heat detection

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smallrancher

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I'm thinking of switching from Kamars to those detectors that are like a scratch off lottery ticket. Actually, I've already bought them, they are cheaper, and I've heard some good things about them. Anyone here used them/have any thoughts?
Thanks
 

wildcat

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I've used both, and I like the scratch off patches better. The best part is not having to me mess with that glue. They do stay on real good, and I think you have fewer false positives.
 

novaman

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I believe you are talking about the Estrotect. I used them last year and overall was very pleased with how they worked. I did have a few problems with the patches coming off when a cow was having a strong heat and being ridden heavily. Being color blind, a few of the colors are hard for me to distinguish, even against black and white cows :D . Nice thing is there are several colors to choose from so finding something that works for you shouldn't be an issue.
 

hillsdown

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novaman said:
I did have a few problems with the patches coming off when a cow was having a strong heat and being ridden heavily. quote]

Well the good thing about that is they usually have huge patches of hair missing on their back end and it is almost impossible to not know that they were in heat.. ;-)
 

novaman

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hillsdown":23cr01cr said:
novaman":23cr01cr said:
I did have a few problems with the patches coming off when a cow was having a strong heat and being ridden heavily. quote]

Well the good thing about that is they usually have huge patches of hair missing on their back end and it is almost impossible to not know that they were in heat.. ;-)
Exactly. Just thought I would mention it. The problems come with cows that don't show a strong heat. Sometimes they are scratched down the center but the sides aren't rubbed off. Takes some observation and a bit of judgement from time to time. A majority of the time the entire patch is either rubbed off to the color or is completely gone. I've found that if either of those scenarios takes place the cow should be ready to be AIed.

The aids are nice and can help to reinforce a hunch. However, if you yourself are lacking proper heat detection skills or time, aids will not bail you out.
 

CWT Angus

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Hi All- Just a tip on those patches. When you apply them use a spray glue to attach them securely. I use one made by Elmers & it is very inexpensive. Very, very rarely do I loose one that is glued. They really have to get hooked on a branch.

As far as heat detecting with them. They do take some practice to read, but are very effective if you know your cows & spend sufficient time watching for heat.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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I love the scratch tags. More reliable than K-Mars - but, I do have trouble keeping them on. I have resorted to using K-Mar glue on them.
But, remember - they are a TOOL - only use as a secondary sign.
Also - DON'T put any dewormer or delice POUR-ON on your cattle - makes them SLIDE right off!!! :banana: that was a costly lesson! Thought I could put the tag on the hip & just put the pour-on over the mid-back & shoulders - wrong - it "grows" and spreads all over (like it's supposed to do!)
 

wade

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I don't recommend this way of doing things but think it will work great this breeding season. When I banded calves last spring I had 2 that I did not get both nuts below the band. I later had the vet out and cut them at around 9 months old. These two are heat detecting fools. They are almost a pain in the butt to have around the cows. Got a question though, any chance of them having any viable sperm in them after cut?
 

dun

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wade":3g48a9sk said:
I don't recommend this way of doing things but think it will work great this breeding season. When I banded calves last spring I had 2 that I did not get both nuts below the band. I later had the vet out and cut them at around 9 months old. These two are heat detecting fools. They are almost a pain in the butt to have around the cows. Got a question though, any chance of them having any viable sperm in them after cut?

After cutiing or banding at an older age they theoretically can still have a few live ones. Even a retained nut can still have enough viable sperm to get a cow pregnant.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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A cheap way to get a "gomer bull" is to take a cull cow & shoot her up with testosterone. She will be a great heat detector - and absolutely no chance of a "screw up". Just a pain having to keep giving her shots. We did this at a farm we managed. Worked really good.
Now, I just figure out what bull calves have a real high libido. I always check and see who they are sleeping next to or grazing next to - let alone the actual jumping activity. There always seems to be a few bull calves that are super horny & are great heat detectors. Kinda hard on their growth for 60 days.
 

dun

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":2nwbuosq said:
A cheap way to get a "gomer bull" is to take a cull cow & shoot her up with testosterone. She will be a great heat detector - and absolutely no chance of a "screw up". Just a pain having to keep giving her shots. We did this at a farm we managed. Worked really good.
Now, I just figure out what bull calves have a real high libido. I always check and see who they are sleeping next to or grazing next to - let alone the actual jumping activity. There always seems to be a few bull calves that are super horny & are great heat detectors. Kinda hard on their growth for 60 days.

We keep the horniest steerr calf ech year as a gomer. Works great but the second year they're pretty much duds.
 

Northern Rancher

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I've used just about every form of Gomer known to man and like the estrotect patches alot better. In a big bunch of cows you spend more time filling chinballs with a Gomer than I like. I breed cattle in synch programs all summer but we still do the traditional saddle horse and pull at home-good work for young horses and a relaxing way to wind down A'I season.
 

dun

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Northern Rancher":2qrkp8c1 said:
I've used just about every form of Gomer known to man and like the estrotect patches alot better. In a big bunch of cows you spend more time filling chinballs with a Gomer than I like. I breed cattle in synch programs all summer but we still do the traditional saddle horse and pull at home-good work for young horses and a relaxing way to wind down A'I season.

We don;t use markers, just horny steers tending and riding.
 

Hutch

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I have found that heating them up( glue gets real sticky) helps them stay on much better.
 

Alan

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Good subject, but a few questions. I used K Mars last year but also have the scratch offs... I quickly started to hate the glue. May try the scratch offs with the spray on glue this year.

Now for my questions, someone mentioned not using pour on wormer while applying the heat detecting patch. I'm under the impression you wouldn't want to worm close to breeding because of the wormer attacking the fetus as it would a parisite. Is this correct or not?

Second if I used testosterone on one cull cow, how often do I need to boost the shot?

Thanks,
Alan
 

GRTiger85

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Yup, Heating them up is the key...Just use a heat pad or something, I use one with an adaptor out of my truck, put them under the pad and turn it up on high for awhile, and you wont be able to get them off. I just let them wear off and I have cows out in the pasture that still have patches on em and they have been on since mid January when I was doing my AI.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Alan - Most dewormers are perfectly safe at all stages of gestation. I do know that Valbezen is not supposed to be used during a time period - like the first 45 days of gestation?? Too lazy to go down cellar to find product & read label - but there is a time period you can't use it. You would have to read the label of the product you use. I know a Safeguard rep that used to recommend drenching the cows as you put them thru the chute for breeding. Perfectly safe on them.
Other producers may know of other products that aren't safe, but Valbezen is the only one that I know of that does have a warning.
Edit - also, on the testosterone - there is a specific dosage & time schedule. Did it many, many years ago - you would have to check with a vet. Seems like we had to inject daily for about a week, than hit her maybe once a week. But, I really don't remember - just remember it was a long drawn out affair - but worked GREAT.
 

bigag03

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Whether the label says it is safe or not, I don't like doing anything "extra" when you are trying to get cows bred. Conception rate is driving force behind profit and loss and I don't want cows doing anything besides getting bred during that time. Any pre-breeding working or vacs are given 30 days prior to breeding and I don't want to do anything else for at least 30 days post breeding and would prefer to leave them alone for 60 days post breeding. Just my 2 cents!
 

TexasBred

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dun":2pp6x69n said:
Northern Rancher":2pp6x69n said:
I've used just about every form of Gomer known to man and like the estrotect patches alot better. In a big bunch of cows you spend more time filling chinballs with a Gomer than I like. I breed cattle in synch programs all summer but we still do the traditional saddle horse and pull at home-good work for young horses and a relaxing way to wind down A'I season.

We don;t use markers, just horny steers tending and riding.

Same here...patches don't tell me when they quit standing or much of anything else except that the patch was activated somehow.
 

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