Hay Fed

Help Support CattleToday:

SBMF 2015

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
1,776
Reaction score
1,505
Location
West Central,IL
I have fed a lot more than I planned, but I hadn't started feeding silage yet. Started last Wednesday. That's cut the amount of hay I feed by 2/3s a day.
 

Stocker Steve

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2005
Messages
11,483
Reaction score
784
Location
Central Minnesota
Have not fed any hay yet. Will finish up on stockpiled OG this week, and then move on to oats and turnip mix. Cattle look really good.

No way to make money on cattle here feeding $140 to $250 / ton hay for six months.
 
OP
HDRider

HDRider

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
7,490
Reaction score
1,648
Location
NE Arkansas
Have not fed any hay yet. Will finish up on stockpiled OG this week, and then move on to oats and turnip mix. Cattle look really good.

No way to make money on cattle here feeding $140 to $250 / ton hay for six months.
Do you feed something other than hay?

I assume the oats and turnip is on tillable ground?

It is more like $70 a ton here, but it is my biggest expense.

You are central Minnesota. How many head per acre (or acre per head) do you graze year round?

I would have to keep cattle off my ground for 3 months to stockpile enough grass to graze for three months. That is just a guess, but I cannot figure out a way to stockpile grass and still graze year around. I guess you could argue I am over stocked.
 

TennesseeTuxedo

CT Supporter
CT Supporter
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Messages
18,804
Reaction score
3,496
Location
Live in Franklin, TN farm in Warsaw, KY
Do you feed something other than hay?

I assume the oats and turnip is on tillable ground?

It is more like $70 a ton here, but it is my biggest expense.

You are central Minnesota. How many head per acre (or acre per head) do you graze year round?

I would have to keep cattle off my ground for 3 months to stockpile enough grass to graze for three months. That is just a guess, but I cannot figure out a way to stockpile grass and still graze year around. I guess you could argue I am over stocked.
Under-pastured.
 

Chevy

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 7, 2011
Messages
2,650
Reaction score
1,092
Hasn't got cold yet here. Leafs are just now falling off trees here. We haven't feed much hay.
 

Dave

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 12, 2004
Messages
10,708
Reaction score
2,991
Location
Baker County, Oregon
Most here haven't fed yet. Calves have been pulled and shipped. The cows kicked back to the hills. Everyone is trying to keep the cows out as long as possible with the price of hay being what it is. But they are also trying to move cows to the lower pastures where they will be easier to retrieve should the great white cowboy show up unexpectedly.
 

ClinchValley86

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 8, 2019
Messages
458
Reaction score
227
Location
East Tennessee
Do you feed something other than hay?

I assume the oats and turnip is on tillable ground?

It is more like $70 a ton here, but it is my biggest expense.

You are central Minnesota. How many head per acre (or acre per head) do you graze year round?

I would have to keep cattle off my ground for 3 months to stockpile enough grass to graze for three months. That is just a guess, but I cannot figure out a way to stockpile grass and still graze year around. I guess you could argue I am over stocked.
I feed hay in Fall while it stockpiles. The drought really set me back.
 
OP
HDRider

HDRider

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
7,490
Reaction score
1,648
Location
NE Arkansas
Most here haven't fed yet. Calves have been pulled and shipped. The cows kicked back to the hills. Everyone is trying to keep the cows out as long as possible with the price of hay being what it is. But they are also trying to move cows to the lower pastures where they will be easier to retrieve should the great white cowboy show up unexpectedly.
I completely understand it is a regional thing.

That said, I am intrigued by @Stocker Steve 's approach, and if I could make that work. I sure do not see how.

I posted this thread as either an indication of my grass getting better, or it is just dumb luck. Weather-wise, this year is very much like last year.
 

Stocker Steve

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2005
Messages
11,483
Reaction score
784
Location
Central Minnesota
Do you feed something other than hay?

I assume the oats and turnip is on tillable ground?

You are central Minnesota. How many head per acre (or acre per head) do you graze year round?

I would have to keep cattle off my ground for 3 months to stockpile enough grass to graze for three months. That is just a guess, but I cannot figure out a way to stockpile grass and still graze year around. I guess you could argue I am over stocked.
- Grass and some byproduct.
- Yes, a fall seeded double crop.
- Year round grazing is not economical in most parts of the US. It is a consultant selling point for uncommon conditions.
- We overstocked initially because hay was cheap, calves were high, and the ground we bought had been mined out. Peaked at a pair per acre but that was not sustainable.

Feeding hay for half the year is not economical either, unless hay is reasonable and calves are high priced. So an ideal stocking rate is based on running a couple gross margin calculations where you put in cattle prices and pasture cost and hay cost... and look at how the different stocking rates effect your return.

I think a profitable fescue belt grazing operation has 3 basic options:
1) a temporary seasonal herd plus the cow herd to graze in the spring, stockers or fall born calves?
2) unroll purchased hay in the fall while you stockpile grass for the winter, do u need imported fertility?
3) lease land really cheap and understock it most of the year, do u have free pasture?

Most producers have too many cows...
 
Last edited:

chevytaHOE5674

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2012
Messages
951
Reaction score
165
Location
Western UP, Mi
Haven't fed but a couple of bales to get cows moved around (they like to follow the tractor and bale this time of year). I am understocked so I make a bit of early hay and then stockpile it for fall/early winter. Some years (like this year) it works out as the snow is only a few inches deep and they can still graze. Few years back I had a bunch of stockpile get buried under 4 foot of snow overnight in early November and grazing came to an abrupt halt with tons of forage going to waste.
 

kenny thomas

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Messages
12,107
Reaction score
2,529
Location
SW tip of Virginia
Haven't fed but a couple of bales to get cows moved around (they like to follow the tractor and bale this time of year). I am understocked so I make a bit of early hay and then stockpile it for fall/early winter. Some years (like this year) it works out as the snow is only a few inches deep and they can still graze. Few years back I had a bunch of stockpile get buried under 4 foot of snow overnight in early November and grazing came to an abrupt halt with tons of forage going to waste.
Is it normal for you to have snow all winter? It would be a big challenge to me if I had much snow at all. I don't see much profit here if I fed 3 months or more.
 

BFE

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2017
Messages
1,027
Reaction score
858
Location
Southeast Illinois
This time last year cows had been off the summer place nearly a month. I still can't get some to cross the creek to come to hay and feed.
Guess that's a good thing, grass has been way better this year but I've got stalks and stockpile waiting for them, will wean when I get them moved, etc, winter is getting shorter by the day. I like to rest the ground, so I wish they'd all come over, the pickings are getting mighty slim.
 

jltrent

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 25, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
1,649
Location
Virginia
I have been feeding a couple 5x5 rounds a day to give dry forage to go a long with the frosty grass. I still have hay fields and pretty good pasture grass.
 

Latest posts

Top