Herf Bull Pic

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El_Putzo

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It's been a while since I've posted, but I figured I should toss you guys some fresh meat. Give me your thoughts on this guy. He's about 8 1/2 months old in this pic. 610 Adj WW, 84 lb BW. He's a Feltons Domino 774 son out of a Boomer 29F cow. I'm sure he's got several flaws, including the lack of pigment on the eyes and scrotum, so give me some more constructive criticism.

11U.jpg


Here's a link to his info:

http://www.herfnet.com/online/cgi-bin/i ... 3&9=525359
 

JHH

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":1bufj2ix said:
Appears to have decent depth and spring of rib. Don't like his fine bones & he appears to be pinched behind the shoulders and carrying it up over the topline.

I think we are seeing the same thing but I say he breaks behind the front shoulders? Giving the top line problems?
 
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El_Putzo

El_Putzo

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Thanks for the replies so far, but with 175 views and only 2 replies, I know there must be a few more opinions out there. I agree with your comments so far, although I don't think I'd call him fine boned, just not heavy boned. And yes, his topline is not exactly perfect, although this pose doesn't do much for him. He wasn't being very cooperative on picture day.

Dun, I know you're out there, how does he stack up against your 774 progeny?

Keep 'em coming ;-)
 

Baldie Maker

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not to cut him down, but I wouldn't wanna compare him to 774 progency.. he's a faternal brother to the likes of ozzie, legend, and several a.i. sires.
 

Herefords.US

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Looks to me to be one of those bull calves that will change a lot in the next 3-4 months with adequate feed. A "late bloomer"! Post some more pictures in a few months.

George
 

KNERSIE

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Herefords.US":1ljqen9q said:
Looks to me to be one of those bull calves that will change a lot in the next 3-4 months with adequate feed. A "late bloomer"! Post some more pictures in a few months.

George

Just ask yourself this... Do you want your bulls to sire weaners like this for your commercial customers?

Just remember the commercial farmer are getting paid for what the calves look like at weaning time, not for what they MIGHT look like IF they are indeed late bloomers and PERHAPS do well on feed. Also bear in mind that the commercial cows are very likely to have some of the same faults this calf has.

To be very direct with no intention of being rude, this isn't a bull prospect, he will make a very average steer. His pasterns are too upright, his shoulders too straight, lacks spring of rib and depth, weak over the top, short hipped, poor tailset, light bone and a very steeply sloped hip. At 8 1/2 months a bullcalf should look like a BULL calf and not like a steer, especially his head is very feminine with poor eyes. His testes does look promising from what I can see.

He may be a late bloomer and fat will hide alot of faults to a certain extent, but all the fat and feed in the world isn't going to up his inherited quality.
 

BC

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I would steer this bull yearling. My take on him is he is not masculine enough about the head, he is weak in the crops (right behind the shoulders), is too refined in his bone, drops off too much from hooks to pin bones and needs more muscling in his stifle. As stated earlier, a commercial cattleman sells his calves on weight and their perception of muscling and the ability to grow.
 

Herefords.US

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KNERSIE":3crnqkt7 said:
Herefords.US":3crnqkt7 said:
Looks to me to be one of those bull calves that will change a lot in the next 3-4 months with adequate feed. A "late bloomer"! Post some more pictures in a few months.

George

Just ask yourself this... Do you want your bulls to sire weaners like this for your commercial customers?

Just remember the commercial farmer are getting paid for what the calves look like at weaning time, not for what they MIGHT look like IF they are indeed late bloomers and PERHAPS do well on feed. Also bear in mind that the commercial cows are very likely to have some of the same faults this calf has.

To be very direct with no intention of being rude, this isn't a bull prospect, he will make a very average steer. His pasterns are too upright, his shoulders too straight, lacks spring of rib and depth, weak over the top, short hipped, poor tailset, light bone and a very steeply sloped hip. At 8 1/2 months a bullcalf should look like a BULL calf and not like a steer, especially his head is very feminine with poor eyes. His testes does look promising from what I can see.

He may be a late bloomer and fat will hide alot of faults to a certain extent, but all the fat and feed in the world isn't going to up his inherited quality.

Knersie, I'll preface this by admitting that you are likely a better judge than I am and may be able to see more than I can see. But I'm not ready to completely condemn this calf on this single picture alone. I'd like to see some others from different angles first. Your criticism of his head I can agree with, but I've seen a lot of 774s whose head I didn't like, including 774's own. In my view, that kinda comes with that territory.

Also bear in mind when I say "feed", I do not necessarily mean "grain". This calf has the overall "lanky" look of many I've seen who are coming out of a sparse winter - including some of my own this year. I'd still like to see him in a few months - after some time on lush pasture - or even on grain - or some of both.

George
 

HerefordSire

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I would take a guess and say even though posters providing expert opinions have a high probability of being accurate, the true value could be in storing the genes in a live animal (deferring realization of value). Both the CS Boomer (appearance) and the 774 (high composite indices) genetic material could be worth quite a bit of money in the future. In my view, you are likely to stumble across an animal worth a tidy sum by breeding this one for future generations. It is very possible to breed greatness by alternating generation output. For example, Michael Jordan's son may not outperform Michael, but his grandson very well could. The otherside of the coin would be Bobby Bonds and his son Barry Bonds although Bobby's life abruptly ended at an early stage of greatness.
 

KNERSIE

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HerefordSire":1u79vbvq said:
I would take a guess and say even though posters providing expert opinions have a high probability of being accurate, the true value could be in storing the genes in a live animal (deferring realization of value). Both the CS Boomer (appearance) and the 774 (high composite indices) genetic material could be worth quite a bit of money in the future. In my view, you are likely to stumble across an animal worth a tidy sum by breeding this one for future generations. It is very possible to breed greatness by alternating generation output. For example, Michael Jordan's son may not outperform Michael, but his grandson very well could. The otherside of the coin would be Bobby Bonds and his son Barry Bonds although Bobby's life abruptly ended at an early stage of greatness.

This reminds me that I need to take a photo of a bull taking a crap.
 

HerefordSire

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El_Putzo....also, he looks like he could perform better than the cows you have if the cow you bred 774 to is your cow average.
 

alacattleman

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KNERSIE":3si1bacl said:
HerefordSire":3si1bacl said:
I would take a guess and say even though posters providing expert opinions have a high probability of being accurate, the true value could be in storing the genes in a live animal (deferring realization of value). Both the CS Boomer (appearance) and the 774 (high composite indices) genetic material could be worth quite a bit of money in the future. In my view, you are likely to stumble across an animal worth a tidy sum by breeding this one for future generations. It is very possible to breed greatness by alternating generation output. For example, Michael Jordan's son may not outperform Michael, but his grandson very well could. The otherside of the coin would be Bobby Bonds and his son Barry Bonds although Bobby's life abruptly ended at an early stage of greatness.

This reminds me that I need to take a photo of a bull taking a crap.
let me do it, i seem to have perfect timing
 

blackcowz

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KNERSIE":pbri6c3q said:
HerefordSire":pbri6c3q said:
I would take a guess and say even though posters providing expert opinions have a high probability of being accurate, the true value could be in storing the genes in a live animal (deferring realization of value). Both the CS Boomer (appearance) and the 774 (high composite indices) genetic material could be worth quite a bit of money in the future. In my view, you are likely to stumble across an animal worth a tidy sum by breeding this one for future generations. It is very possible to breed greatness by alternating generation output. For example, Michael Jordan's son may not outperform Michael, but his grandson very well could. The otherside of the coin would be Bobby Bonds and his son Barry Bonds although Bobby's life abruptly ended at an early stage of greatness.

This reminds me that I need to take a photo of a bull taking a crap.

Not to stir the pot, but this reminded me of this little picture. I think we ought to get Macon to add it to the smiley section. Hope it works.
cowpoosmiley.gif
 

KNERSIE

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blackcowz":12vq06gj said:
KNERSIE":12vq06gj said:
HerefordSire":12vq06gj said:
I would take a guess and say even though posters providing expert opinions have a high probability of being accurate, the true value could be in storing the genes in a live animal (deferring realization of value). Both the CS Boomer (appearance) and the 774 (high composite indices) genetic material could be worth quite a bit of money in the future. In my view, you are likely to stumble across an animal worth a tidy sum by breeding this one for future generations. It is very possible to breed greatness by alternating generation output. For example, Michael Jordan's son may not outperform Michael, but his grandson very well could. The otherside of the coin would be Bobby Bonds and his son Barry Bonds although Bobby's life abruptly ended at an early stage of greatness.

This reminds me that I need to take a photo of a bull taking a crap.

Not to stir the pot, but this reminded me of this little picture. I think we ought to get Macon to add it to the smiley section. Hope it works.
cowpoosmiley.gif

That is the emoticon I've been looking for for ages!
 

aussie_cowgirl

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There is some truth in HS's monologue about genes there. My grandmothers on both sides are red heads, My mother is dark brunette and my father is a blonde. And voila, I'm a red head. So the gene skipped a generation. But the folly with all this is I can't pass on my amazing shade of hair colour *cough cough* unless I 'mate' with someome who also IS a redhead or carries the gene. Hanging onto recessive genes in hope is silly.
 
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