Hard Pill to Swallow

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CowboyRam

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Riverton Wyoming
For the last several weeks I have been on the road. I have lost track of how many times I have been to the ranch. I have been as far south as Castle Dale Utah, and as far north as Sundance Wyoming. I brought home a crippled cow and her calf about mid week, move some cows back into the pasture after they got out and where in a neighbors pasture. Saturday I went back to the ranch to trade out trailers. My uncle got a call from Union Pacific that a cow had been hit by a train. We had to confirm that it was one of mine, yep it had, in fact several got hit. Two cows had a gash down the length of her back, one split in two, and one you could see the grass in her stomach. My uncle called me at noon today and he found two more pairs in the pasture south of the tracks; he was going to try go get them in the pasture today. Tomorrow I'm going to take the bull I got from a guy in South Dakota, this bull turned out to be batshit crazy. The next morning after I unloaded him I was going to brand, and he was going to take me. I don't want those genetics in my calves. Besides he would only get worse as he gets older.

We trailed some cows until it got dark on us Saturday night; didn't get in until 11pm, stayed at the ranch with the intention of getting out early Sunday morning to see if we could find any more cows. A buddy of mine and his friend came to help, and they got everything they could find off the railroad ride-away. I'm going out with a buddy that has a drone and we are going to see if we can find the rest. I can handle when losing 1 or 2, but having 9 dead, 15 cows and one bull unaccounted for has been hard. I am emotionally and physically exhausted.
 
I sure hate that all that has happened.
That would be hard to take for sure.
I remember back probably as much as 35 years ago going down a road and looking down over at a railroad track and seeing 8-9 dead cows that had been hit by a train in Madison County KY.
I was just a teenage child then, but even at that time I understood the massive loss that whoever they belonged to had.
 
For the last several weeks I have been on the road. I have lost track of how many times I have been to the ranch. I have been as far south as Castle Dale Utah, and as far north as Sundance Wyoming. I brought home a crippled cow and her calf about mid week, move some cows back into the pasture after they got out and where in a neighbors pasture. Saturday I went back to the ranch to trade out trailers. My uncle got a call from Union Pacific that a cow had been hit by a train. We had to confirm that it was one of mine, yep it had, in fact several got hit. Two cows had a gash down the length of her back, one split in two, and one you could see the grass in her stomach. My uncle called me at noon today and he found two more pairs in the pasture south of the tracks; he was going to try go get them in the pasture today. Tomorrow I'm going to take the bull I got from a guy in South Dakota, this bull turned out to be batshit crazy. The next morning after I unloaded him I was going to brand, and he was going to take me. I don't want those genetics in my calves. Besides he would only get worse as he gets older.

We trailed some cows until it got dark on us Saturday night; didn't get in until 11pm, stayed at the ranch with the intention of getting out early Sunday morning to see if we could find any more cows. A buddy of mine and his friend came to help, and they got everything they could find off the railroad ride-away. I'm going out with a buddy that has a drone and we are going to see if we can find the rest. I can handle when losing 1 or 2, but having 9 dead, 15 cows and one bull unaccounted for has been hard. I am emotionally and physically exhausted.
That's a rough week by any standard. Here the old deeds show that the railroad is responsible for maintaining the fence and they will pay for any the train hits and will build a new fence. But you must show them the deed.
 
For the last several weeks I have been on the road. I have lost track of how many times I have been to the ranch. I have been as far south as Castle Dale Utah, and as far north as Sundance Wyoming. I brought home a crippled cow and her calf about mid week, move some cows back into the pasture after they got out and where in a neighbors pasture. Saturday I went back to the ranch to trade out trailers. My uncle got a call from Union Pacific that a cow had been hit by a train. We had to confirm that it was one of mine, yep it had, in fact several got hit. Two cows had a gash down the length of her back, one split in two, and one you could see the grass in her stomach. My uncle called me at noon today and he found two more pairs in the pasture south of the tracks; he was going to try go get them in the pasture today. Tomorrow I'm going to take the bull I got from a guy in South Dakota, this bull turned out to be batshit crazy. The next morning after I unloaded him I was going to brand, and he was going to take me. I don't want those genetics in my calves. Besides he would only get worse as he gets older.

We trailed some cows until it got dark on us Saturday night; didn't get in until 11pm, stayed at the ranch with the intention of getting out early Sunday morning to see if we could find any more cows. A buddy of mine and his friend came to help, and they got everything they could find off the railroad ride-away. I'm going out with a buddy that has a drone and we are going to see if we can find the rest. I can handle when losing 1 or 2, but having 9 dead, 15 cows and one bull unaccounted for has been hard. I am emotionally and physically exhausted.
That's awful CowboyRam, I feel for you. I hope things take a turn for the better.
 
Railroad right of ways are supposed to be maintained by the RR if they are active. But who the hell knows in these crazy times. For the price of nine cows they may decide to fight it in court. Good luck...
 
A long time (over 50 years) neighbor of mine retired from his town job at nearly 80. He was still fit as most in their 60s and able to care for a good sized herd of cows on his hill farm. We had a severe thunderstorm and he lost about 20 head due to a lightning strike. He was never the same afterwards. Dementia set in and in a few short years he was gone.
This cattleman's life can be tough. We all need treasure somewhere safe where thieves, rust or hard luck can't reach it.
When we are young, we tough it out and things usually get better. It is harder when we are old.
 
Here the railroad hasn't been maintaining the fences. Some claim the railroad told them it is cheaper to pay for cows than it is to do up keep on the fences. Actually up keep on the fences would require a lot of miles of new fence.
 
Here the railroad hasn't been maintaining the fences. Some claim the railroad told them it is cheaper to pay for cows than it is to do up keep on the fences. Actually up keep on the fences would require a lot of miles of new fence.
Fences are expensive, no doubt. Around here I see abandoned fences all the time that haven't been repaired in decades, and the T-posts are just fine and the barb wire could be salvaged too. Hard to salvage a fence and most people wouldn't do it... but I could pull a hundred dollars in T-posts in less than an hour and they are just being wasted.
 
Here the railroad hasn't been maintaining the fences. Some claim the railroad told them it is cheaper to pay for cows than it is to do up keep on the fences. Actually up keep on the fences would require a lot of miles of new fence.
They dont maintain them here either until someone presses them to do it. It never goes to court. If something happens they will pay for the cattle and a new fence.
 
A friend over by Baker who is right on the RR tracks said, "If one gets hit a 400 pound rat tail heifer turns into a 600 pound prized steer." Hand them a bill and make sure that you price the cows high enough to cover the loss.
 
A long time (over 50 years) neighbor of mine retired from his town job at nearly 80. He was still fit as most in their 60s and able to care for a good sized herd of cows on his hill farm. We had a severe thunderstorm and he lost about 20 head due to a lightning strike. He was never the same afterwards. Dementia set in and in a few short years he was gone.
This cattleman's life can be tough. We all need treasure somewhere safe where thieves, rust or hard luck can't reach it.
When we are young, we tough it out and things usually get better. It is harder when we are old.
Well said. I lost a few things when I was younger. I guess I didn't care about them as much as I thought I did back then, or maybe it was because I was still so full of pizz and vinegar and knew I could recover.
As we realize our age, we also realize that we caint do that stuff anymore. It can be a bit depressing. Recovering takes on a level of effort I didn't consider as a young man.
 
I was talking with a friend and he said that his father used to process claims for UP. He said I should say each and every cow was $10000 show cow, and they would just pay it. That just seems unethical to me. I'm ok with padding it a bit, but not say a commercial cow is a show cow.
 

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