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Hay by the ton?????

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TexasBred

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Farmers and ranchers often tell me their prairie hay or cane hay or other grass hay looks really good but when a lab tested it the relative feed value, also called RFV, was surprisingly low. Protein was good, TDN was okay, and the animals did just fine. So what’s wrong with relative feed value?
Actually nothing is wrong. We must understand how RFV is calculated and how it should be used. First, relative feed value is calculated using only fiber values. Even though protein certainly affects the value of hay, it has absolutely no affect on the calculation of relative feed value.
Relative feed value was initially developed for the dairy industry. It was designed to help rank the potential energy intake of different hays by lactating dairy cows. RFV does this quite well, especially for legumes like alfalfa.
Grass hay, though, is a bit more difficult. Grass has more fiber than alfalfa, which lowers its RFV. But, that fiber often is more digestible than alfalfa fiber. So grass hay frequently is ranked lower than it should be using relative feed value.
Also, RFV doesn’t predict performance by other types of animals, like beef cows, as well because potential energy intake does not have as much influence on their performance.
What this basically means is that when you feed grass hay to animals other than dairy cows, focus on crude protein and TDN.
The RFV is much less important and could cause you to worry more than its worth.
 

user1

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There is one reliable person to get your hay from, yourself. Otherwise it’s a yearly battle
 

TexasBred

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user1":36qssrcb said:
There is one reliable person to get your hay from, yourself. Otherwise it’s a yearly battle
I think my hay supplier is probably more reliable than I would be.
 

Banjo

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Back in '07 and '08 I got some hay out of SE Arkansas....Bahia 5x5's for 20 a roll. Cows ate it fine, didn't have it tested. The trucker that hauled it said where he loaded it......there were hay rolls as far as you could see.
The trucking cost more per bale than the hay, but your a lot closer to Arkansas than me.
 
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Bigfoot

Bigfoot

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Banjo":2zcggipj said:
Back in '07 and '08 I got some hay out of SE Arkansas....Bahia 5x5's for 20 a roll. Cows ate it fine, didn't have it tested. The trucker that hauled it said where he loaded it......there were hay rolls as far as you could see.
The trucking cost more per bale than the hay, but your a lot closer to Arkansas than me.

PM me, if you still have any contact info. The only trucker I know, won't haul through the only area, that I have found hay. It is some bad driving though.
 

Stocker Steve

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TexasBred":259xqaqw said:
Farmers and ranchers often tell me their prairie hay or cane hay or other grass hay looks really good but when a lab tested it the relative feed value, also called RFV, was surprisingly low. Protein was good, TDN was okay, and the animals did just fine. So what’s wrong with relative feed value?
Actually nothing is wrong. We must understand how RFV is calculated and how it should be used. First, relative feed value is calculated using only fiber values. Even though protein certainly affects the value of hay, it has absolutely no affect on the calculation of relative feed value.
Relative feed value was initially developed for the dairy industry. It was designed to help rank the potential energy intake of different hays by lactating dairy cows. RFV does this quite well, especially for legumes like alfalfa.
Grass hay, though, is a bit more difficult. Grass has more fiber than alfalfa, which lowers its RFV. But, that fiber often is more digestible than alfalfa fiber. So grass hay frequently is ranked lower than it should be using relative feed value.
Also, RFV doesn’t predict performance by other types of animals, like beef cows, as well because potential energy intake does not have as much influence on their performance.
What this basically means is that when you feed grass hay to animals other than dairy cows, focus on crude protein and TDN.
The RFV is much less important and could cause you to worry more than its worth.

So you would value and select dry cow hay by price per percent TDN?
Would you do the same for yearlings, if it met a minimum CP level?
 

Texasmark

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M-5":3vwwrlno said:
its relative to the area your buying from and the current drought conditions. I have seen it 120 a ton to 165 a ton. Here its bought and sold by the roll still. but I have started doing more research because I will sell some hay this year because of the need for quality in the market place , hay traders are in every area of the country . TB and a few other will tell you that you need to test what your buying , That is hard to do when buying out of state. then you factor in freight which is at a premium right now with the passage of ELD , I have manufactures I've been buying from for years and the freight shipments are 30days out . I have had to start arranging my own shipments of shingles and the trucks are running around 1200 $ a load for a 5 hr haul .

What is ELD, please?
 

M-5

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Texasmark":1q2rbpmw said:
M-5":1q2rbpmw said:
its relative to the area your buying from and the current drought conditions. I have seen it 120 a ton to 165 a ton. Here its bought and sold by the roll still. but I have started doing more research because I will sell some hay this year because of the need for quality in the market place , hay traders are in every area of the country . TB and a few other will tell you that you need to test what your buying , That is hard to do when buying out of state. then you factor in freight which is at a premium right now with the passage of ELD , I have manufactures I've been buying from for years and the freight shipments are 30days out . I have had to start arranging my own shipments of shingles and the trucks are running around 1200 $ a load for a 5 hr haul .

What is ELD, please?
Electronic logging device. It is crippleing the trucking industry. Just another over reaching government mandate.
 

Texasmark

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M-5":2ucgoqv3 said:
Texasmark":2ucgoqv3 said:
M-5":2ucgoqv3 said:
its relative to the area your buying from and the current drought conditions. I have seen it 120 a ton to 165 a ton. Here its bought and sold by the roll still. but I have started doing more research because I will sell some hay this year because of the need for quality in the market place , hay traders are in every area of the country . TB and a few other will tell you that you need to test what your buying , That is hard to do when buying out of state. then you factor in freight which is at a premium right now with the passage of ELD , I have manufactures I've been buying from for years and the freight shipments are 30days out . I have had to start arranging my own shipments of shingles and the trucks are running around 1200 $ a load for a 5 hr haul .

What is ELD, please?
Electronic logging device. It is crippleing the trucking industry. Just another over reaching government mandate.

I don't understand. I assume it allows companies to know where their trucks are at all times. I can see this as a sure-fire benefit for them, their customers (with their mandated delivery windows) and the truckers who might get into harm's way and nobody would know about it but for the fact that the truck isn't moving somewhere out in BFE.

I can see the fed nose being that hours are mandated and ensuring that drivers "obey the law"....since we "deplorables" live by "the Rule of Law".....prettymuch.
 

M-5

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GPS and electronic weigh devices and cameras have been in use for years. It's very beneficial but it's a companies decision to implement the program . The feds have gotten involved even more now . Trucking is in short supply which has driven prices well beyond what they should be . It all gets passed along to the consumer so if theybdon't mind paying it I guess it's ok. Every single item sold is handled by trucks at one point so everything is effected.
 
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