• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

help vicky vet

A

Anonymous

Guest
Vicky I have a ? that I hope you can help me with. We have a steer that will bloat everytime he eats no matter what or how much he eats. He will bloat but will not go down or will he act like he is not feeling good he will be just as playful with us as when he is not bloated. The question is he will bloat but in a matter of hours like over maybe 6 hrs he will be fine. Without really knowing more what do you think is wrong and what can we do? Give him baking soda, probia, mineral oil and just about everything I have been told to do. Any help will be of great help. Thanks.

[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Ok, the first thing I have to ask is did he grain overload before the first time? There's a nerve which runs to the rumen called the vagus nerve. In some cases of grain overload, this nerve seems to get damaged and react this way. IF this didn't happen, consider hardware disease, liver abscess/parasitism etc. because it sounds like something is bugging that nerve. What I've done (twice in the last two months, for example) is either put in a permanent trochar OR do a surgery called a rumen fistula to prevent the recurrent bloat. Some animals grow out of it, some don't. If this doesn't make sense, give me more information and I'll try to clarify for you. V
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
>

What do you mean grain overload?

Ok, the first thing I have to ask
> is did he grain overload before
> the first time? There's a nerve
> which runs to the rumen called the
> vagus nerve. In some cases of
> grain overload, this nerve seems
> to get damaged and react this way.
> IF this didn't happen, consider
> hardware disease, liver
> abscess/parasitism etc. because it
> sounds like something is bugging
> that nerve. What I've done (twice
> in the last two months, for
> example) is either put in a
> permanent trochar OR do a surgery
> called a rumen fistula to prevent
> the recurrent bloat. Some animals
> grow out of it, some don't. If
> this doesn't make sense, give me
> more information and I'll try to
> clarify for you. V

[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Grain overload is where the animal gets too much grain and burns the lining of it's stomach. It can cause bloat (thus treating bloat with baking soda can work), can kill the animal if they go down, but subclinical can cause repeated burns and damage nerves. This would be if an animal was introduced to too much grain and kept at the too high level. Clear as mud?
 

Latest posts

Top