Haygrazer without seed tops?

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BK9954

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Have haygrazer hay cut without seed pods on top. Think it is still good hay protien wise? All the other I have bought always had the seed on top when cut.
 
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BK9954

BK9954

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Great, It was 2nd cutting, no weeds, $30 a bale delivered, 4X5.5. Guy said it was about 13% protein. He is a pretty honest man. Has a good reputation.
 

Texasmark

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Cutting before the boot stage is where the best combination of retained protein, tenderness in the stalk especially, and volume, so say the people in the know. Cutting after heading out puts the protein in the head, and the stem starts to turning to flax and decreases in digestibility. Folks that hay for a living sometimes have too much to get to on time and wind up with some of their fields heading/headed out. Others may have an ulterior motive for doing so.

I have a few pictures of a super quality Sorghum-Sudan Cross called Gotcha Plus from a supplier in Denton, TX. It is brown stem,late maturing, small stems and this years price for me was $22 per 50 # bag and I plant a bag an acre to help with the small stems.

The baler is a JD 375 that rolls a reduced size 5' wide bale of 4' diameter rather than the normal 6' diameter, thus reducing the weight to around 800# (all things considered). On whether you prefer this type roll or a 5x6 cut off at 4' and rolled to 5.5' is up to you. My rolls are easier to see around with a smaller tractor when on your FEL. The other type mentioned, like yours, stack side by side and meet the OTR width restrictions for guys that truck them down the road so you don't get hassled about having a wide load, unlike putting 5x6 rolls side by side like in the old days and with some balers today too.






 
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BK9954

BK9954

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Texasmark":3hi18y25 said:
Cutting before the boot stage is where the best combination of retained protein, tenderness in the stalk especially, and volume, so say the people in the know. Cutting after heading out puts the protein in the head, and the stem starts to turning to flax and decreases in digestibility. Folks that hay for a living sometimes have too much to get to on time and wind up with some of their fields heading/headed out. Others may have an ulterior motive for doing so.

I have a few pictures of a super quality Sorghum-Sudan Cross called Gotcha Plus from a supplier in Denton, TX. It is brown stem,late maturing, small stems and this years price for me was $22 per 50 # bag and I plant a bag an acre to help with the small stems.

The baler is a JD 375 that rolls a reduced size 5' wide bale of 4' diameter rather than the normal 6' diameter, thus reducing the weight to around 800# (all things considered). On whether you prefer this type roll or a 5x6 cut off at 4' and rolled to 5.5' is up to you. My rolls are easier to see around with a smaller tractor when on your FEL. The other type mentioned, like yours, stack side by side and meet the OTR width restrictions for guys that truck them down the road so you don't get hassled about having a wide load, unlike putting 5x6 rolls side by side like in the old days and with some balers today too.






The stems on this batch were pretty thin. I will put a pic when I get a day off. The cows are doing decent on it. Maintaining but not gaining.
 

TexasBred

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BK9954":3r7kw2sj said:
Have haygrazer hay cut without seed pods on top. Think it is still good hay protien wise? All the other I have bought always had the seed on top when cut.
BK why are you having to buy hay?? Figured you'd have grass knee deep by now with all the good rains we've had.
 

callmefence

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Texasmark":2pw8lu9t said:
Cutting before the boot stage is where the best combination of retained protein, tenderness in the stalk especially, and volume, so say the people in the know. Cutting after heading out puts the protein in the head, and the stem starts to turning to flax and decreases in digestibility. Folks that hay for a living sometimes have too much to get to on time and wind up with some of their fields heading/headed out. Others may have an ulterior motive for doing so.

I have a few pictures of a super quality Sorghum-Sudan Cross called Gotcha Plus from a supplier in Denton, TX. It is brown stem,late maturing, small stems and this years price for me was $22 per 50 # bag and I plant a bag an acre to help with the small stems.

The baler is a JD 375 that rolls a reduced size 5' wide bale of 4' diameter rather than the normal 6' diameter, thus reducing the weight to around 800# (all things considered). On whether you prefer this type roll or a 5x6 cut off at 4' and rolled to 5.5' is up to you. My rolls are easier to see around with a smaller tractor when on your FEL. The other type mentioned, like yours, stack side by side and meet the OTR width restrictions for guys that truck them down the road so you don't get hassled about having a wide load, unlike putting 5x6 rolls side by side like in the old days and with some balers today too.







I can't ever remember how it goes...early = more protein..later = more sugar...something like that. I agree most gets cut late due to time constraints, but some I think to increase the yield , to he'll with quality.

Planted this very early, around end of February :shock: sometimes you get lucky. Probably be grazing it in a few weeks.




Last year. I'm using Tridan a three way by brownie. It recovers quicker and better than any of the others I've tried(maybe a half dozen)

 
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BK9954

BK9954

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TexasBred":3gjoibtu said:
BK9954":3gjoibtu said:
Have haygrazer hay cut without seed pods on top. Think it is still good hay protien wise? All the other I have bought always had the seed on top when cut.
BK why are you having to buy hay?? Figured you'd have grass knee deep by now with all the good rains we've had.
3 reasons, never know how wet the summer will be, my cows will still snack on haygrazer in the spring and it keeps them from bloating(cheaper then bloat blocks), and right now I still have my last 4 replacement heifer locked up in a 1 acre pasture with a heifer bull. My grass is so tall they cant keep up with it. Everything is green but I like to keep stocked on hay just in case, especially while it is cheap.
 

Bigfoot

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I'm planting sudex today. Wish I had the stuff the new guy is talking about. Stems are an issue. I can't cut it when it needs it.
 

TexasBred

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callmefence":128hz4az said:
I can't ever remember how it goes...early = more protein..later = more sugar...something like that. I agree most gets cut late due to time constraints, but some I think to increase the yield , to he'll with quality.

Nailed it.....some could care less about quality. All they want is lots of it.
 

RanchMan90

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callmefence":3pum4hsi said:
Texasmark":3pum4hsi said:
Cutting before the boot stage is where the best combination of retained protein, tenderness in the stalk especially, and volume, so say the people in the know. Cutting after heading out puts the protein in the head, and the stem starts to turning to flax and decreases in digestibility. Folks that hay for a living sometimes have too much to get to on time and wind up with some of their fields heading/headed out. Others may have an ulterior motive for doing so.

I have a few pictures of a super quality Sorghum-Sudan Cross called Gotcha Plus from a supplier in Denton, TX. It is brown stem,late maturing, small stems and this years price for me was $22 per 50 # bag and I plant a bag an acre to help with the small stems.

The baler is a JD 375 that rolls a reduced size 5' wide bale of 4' diameter rather than the normal 6' diameter, thus reducing the weight to around 800# (all things considered). On whether you prefer this type roll or a 5x6 cut off at 4' and rolled to 5.5' is up to you. My rolls are easier to see around with a smaller tractor when on your FEL. The other type mentioned, like yours, stack side by side and meet the OTR width restrictions for guys that truck them down the road so you don't get hassled about having a wide load, unlike putting 5x6 rolls side by side like in the old days and with some balers today too.







I can't ever remember how it goes...early = more protein..later = more sugar...something like that. I agree most gets cut late due to time constraints, but some I think to increase the yield , to he'll with quality.

Planted this very early, around end of February :shock: sometimes you get lucky. Probably be grazing it in a few weeks.




Last year. I'm using Tridan a three way by brownie. It recovers quicker and better than any of the others I've tried(maybe a half dozen)

Looks good. What kind of stocking rate and duration do you get out of this?
 

Texasmark

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Using it for hay only. I don't think you'd realize the potential stocking it due to it's late maturing characteristics, thin stems sure.
 

callmefence

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RanchMan90":cf5mb6tk said:
callmefence":cf5mb6tk said:
Texasmark":cf5mb6tk said:
Cutting before the boot stage is where the best combination of retained protein, tenderness in the stalk especially, and volume, so say the people in the know. Cutting after heading out puts the protein in the head, and the stem starts to turning to flax and decreases in digestibility. Folks that hay for a living sometimes have too much to get to on time and wind up with some of their fields heading/headed out. Others may have an ulterior motive for doing so.

I have a few pictures of a super quality Sorghum-Sudan Cross called Gotcha Plus from a supplier in Denton, TX. It is brown stem,late maturing, small stems and this years price for me was $22 per 50 # bag and I plant a bag an acre to help with the small stems.

The baler is a JD 375 that rolls a reduced size 5' wide bale of 4' diameter rather than the normal 6' diameter, thus reducing the weight to around 800# (all things considered). On whether you prefer this type roll or a 5x6 cut off at 4' and rolled to 5.5' is up to you. My rolls are easier to see around with a smaller tractor when on your FEL. The other type mentioned, like yours, stack side by side and meet the OTR width restrictions for guys that truck them down the road so you don't get hassled about having a wide load, unlike putting 5x6 rolls side by side like in the old days and with some balers today too.







I can't ever remember how it goes...early = more protein..later = more sugar...something like that. I agree most gets cut late due to time constraints, but some I think to increase the yield , to he'll with quality.

Planted this very early, around end of February :shock: sometimes you get lucky. Probably be grazing it in a few weeks.




Last year. I'm using Tridan a three way by brownie. It recovers quicker and better than any of the others I've tried(maybe a half dozen)

Looks good. What kind of stocking rate and duration do you get out of this?

I don't like the term stocking rate. Just to many variables. I will tell you this it will kick the shyt outta pearl millet. I use it primarily to get pressures off my warm grasses in early summer and fall. You plant when the farmers are planting corn. Start grazing at about 30" tall
About 4 weeks :cboy: .graze it about half down pull em it'll bounce right back up in a couple weeks. Always pull em after a rain and try to graze to oblivion right before frost. Don't graze after frost.
We double crop on same ground as fall oats.
 

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