Have land, need education....

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Anonymous

I have come into two small tracts of land via real estate investments. I am interested in making the land productive for my own benefit. I really don't have much farming experience but I have been doing some reading of late and I find it very interesting. My wife and I both have full time steady income so we would not be relying on the farm income to sustain ourselves. We are looking for additional income sources. Both of these properties are in Alabama.

One tract is 21 acres, approx 50% timber and 50% pasture. It is already fenced with barbed wire and there is an existing catch pen. There is also spring water on the property. I intend to sell the majority of the timber to generate cash. There is also a 3bd/1ba house on the property that i plan on renting out.

The next tract is only 3 acres. It is all cleared land, already fenced with barbed wire, has a small creek and a 3bd/2ba house on it that I intend to rent out.

I would appreciate any suggestions you may have to help make a decision.

Thanks for your input, Robert

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Anonymous

The 3 acre parcel isn't even worth trying to run cattle on, the 21 acre parcel might handle 7-10 head. If you aren't cattle savy now, and the place will be sold in the next few years, don't bother. If this will be a retirement place for you, buy a couple bred/ or calved out cows from a local purebred breeder who will help you out with breeding them back and selling the calves.

Other than that, rent the grass to another local producer.

Jason Trowbridge Southern Angus Farms Alberta Canada

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Anonymous

Personally, I would clear the land well. That 21 acres won't be worth much to a rancher. Your best bet would be to clear it and sell to someone with a few horses. If the pasture is good, then leave it. If not, you could fertilize and seed. 21 acres isn't enough to run cattle on and would just be a loss of money. It would make a nice homestead with space for horses. Good luck.

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Anonymous

You could run a few head of cattle on the 21 acres. Im not sure what you consider pasture up in Alabama, but if you plant the other half in some type of pasture grasses you could sustain a few head of cattle. You would have to have supplemental feeding like hay and depending on how good you want the cows to look maybe feed em some range cubes everynow and then. Buy you a young Bull or two and stick em on the 3 acres waterem feedem and sell them as Breeding aged bulls.

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Anonymous

As I said before, you could run a few head, but you would lose money. Bulls would be your best bet, but that's a little more care and handling (and money). I have no clue what your market is like there, so you might ask around to see what breed is selling the highest.

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Anonymous

>i have 20 acres and with 3 momma cows raised 31 300 lb calves last year. there are ways to use any amount of land for ag purpose I have come into two small tracts
> of land via real estate
> investments. I am interested in
> making the land productive for my
> own benefit. I really don't have
> much farming experience but I have
> been doing some reading of late
> and I find it very interesting. My
> wife and I both have full time
> steady income so we would not be
> relying on the farm income to
> sustain ourselves. We are looking
> for additional income sources.
> Both of these properties are in
> Alabama.

> One tract is 21 acres, approx 50%
> timber and 50% pasture. It is
> already fenced with barbed wire
> and there is an existing catch
> pen. There is also spring water on
> the property. I intend to sell the
> majority of the timber to generate
> cash. There is also a 3bd/1ba
> house on the property that i plan
> on renting out.

> The next tract is only 3 acres. It
> is all cleared land, already
> fenced with barbed wire, has a
> small creek and a 3bd/2ba house on
> it that I intend to rent out.

> I would appreciate any suggestions
> you may have to help make a
> decision.

> Thanks for your input, Robert

[email protected]
 

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