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Home Schooling the way to go?

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Does anybody have experience w/ home schooling? I am really considering it! I can handle my son (he's 5) saying a cuss word here and there...but when he come's home from school talking like he's in a porn movie...I tend to get a little pissy!
 

HOSS

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show time,

it worked for us. My daughter was homeschooled up until her sophmore year in high school. She decided that she wanted to go to public school so that she could get more involved in drama and choir. They found that she was way ahead of her peers so they moved her up a grade. She graduated HS at 16 with a 3.95 gpa and took all honors and AP courses. She said that the HS curriculum was so much easier than her home school requirements. She is now a 17 year old freshman at MTSU majoring in both Political Science and Spanish on an academic scholarship.

My son has never been to public school. He has always been home schooled. He is 15 now but is way ahead of his cousins that go to public school and they are a year older. He is very involved in Babe Ruth baseball and this summer will be his last. He says he may want to go to HS so that he can play HS ball.

One advantage that we have is that my wife is a former grade school teacher. She quit to be able to teach our kids at home when the public school system that we were in at the time was pushing the Heather has Two Mommies agenda as well as having militant PETA activists holding special assemblies during school (long story here but I almost got arrested over this).

The key is having the discipline to set a regular schedule. Being wishy washy about school times etc.. will just be a catastrophe. It has to be regimented just like real school. Social interaction is important also. We made sure our kids participated in library book clubs, little league, softball and lots of things like church youth banquets, weenie roasts, hayrides etc..

Homeschool is not for everybody and for the most part public school is a good thing but most homeschooled children that we know through the local homeschool co-ops, are very bright, well rounded and on their way to successfull lives.
 

blackcowz

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Yes, it's the way to go! I love it. Just started my second semester of High School today. It is an awesome program, and certainly the way to keep a hold of your children and being able to train them up in the way they should go.
 

CattleHand

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I think it depends on the schools around you. I went to public school. I personally don't think I'm a dummy haha. As for learning bad language that can be solved at the home. Child should know those words aren't tolerated. As far as curriculum goes, I feel that a lot of the stuff you gain in High School is beyond the knowledge/teaching abilities of my parents. My brother will graduate from public H.S. this semester. He will have taken three years of computer science (all three can count towards college credit), and will also have completed the first 2 years of calculus. (He is smarter than me so I thought he would be a good example of how the resources in public schools can really aid an education). I also think public school socializes you more which has its pros and cons of course.
HOSS probably had a good system if you want to teach them while they are young, but I think when they are high school age there are more resources (at least at our school) than there would of been at home. Just my two cents :tiphat: . Now I have to get back to studying so my younger brother and I wont be in the same classes when he comes to college :dunce: .
 

Ryder

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HOSS":1634trsz said:
show time,

it worked for us. My daughter was homeschooled up until her sophmore year in high school. She decided that she wanted to go to public school so that she could get more involved in drama and choir. They found that she was way ahead of her peers so they moved her up a grade. She graduated HS at 16 with a 3.95 gpa and took all honors and AP courses. She said that the HS curriculum was so much easier than her home school requirements. She is now a 17 year old freshman at MTSU majoring in both Political Science and Spanish on an academic scholarship.

My son has never been to public school. He has always been home schooled. He is 15 now but is way ahead of his cousins that go to public school and they are a year older. He is very involved in Babe Ruth baseball and this summer will be his last. He says he may want to go to HS so that he can play HS ball.

One advantage that we have is that my wife is a former grade school teacher. She quit to be able to teach our kids at home when the public school system that we were in at the time was pushing the Heather has Two Mommies agenda as well as having militant PETA activists holding special assemblies during school (long story here but I almost got arrested over this).

The key is having the discipline to set a regular schedule. Being wishy washy about school times etc.. will just be a catastrophe. It has to be regimented just like real school. Social interaction is important also. We made sure our kids participated in library book clubs, little league, softball and lots of things like church youth banquets, weenie roasts, hayrides etc..

Homeschool is not for everybody and for the most part public school is a good thing but most homeschooled children that we know through the local homeschool co-ops, are very bright, well rounded and on their way to successfull lives.
:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
 

Lammie

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Around here, home schooling is a joke. You have to take into consideration the huge task you are about to undertake. I would never do it and I think I am a lot more qualified than most people who choose to do it around here. I don't want cookie cutter versions of myself. My kids need the diversity of learning from different people, not just me.

Having said that, if you can coop with other home school parents it might work. Anyone here can do it, and that's the shame of it. It is not regulated at all. I knew parents whose version of school was having their kid read for a while and then letting them run around in the yard the rest of the day. I think there is a balance between your desires and goals for your children and what you are capable to teaching them as a parent.
 

dun

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I've known kids that were home schooled and some that are still in the process. About half of them have turned out to be really great young people and about half are turds just like their parents. That's probably about the same percentages for kids that have not been home schooled
 

backhoeboogie

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The biggest con I see is that SOME home schooled kids never learn to deal with the main stream public. It seems to me that social skills are not developed or perhaps their parents have weak social skills.

The little controlled get togethers home schooled children partake in are not enough. They need to know how to deal with idiots in real life because they are going to encounter them. Sooner or later a lot of them.
 

Lammie

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Well said, BHB.

I'd never undertake to do this. I think it is better to be involved with your kid's school and change from within. An involved parent can get a lot accomplished. If you don't like it that your son is bringing home nasty words, then say something about it to his teacher and the principal and keep on it. Volunteer. Go to school board meetings. Make yourself visible.

It is those parents whose children have a better public school experience.
 

novatech

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backhoeboogie":1dfrjjbj said:
The biggest con I see is that SOME home schooled kids never learn to deal with the main stream public. It seems to me that social skills are not developed or perhaps their parents have weak social skills.

The little controlled get togethers home schooled children partake in are not enough. They need to know how to deal with idiots in real life because they are going to encounter them. Sooner or later a lot of them.
I totally agree. I have a daughter that was home schooled. She is now off in college. Biggest pain in the B I have ever herd. Cannot deal with other people especially the dominant ones. Everytime she has a social problem we get a phone call. 19 year old genius afraid to come out of her room.
Teach your kid right from wrong and how to deal with others starting now. Keep them busy in programs associating with the right kind of kids. The end result will still end up being how they make choices. Not the choices you make for them.
 
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Lammie":rpeebd5j said:
Well said, BHB.

I'd never undertake to do this. I think it is better to be involved with your kid's school and change from within. An involved parent can get a lot accomplished. If you don't like it that your son is bringing home nasty words, then say something about it to his teacher and the principal and keep on it. Volunteer. Go to school board meetings. Make yourself visible.

It is those parents whose children have a better public school experience.

Lammie, I volunteer at the school 3-4 days per wk. The staff know's what is going on, but it is not stopping. A couply of weeks ago a little boy in my son's class called my 4 yr old daughter a b#@!%. My son comes home saying Hey hot lips, nice a#@, Johnny said he's gonna have sex with Jane, etc. This is not OKAY in my book! I explain to him how we don't talk like that, then he come's home w/ a new nasty saying. He only rode on the bus two times this year b/c it was sooo bad! My total drive time to get him to and from school and back home for me is over 1 hour everyday.

I did all of my son's pre-schooling and he was ahead of most of the other kid's at screening. In fact he is still ahead of the other kids but he is being held back b/c the others are just learning everything now for the first time. He has started reading at home, but at school they are still learning ABC's! So at this point, I'm not seeing many good reason's to keep him in public school....and it's not like I shelter my kids in the house all the time, they are very active and have a lot of good friends.
 

Chris H

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dun":1bp4wfa5 said:
I've known kids that were home schooled and some that are still in the process. About half of them have turned out to be really great young people and about half are turds just like their parents. That's probably about the same percentages for kids that have not been home schooled

That sums it up very well.

Showtime, have you checked out some forums that are for homeschoolers? You will find a lot of helpful information there. I particularly like http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/.
 

TexasBred

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Homeschooling only works if you're smarter, wiser, harder working and more determined than the kids you're trying to teach. By that age they probably already know all you're weaknesses so YOU start out behind.
 

Lammie

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show time":1onekljg said:
Lammie":1onekljg said:
Well said, BHB.

I'd never undertake to do this. I think it is better to be involved with your kid's school and change from within. An involved parent can get a lot accomplished. If you don't like it that your son is bringing home nasty words, then say something about it to his teacher and the principal and keep on it. Volunteer. Go to school board meetings. Make yourself visible.

It is those parents whose children have a better public school experience.

Lammie, I volunteer at the school 3-4 days per wk. The staff know's what is going on, but it is not stopping. A couply of weeks ago a little boy in my son's class called my 4 yr old daughter a b#@!%. My son comes home saying Hey hot lips, nice a#@, Johnny said he's gonna have sex with Jane, etc. This is not OKAY in my book! I explain to him how we don't talk like that, then he come's home w/ a new nasty saying. He only rode on the bus two times this year b/c it was sooo bad! My total drive time to get him to and from school and back home for me is over 1 hour everyday.

I did all of my son's pre-schooling and he was ahead of most of the other kid's at screening. In fact he is still ahead of the other kids but he is being held back b/c the others are just learning everything now for the first time. He has started reading at home, but at school they are still learning ABC's! So at this point, I'm not seeing many good reason's to keep him in public school....and it's not like I shelter my kids in the house all the time, they are very active and have a lot of good friends.


If you go to the Principal today and tell him or her that you are going to withdraw your child from school unless the language is dealt with and NOW, he or she will do something. Schools lose federal $$ every time a kid leaves. About 8k per student, here at the high school level. If enough parents do this, there will be results.

Your child needs more and different teaching. I don't know if there is GT at that age, but he needs advanced reading and writing. Have him put into a different class. See if he can't be tested and promoted.

Let the powers that be at your school know that you are not satisfied with the discipline for some students who use bad words. I had to do this when my son was a third grader. There was a kid who was so disruptive the teacher could not teach. One kid was ruining the whole learning experience for the rest of the class. I whined about it long enough that they did something with him. He was BAD, too. And I know from bad. My son loved school but all he could talk about was that kid and his antics.

I also had my older son transferred to another Kindergarten class when I saw his teacher yank him by the arm because he was upset that he could not find his jacket. He was five.

Go in, be assertive and tell them what's bothering you and what you propose to do about it. I bet you are not alone here.
 

LimousinGirl

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Go for it!! It WILL be so worth it. Coming from a Homeschool almost Graduate, ( :) ) I love it--and I wouldn't have it any other way. Personally, I think there's no better person to teach them then the kids own Mom.
 

Frankie

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show time":e0anbgz5 said:
Does anybody have experience w/ home schooling? I am really considering it! I can handle my son (he's 5) saying a cuss word here and there...but when he come's home from school talking like he's in a porn movie...I tend to get a little be nice!

We have a neighbor who homeschooled. They're beautiful, polite, wonderful children, but none of the girls have jobs. They're 21, 20, 18 and 16 years old now. At least one of them has learning disabilities and got no special ed. I wonder what will become of them if no man comes along and marries them? Yet another family not far from us homeschooled their two sons and both wound up with full college scholarships. (The mother is a certified school teacher.) One of the boys is an attorney now. Another former neighbor homeschooled her son until he was a junior in high school. Then she realized he needed Physics, Calculus, Biology labs, etc., to go on and get the degree he wanted so he went back to regular school.

So I think it depends on what you're willing/able to teach them.

Unless you keep your kids at home all the time, they're going to hear things you don't like and repeat them. IMO, it's up to you to explain right and wrong to them.
 

Lammie

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Frankie":k8cm8p00 said:
show time":k8cm8p00 said:
Does anybody have experience w/ home schooling? I am really considering it! I can handle my son (he's 5) saying a cuss word here and there...but when he come's home from school talking like he's in a porn movie...I tend to get a little be nice!

We have a neighbor who homeschooled. They're beautiful, polite, wonderful children, but none of the girls have jobs. They're 21, 20, 18 and 16 years old now. At least one of them has learning disabilities and got no special ed. I wonder what will become of them if no man comes along and marries them? Yet another family not far from us homeschooled their two sons and both wound up with full college scholarships. (The mother is a certified school teacher.) One of the boys is an attorney now. Another former neighbor homeschooled her son until he was a junior in high school. Then she realized he needed Physics, Calculus, Biology labs, etc., to go on and get the degree he wanted so he went back to regular school.

So I think it depends on what you're willing/able to teach them.

Unless you keep your kids at home all the time, they're going to hear things you don't like and repeat them. IMO, it's up to you to explain right and wrong to them.

:clap:

At five years of age and younger, kids experiment with language and that sometimes means saying things to see what sort of reaction he or she will get.

Of course, some kids have potty mouthed parents and they won't see anything wrong with their kids' language, but generally speakng, setting your own children straight about what it and is not acceptable language at home, then holding them to that is the way to deal with foul language. It is all part of the learning process. He's being exposed to all kinds of things he's never experienced at home. He has to learn how to process that within the confines of his own situation and he will look to you as an example. Frankie is right. He will hear and see and DO things you will not be proud of sometimes.
He won't either. The language thing will pass.

As for the early learning you have provided, studies show that by the time kids reach third grade, the kids who were early readers will be at the same pace with the late starters because they will naturally catch up to one another and level out. I used to tell that to parents who wanted their kids to read as three year olds. It isn't developmentally appropriate at that age, and although it is great if you can do it, it won't necessarily indicate that your child is gifted.

Since you have provided your child with a firm background in reading, and good for you, he will still be able to be with his classmates, and maybe be out in a GT situation while you continue to encourage him at home. He won't go backwards if he has your encouragement, I promise.

I had some time to think about this as you can tell.

You should still address the language issue with the staff and visit it often. I bet his teacher is having the same hard time as you in are at home.

Young children need that socialization. There are certainly good and bad public schools, but I think it would be a shame to give up on it so early in his life. Stick it out until the end of the semester and that way you can have summer to prepare should you decide to homeschool.
 

Chris H

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Lammie":3elwq6oh said:
As for the early learning you have provided, studies show that by the time kids reach third grade, the kids who were early readers will be at the same pace with the late starters because they will naturally catch up to one another and level out. I used to tell that to parents who wanted their kids to read as three year olds. It isn't developmentally appropriate at that age, and although it is great if you can do it, it won't necessarily indicate that your child is gifted.

That's the biggest bunch of bull propagated by educators who achieve that claim by holding back children. I read at 3-4 because I was determined to read, so it was "developmentally appropriate". I have a daughter and now a grandson who are the same way. The grandson is 9, in the 4th grade, and reads at a 12th grade level.
 

Howdyjabo

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Home Schooling became very clicky around here 25 years ago- Lots of kids my sons age were home schooled.
And I have seen the outcomes from about 14 homes and 35 kids.

It was real easy to spot the common factors of how well it worked.

The Moms that kept the kids home to keep control of them- IT FAILED MISERABLY (smart useless kids)
Those that just wanted to control their education it worked great.

Public education is the saving grace for kids with control freak parents. Problem is that control freak parents don't realize that they are and no one can tell them that they are.
 

rockridgecattle

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We have friends who chose to homeschool their children. We live on the edge of the earth in Manitoba. They have tried several curiculems. (sp). The parents are involved in the schooling, and know what they are taught. Early on, starting in kindergarten, she taught them all but math, and her husband taught the math. Now that they are older, they use DVD's from a Christian School in the states. These DVD's teach with a teacher in a class. The parents know what they are taught and how they are taught. This is really imporant to them. They do really well and are well adjusted kids, but they are adjusted well because they are also in 4H, piano, dance, and something else, oh yeah youth group. So they get the social aspect of growing up. It is a well rounded education.

We also have friends who homeschooled and they have a pile of kids. They did not get involved in things outside the family except for church, so they were a little inververted. As well, they were not so inclined to work hard at school, and had to play catch up quite a bit.
I think if we had the option (if we had kids), we would home school them and get them involved in extra "after school" programs to teach them how to interact with others.
 
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