High Pressure Fencing

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draagyn

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We are in the process of adding calving pens in our barn with an attached calving yard. We currently have 5 black angus cows and are keeping the heifers for breeding. We ran into issues last year with 4’ wire fences and deep snow during calving season. Going to build all wood pens and fence in high pressure areas. Was thinking 5-6” by 9’ posts 3’ in 6’ out with board rails. 8’ post spacing with 16’ boards overlapping seams. Any suggestions welcome. Also wondering if 24’ free standing panels would work good in high pressure. Thank you.
 

simme

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Take a look at what is called "continuous fencing". Here is an example of the concept.
https://hpcattlesupply.com/product/hpcs-1-25-continuous-fence-20-length-14-gauge-14-5-spacing/
You would install your posts and then attach these panels to your posts. I think there are couplers on the ends to lock them together. May be less maintenance and stronger than wood boards.

I would use 10 foot posts instead of 9 and try to get close to 4 feet in the ground for high pressure areas.
 

Dave

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simme said:
Take a look at what is called "continuous fencing". Here is an example of the concept.
https://hpcattlesupply.com/product/hpcs-1-25-continuous-fence-20-length-14-gauge-14-5-spacing/
You would install your posts and then attach these panels to your posts. I think there are couplers on the ends to lock them together. May be less maintenance and stronger than wood boards.

I would use 10 foot posts instead of 9 and try to get close to 4 feet in the ground for high pressure areas.
Depending on where the OP is located on the cost. I hear people here talking about that continuous fence but I never see it at the stores or out in use around here. And rough cut lumber from one of the smaller mills can be plenty strong with very little maintenance. I agree with the 10 foot posts. I just never see them in odd numbers, just 8's or 10's. I do have a bunch of 9 foot RR ties but the local livestock supply hunts them up on purpose.
 

SBMF 2015

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Depending on your budget and material availability. I would use hedge (Osage Orange) or pipe posts and guard rail. It's an investment and it will last forever.
I use some continuous fence, but not where I sort or crowd.
 

greybeard

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Depending on where the OP is located on the cost. I hear people here talking about that continuous fence but I never see it at the stores or out in use around here. And rough cut lumber from one of the smaller mills can be plenty strong with very little maintenance. I agree with the 10 foot posts. I just never see them in odd numbers, just 8's or 10's. I do have a bunch of 9 foot RR ties but the local livestock supply hunts them up on purpose.
It's my understanding, that 9' ties are used in curves of the track. I guess they do come in different lengths. I had a truckload of ties and about 1/2 of them measured 104" ..8ft 8 inches.
 

Atimm693

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Continuous panels work okay. Just depends on how crazy your cows are.

I have had problems with the corners breaking out, especially in areas that we like to sort. Calves especially will stick their heads under it and break the bottom pipe trying to crawl under.

You will also need to add a top rail to get the height needed to discourage jumping.
 

Lee VanRoss

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I have used 5' cattle panels with rubber elevator flights between panel and post (wood or fibre) for insulation. You will need to go
underground or over the top at the gate openings. With an 8 or 10 joule fencer they will learn very fast to stay away from the panels.
PS Use insulated washers on the lag heads. Be sure panel is not grounded any place. You may have other applications that will work.
Never tried it but I would not be afraid to try electifying a section of snow fence in an emergency (the old painted red slat kind) for a
short run. Good Luck!
 

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