Statistically, half the time he will pass on the black gene & half of the time, the non-black. If he is bred to homozygous black females (BB), all the offspring will still be black because the females are only passing on black color, but half of the offspring will carry the non-black gene (they will still appear black). If he is bred to heterozygous females, 1/4 of the offspring will be homozyous black, 1/2 will be heterozygous black (so 3/4 will appear black) & 1/4 will be homozygous non-black.

Spots & diluters are determined by genes at other loci & can affect the coloring.

Hope this helps clear up some confusion & didn't create more.
 

A. delaGarza

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I get ti but see the other topic of jalapeno.
txag":qa7le8w0 said:
A. delaGarza":qa7le8w0 said:
very confuse

dun":qa7le8w0 said:
An animal that is heterozygous black, one black gene will be black. To be red, it must be homozygous red, two red genes, no black genes. But that doesn't address white or spotting

dun

at each loci, there are two genes. if both genes are the same, it is homozygous. if the genes are different, it is heterozygous.

black is dominant & we'll use "B" for black & "b" for non-black. if an animal is homozygous black, it has two black genes, BB. if an animal is heterozygous black, it has a black gene and a non-black gene, Bb. Both animals will be black in color but when crossed, the homozygous black animal (BB) can only pass on the black color gene (all his offspring will be black). The heterozygous black animal (Bb) can pass either the black gene or the non-black gene. Statistically, half the time he will pass on the black gene & half of the time, the non-black. If he is bred to homozygous black females (BB), all the offspring will still be black because the females are only passing on black color, but half of the offspring will carry the non-black gene (they will still appear black). If he is bred to heterozygous females, 1/4 of the offspring will be homozyous black, 1/2 will be heterozygous black (so 3/4 will appear black) & 1/4 will be homozygous non-black.

Spots & diluters are determined by genes at other loci & can affect the coloring.

Hope this helps clear up some confusion & didn't create more.
 

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