Hay Fed

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kenny thomas

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I am somewhat taken aback by how some of you have fed no, or very little hay and we are almost to December.

I could blame my management, but honestly, most folks around here start feeding hay weeks before me.
I can not see myself going back to feeding hay for 5 months of the year if I can manage differently and not feed. The cost of producing hay is much more than I spend in stockpiling.
It's not for everyone and in much of the US it wouldn't be possible but it sure is nice to be a lazy farmer and just ride out in the field and watch them eat grass.
 

chevytaHOE5674

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Is it normal for you to have snow all winter? It would be a big challenge to me if I had much snow at all. I don't see much profit here if I fed 3 months or more.
We always have snow all winter. Usually 3 to 4 feet on the ground all winter long. We average about 15 feet of snowfall a season. Feeding hay UP here is inevitable. My hope is always to make it to December 1st on grass and to be grazing by June 1st, 6 months of feeding I can handle. When you have to start feeding hay in October things get ugly.
 

chevytaHOE5674

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I used to as well, but I fenced more hay ground in and didn't increase my stocking rate. As long as the deep snow stays away, or if it gets deep as long as it stays fluffy I make them work for it.
 
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HDRider

HDRider

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I can not see myself going back to feeding hay for 5 months of the year if I can manage differently and not feed. The cost of producing hay is much more than I spend in stockpiling.
It's not for everyone and in much of the US it wouldn't be possible but it sure is nice to be a lazy farmer and just ride out in the field and watch them eat grass.
Kenny, does your fescue last through the summer?


Mine goes dormant July through September.
 

WFfarm

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We've been feeding hay for the last 3 weeks. This year has been one of the wettest I can remember. Haven't had 3 days without rain since July. Everywhere cows linger becomes a muddy mess.

It's in stark contrast to last year which was really dry and we had to started feeding hay in August. This year we put up about 20% more hay than last year too. We should have excess come spring. Not sure whether to buy more cows, sell some hay, or store it for the following year.
 

ClinchValley86

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I can not see myself going back to feeding hay for 5 months of the year if I can manage differently and not feed. The cost of producing hay is much more than I spend in stockpiling.
It's not for everyone and in much of the US it wouldn't be possible but it sure is nice to be a lazy farmer and just ride out in the field and watch them eat grass.
Pretty much how I feel about it. Takes a lot of money to make hay only to end up with more $$$ per bale than I can buy it for. That's our unfair advantage though.
 

Little Joe

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I am somewhat taken aback by how some of you have fed no, or very little hay and we are almost to December.

I could blame my management, but honestly, most folks around here start feeding hay weeks before me.
I put out my first bale this week, I generally try not to feed any before the week of Thanksgiving. I had fewer cattle this fall and the fescue seemed to do good as well as clover so I was able to make it about a week longer than usual. Some years it'll be the first of November when I have to put out my first hay.
 
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HDRider

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I put out my first bale this week, I generally try not to feed any before the week of Thanksgiving. I had fewer cattle this fall and the fescue seemed to do good as well as clover so I was able to make it about a week longer than usual. Some years it'll be the first of November when I have to put out my first hay.
Loving the weather right now. Starting to get dry, but man oh man, it has been nice.
 

Little Joe

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Loving the weather right now. Starting to get dry, but man oh man, it has been nice.
For sure, the weather has been nice but a little dry for this time of year. The longer fall has allowed for me to get some much needed projects done. Spring and fall I'm busier than a one legged man in a but kicking contest trying to get all my projects done before it gets hot or cold, usually neither season lasts long enough.
 

gcreekrch

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Was hoping we would get the cow herd to Dec 10 but some cold weather showed up on the 5th and some snow. Rather than have them browsing jack pine we started rolling out the late cut silage bales we made in Sept. They do have some grazing left. Will sort into feed bunches on Saturday. Rolling out 21 bales a day for now. Will be a couple more once we are sorted and herds moved closer to stacks.
 

wbvs58

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Was hoping we would get the cow herd to Dec 10 but some cold weather showed up on the 5th and some snow. Rather than have them browsing jack pine we started rolling out the late cut silage bales we made in Sept. They do have some grazing left. Will sort into feed bunches on Saturday. Rolling out 21 bales a day for now. Will be a couple more once we are sorted and herds moved closer to stacks.
A lot of work ahead Dave.

Ken
 

wbvs58

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I actually enjoy feeding and calving.
I was going to ask in the other thread if you do admire the beautifull scenery of the snow covered farm or are too busy to take it all in but I guess you have answered my question Dave.
I stand on my back step every morning at dawn when I take the kitchen rubbish out and just look at the scenery and sigh. Even in dry times the morning adds that bit of crispness to things.

Ken
 

gcreekrch

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I was going to ask in the other thread if you do admire the beautifull scenery of the snow covered farm or are too busy to take it all in but I guess you have answered my question Dave.
I stand on my back step every morning at dawn when I take the kitchen rubbish out and just look at the scenery and sigh. Even in dry times the morning adds that bit of crispness to things.

Ken
There is absolutely no place like home!
 

Muletrack

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Have not fed any hay yet. Will finish up on stockpiled OG this week, and then move on to oats and turnip mix. Cattle look really good.

No way to make money on cattle here feeding $140 to $250 / ton hay for six months.
Oats and turnip mix? Talk more about grazing that. I'm converting about 140 acres of soybean ground back to forages and am looking for an assortment of ideas. You think a fella might take a hay crop off something and then sow turnips and oats? I don't ever expect to be able to graze year-around in east-central North Dakota, but just through most of December would be great (with bale grazing after that).
 

Nick Wagner

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Oats and turnip mix? Talk more about grazing that. I'm converting about 140 acres of soybean ground back to forages and am looking for an assortment of ideas. You think a fella might take a hay crop off something and then sow turnips and oats? I don't ever expect to be able to graze year-around in east-central North Dakota, but just through most of December would be great (with bale grazing after that).
Oats and turnips melt when it turns cold. I tried it once, had a nice lush field that laid down at the first hard frost. What I didn’t expect was the cows digging those turnips up. Their faces were mud halfway to their eyes. And turnips produce potent gas, stay away from both ends of the cow.
 

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