Heifer accidently got bred by her sire.

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quartermeter

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What should I do? She was 18 mo old and weighs about 900 lbs when I saw him breed her. I'm going to wait and get her vet checked. My cows are commercial black angus but my bull is registered.. if she's bred what should I do.. I kept her because I was going to AI Her.. Bulls calves have all been 60-70 lbs... I'm all ears. Thanks
 

TCRanch

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If you're worried about a 2 headed calf or some other genetic abnormality, don't. It happens. We breed at 15 months. Unless she's incredibly small framed or just doesn't have the pelvic capacity she should be fine calving.
 

dun

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If you are really worried about it give her shot of dex and a shot of lute. She will slip the (possible) pregancy
 

Son of Butch

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quartermeter":2v3mkvny said:
What should I do? She was 18 mo old and weighs about 900 lbs when I saw him breed her. I'm going to wait and get her vet checked. My cows are commercial black angus but my bull is registered.. if she's bred what should I do..
A) IF she's pg calve her out... (not as big a deal as you think)
B) Sell her as a bred heifer if it bothers you that much.
C) I see no sense in aborting an 18 m old commercial heifer and then hoping you can get her pg again
 

farmerjan

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Lut and then AI; or let her have the calf. She ought to be plenty big enough and then AI her next year. You will also know if she is going to be a good mom and make enough milk to raise a nice calf. Being bred to her sire is not the end of the world.
 

True Grit Farms

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Breeding heifers to their sire isn't ideal, even folks that line breed don't go that far. It's poor management at best. IMO
With that being said I've had it happen myself. In the cattle business the two most important things are, do what's right, and stick with your game plan.
 

artesianspringsfarm

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True Grit Farms":16yyqn31 said:
Breeding heifers to their sire isn't ideal, even folks that line breed don't go that far. It's poor management at best. IMO
With that being said I've had it happen myself. In the cattle business the two most important things are, do what's right, and stick with your game plan.


Vince,

I disagree with you on this a little bit. I agree that sire/daughter breedings are not the norm even for linebreeders, but I do think they are a sound practice when you plan to linebreed and want to prove a sire is free from defects that may happen when you breed tightly. To that end, I will have 3 calves on the ground from a bull that I plan to weave back and forth through my pedigress for the next decade. They are all commercial heifers that he has sired. I won't retain the calves but I am curious to see how they grow. The first one hit the ground today at 65 lbs. He was up and nursing within minutes.

All that to say, if you are that worried about deformed calves, I think you should be worried about using that bull in the first place. If there's something hiding in the genetic woodpile, better to expose it and deal with it.
 

True Grit Farms

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artesianspringsfarm":1a8mybvh said:
True Grit Farms":1a8mybvh said:
Breeding heifers to their sire isn't ideal, even folks that line breed don't go that far. It's poor management at best. IMO
With that being said I've had it happen myself. In the cattle business the two most important things are, do what's right, and stick with your game plan.


Vince,

I disagree with you on this a little bit. I agree that sire/daughter breedings are not the norm even for linebreeders, but I do think they are a sound practice when you plan to linebreed and want to prove a sire is free from defects that may happen when you breed tightly. To that end, I will have 3 calves on the ground from a bull that I plan to weave back and forth through my pedigress for the next decade. They are all commercial heifers that he has sired. I won't retain the calves but I am curious to see how they grow. The first one hit the ground today at 65 lbs. He was up and nursing within minutes.

All that to say, if you are that worried about deformed calves, I think you should be worried about using that bull in the first place. If there's something hiding in the genetic woodpile, better to expose it and deal with it.

Probably my best looking cow is a sire/daughter breeding. Her first calf was a dink heifer and I was thinking here we go. But her second calf was a steer that gained almost 3lbs a day, and we never get over 2.5lb adg here. I'm looking forward to her next calf hopefully it'll be a heifer.
I sure wouldn't worry about a deformed calf because of the breeding.
 

Nesikep

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Inbreeding/linebreeding only REVEALS defects (recessive ones).. If the sire is a known carrier of a genetic defect (curly calf, or any of the others) then it would be risky.. the heifer would have a 50% chance of being a carrier.. IF she is, the calf would have a 25% chance of being affected.. If she isn't, it's a 0% chance.
I would look up the bulls pedigree and see.

My best growing and best looking heifer this year is from a 3/4 sibling mating.. meaty, wide, and heavy (pic at 20 days old)
 

dun

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Close to the same but a little different. We frequently breed mother to son. Never had an odd calf from it and have had some darn good cows result from it.
 

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