Heifer's first calf

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Anonymous

I am concerned about Mastitis. She is a 2yr old heifer and this is her first calf (2/23), her bag looked to be inflamed. We live in Minnesota, lots of snow this year and very cold. We don't have a Vet in our area, so we have to rely on word of mouth, which has been very helpful since we are new at raising beef cattle. Anyway, her calf does not seen to be nursing, gave the calf colostrum. (we could just be missing her nursing) had her first stool this morning (yellow and sticky) hope this is a good sign. How do I check for Mastitis? Do the nipples sometimes plug up? help, I'm sure some of these questions sound stupid, but any input would be greatly appreciated. Jackie
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OP
A

Anonymous

Is the calf alert? Are her eyes bright? Is she urinating and stooling regularly? These are good signs. Is the calf humped up, eyes dull, skin sticks together when you pinch it? These are bad signs. <p>Check the mother's udder. Is the hair around the nipples wet or swirled? This could give you a clue that the baby's nursing. <p>I have seen some redness on the udder of some of our cows when the udder is very engorged. The engorgement can be caused by the calf not nursing or by a larger than usual supply of milk. The redness can be from a full udder or it could be an actual case of mastitis. Is the udder hot where the redness is?<p>Can you put the cow in a head catch or chute and milk her out? I would milk her about halfway out and freeze the milk. Removing some of the pressure in her udder will make it easier for the calf to nurse if her udder/nipples are sore. You may have to do this more than once. <p>Most importantly, spend time observing the pair. If the calf is not nursing, do not wait. Tube or bottle feed the calf to keep it hydrated and to keep its strength up so it can nurse when it's ready.
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<ul><li><a href="http://www.murraygrey.com">Rafter L Murray Greys</a></ul>
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OP
A

Anonymous

> Is the calf alert? Are her eyes
> bright? Is she urinating and
> stooling regularly? These are
> good signs. Is the calf humped
> up, eyes dull, skin sticks
> together when you pinch it? These
> are bad signs. Check the
> mother's udder. Is the hair
> around the nipples wet or swirled?
> This could give you a clue that
> the baby's nursing. I have seen
> some redness on the udder of some
> of our cows when the udder is very
> engorged. The engorgement can be
> caused by the calf not nursing or
> by a larger than usual supply of
> milk. The redness can be from a
> full udder or it could be an
> actual case of mastitis. Is the
> udder hot where the redness is?
> Can you put the cow in a head
> catch or chute and milk her out?
> I would milk her about halfway out
> and freeze the milk. Removing
> some of the pressure in her udder
> will make it easier for the calf
> to nurse if her udder/nipples are
> sore. You may have to do this
> more than once. Most
> importantly, spend time observing
> the pair. If the calf is not
> nursing, do not wait. Tube or
> bottle feed the calf to keep it
> hydrated and to keep its strength
> up so it can nurse when it's
> ready. Rafter L Murray Greys

Try using some milking needles...wet them before inserting them...drain tits until empty and saggy..might have to do this a couple of times, they might be plugged up
 

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