holstein bull calves

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Anonymous

Does anyone on this list buy holstein bull calves and feed them out as steers? I work on a dairy and can get the bull calves straight from them. I would still be paying for them, but I could pay for them in labor instead of money. I would be interested in hearing what information that you may have, both good and bad. Thanks for your time and I look forward to hearing responses.

Take care, Benjamin



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Anonymous

> Does anyone on this list buy
> holstein bull calves and feed them
> out as steers? I work on a dairy
> and can get the bull calves
> straight from them. I would still
> be paying for them, but I could
> pay for them in labor instead of
> money. I would be interested in
> hearing what information that you
> may have, both good and bad.
> Thanks for your time and I look
> forward to hearing responses.

> Take care, Benjamin

Benjamin: I used to think Holsteins would produce poorier quality meat than beef breeds, but I know better now. When I moved to Wisconsin six years ago and found that most of the fed cattle were Holsteins, I almost fell out. Not only are the fed cattle Holsteins but most beef served in restaurants is also Holstein. The beef is great. It is juicy, tender and very flavorful. The reason the dairy cattle are discounted at the sale barn is because they require more time (30-60 days more) to feed the cattle to finish. Of course that is an ecomonic factor that must be adjusted for, thus the discount. In your case, I would feed them. Good luck,



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Anonymous

I have a neighbor that does the same thing, plus he gets the feed from the dairy and works it off also. He looks at as a savings account, if he figured his labor at anything for the direct calf care it would be a wash.

dun

> Does anyone on this list buy
> holstein bull calves and feed them
> out as steers? I work on a dairy
> and can get the bull calves
> straight from them. I would still
> be paying for them, but I could
> pay for them in labor instead of
> money. I would be interested in
> hearing what information that you
> may have, both good and bad.
> Thanks for your time and I look
> forward to hearing responses.

> Take care, Benjamin



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OP
A

Anonymous

we raise a few as steers a year we buy in late winter and spring and sell them in the fall, this way you only have to feed grain and the hay in winter months and spring they have all the grass to eat.. We make money on them.Just not alot it's like saving to us. the only bad thing I can think of is that sometimes they get scours,,but you work on a dairy farm you probably deal with all the issues with the heifers they keep...In my opinion they are worth the trouble we have been buying the calves for $75.00 3 days old and selling them for .70 to .75cents a pound
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Ben,

I have been buying and raising holstein steers for awhile now and would have to tell you to go for it absolutely... The one fear I have buying the 3 day calves is did the owner let the calf suckle long enough to get that first colostrum from his mothers milk... If you are working there you can monitor that yourself.. beef buyers love to buy the holstien steers the meat is more marbled than many beef breeds, but the price per pound is lower because the holstien carcuss is much larger than beef breeds... still, it is worth the trouble raise them.. I can usually get them here in Mississippi for around $40 a pop and sell for 70 to 80 cents a pound in a few months.. also you might consider buying on of the old nurse cow from your dairy.. that is the only way to go in my opinion...

> Does anyone on this list buy
> holstein bull calves and feed them
> out as steers? I work on a dairy
> and can get the bull calves
> straight from them. I would still
> be paying for them, but I could
> pay for them in labor instead of
> money. I would be interested in
> hearing what information that you
> may have, both good and bad.
> Thanks for your time and I look
> forward to hearing responses.

> Take care, Benjamin
 

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