Hereford who is black

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cbcr

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If you look at the Simmental, Gelbvieh, Limousin, Maine-Anjou with there Angus hybrids, the thing that we disagree with on those is that they are not of a set breed percentage. As long as the animal has at least 25% of the breed, the rest can be any percentage of Angus that you like.

How can any of the bulls with the varying breed x Angus percentage be consistent?

No, a Black Hereford that is considered an F2 may not be consistent, but how is he any different that any of the other breed x Angus crosses that breeders are using?
 

ALACOWMAN

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cbcr said:
No, a Black Hereford that is considered an F2 may not be consistent, but how is he any different that any of the other breed x Angus crosses that breeders are using?
the only way too find out is too use him..on him you are gambling on looks alone ..looking good,and producing good..is a heck of a combination. And I'm not talking born with a white face and black hide Im talking performance..hope he works for him..
 

Caustic Burno

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cbcr said:
If you look at the Simmental, Gelbvieh, Limousin, Maine-Anjou with there Angus hybrids, the thing that we disagree with on those is that they are not of a set breed percentage. As long as the animal has at least 25% of the breed, the rest can be any percentage of Angus that you like.

How can any of the bulls with the varying breed x Angus percentage be consistent?

No, a Black Hereford that is considered an F2 may not be consistent, but how is he any different that any of the other breed x Angus crosses that breeders are using?

It’s all a con job that most have bit hook line and sinker for black hide versus quality.
The Angus breeders are as guilty as the other con artist selling anything with papers as seed stock.
 
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He's 21 months old now. I liked him as a yearling but then his growth slowed down. After we see how well his calves come out he might become a heifer bull.
 

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Warren Allison

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Thanks, he is pretty thick. He's 75% hereford. Since he's out of an F1 and a purebred sire is he considered an F2?
Black Herefords are their own breed, and have their own registry. The are 5/8ths Hereford and 3/8ths Angus. You don't have a Black Hereford unless you have a calf out of a reg. BH cow sired by a reg BH bull. Anything else is just a black baldy, a Hereford x Angus cross
 

Lee VanRoss

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A good calf of any color in the 1st 30 days of the calving season beats almost any color including black after 60 days..
For my money (and no one has to agree) fertility and not color is the #1 profit trait.
 
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A good calf of any color in the 1st 30 days of the calving season beats almost any color including black after 60 days..
For my money (and no one has to agree) fertility and not color is the #1 profit trait.
Yes. I forget who it was on a Working Cows Podcast figured 40% of our profits depend on if a cow gets bred or not.
 
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Black Herefords are their own breed, and have their own registry. The are 5/8ths Hereford and 3/8ths Angus. You don't have a Black Hereford unless you have a calf out of a reg. BH cow sired by a reg BH bull. Anything else is just a black baldy, a Hereford x Angus cross
I know. These are his papers.
 

Son of Butch

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Black herfs have made their way up to Alberta. I've read countless comments making fun of them but I thought I'd give this guy a try because calves like him sell well in my area. He was born last May and was developed on green feed and alfalfa. Give me your honest opinions.


Honest opinion - nice animal and I'd guess him as 5/8 angus 3/8 hereford
 

BFE

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He's 21 months old now. I liked him as a yearling but then his growth slowed down. After we see how well his calves come out he might become a heifer bull.
We need more pictures of him and that nice looking (from what I can see) pure Hereford behind him. From what I can see I'd take the redhead, very masculine.
 
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Does anyone know if you can use F1 bulls from registered angus and hereford parents to make registered black herefords? I know the dam can be an F1 but I wasn't sure about the sire.
 

Caustic Burno

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Black herfs have made their way up to Alberta. I've read countless comments making fun of them but I thought I'd give this guy a try because calves like him sell well in my area. He was born last May and was developed on green feed and alfalfa. Give me your honest opinions.


Why would you give away the hybrid vigor. That cross/composite brings nothings to the table but black hide. If you’re going to run Angus genetics get out of the septic tank of black hide and run the real thing. Lots of data out there from the Ag universities on the terminal calf, after the three way cross you actually start giving up weaning weights. Not all three crosses are equal either on hybrid vigor.
Again lots of data on the subject. Dr David Riley currently at TAMU also worked with MSU and UofFla has tons of research on the subject.
Pretty does not mash the scales or pay the feed bill.
I love a terminal Angus/ Hereford cross calf. Raised registered Hereford for decades.
Now if your wanting to put English genetics with some Brahman composites you would get some meat wagons.
 
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Why would you give away the hybrid vigor. That cross/composite brings nothings to the table but black hide. If you’re going to run Angus genetics get out of the septic tank of black hide and run the real thing. Lots of data out there from the Ag universities on the terminal calf, after the three way cross you actually start giving up weaning weights. Not all three crosses are equal either on hybrid vigor.
Again lots of data on the subject. Dr David Riley currently at TAMU also worked with MSU and UofFla has tons of research on the subject.
Pretty does not mash the scales or pay the feed bill.
I love a terminal Angus/ Hereford cross calf. Raised registered Hereford for decades.
Now if your wanting to put English genetics with some Brahman composites you would get some meat wagons.
How would they do in northern Alberta? We had a 10 day stretch of - 40 to -50C with the wind chill. Had to thaw the waterers a few times a day.
 

gcreekrch

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If my herd is all angus hereford crossed cows of different percentages than is there much difference in uniformity in using a black hereford rather than a pure angus or hereford?
Yes. We used 50/50 sim angus bulls on the same cows for several years. While consistency in type was good, colours were everywhere.
 

Warren Allison

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I mean the Brahman composites.
Two of the most valuable resources I have found on this forumn, is this pdf file @Caustic Burno has posted, and this youtube video on heteratosis that several have posted. Look at this video starting at about the 7 minute mark. The best cross with the most genetic diversity, is Hereford and Angus, especially Line 1 Herefords, This cross gives you the highest level of hybrid vigor. Both of these breeds will do well in Canada. IF you wanted to raise replacements, then as you can see in Caustic's pdf, Brahma bulls on these cows will be the best cross for the most hybrid vigor. A herd of Brahma cows might not do well in Canadian winters, but you could keep a Brahma bull warm pretty easily. The F1 calves would do as good as their baldy mothers in the winter as well.
 

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MichaelMcPherson299

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Stop with breeding percentage bulls to your cows. The ONLY way for consistency in your calf crop is to breed purebred bulls to your cow herd. Most small cow/calf operations own commercial cows bred from who knows where. Consistency puts more money in your pocket than color. If your not doing it, get some help dehorning, ear tagging, castrating and vaccinating. Two months before you sell your calf crop (bob 2 to 3 inches off the bottom of their tails). Stop keeping your heifers unless they are true F1's (both parents being purebreds). When its time to take your calf crop to town -- sell all your calves as no tags, have the sale barn sort them together as to the same size, steers vs heifers, color. {Sell Consistency}
 
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