Halter breaking?

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PNZMAN

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dude it almost sounds like your gonna have to start from square one get the calf in a 12x12 pen use a old showstick and rope halter halter him and tie him up wait 5 to 10 minutes and start brushing him and the same time also rubbin and scratching him . also use the showstick to scratch his belly like you would in the show ring get him to calm down once he does let him go take the haleter off. leave him in the pen and do the same thing next day getting longer and longer in time every day with in two weeks he wont pull from you or run away cause you have taught him that your nice and gonna scratch him and help him relax

it should work
later
 

DOC HARRIS

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milkmaid":18gp6sd1 said:
Well...right now I'd say you've got a potentially embarrassing problem on your hands. 8) I had a 6 y/o, 1200lb Holstein nurse cow last summer that I tried halter breaking, which was quite an adventure. Yes, she did end up broke to lead, BUT, I made the mistake of putting myself (and her) in situations where she could (and did) run away from me before she was tame enough to try leading. The end result was that I had an animal who would drop her head and bolt for no apparent reason at any moment - and usually when I had people watching. :p :oops: Always happens that way! Oh - and that was with two chains on, one under the jaw and one through the mouth, and she'd still bolt.

After that, I've decided that I have plenty of time to work with animals. Lots and lots of time being tied before I try leading...until the animal understands that there's no getting away from the rope. Ever.

Food-for-thought: tame and halter-broke go hand-in-hand. Hard to have a calf that's well trained and halter broke, but wilder than a March hare. Just doesn't happen very often.

You could try putting that steer in a smaller pen until realizes he can't get away with running, and you could work on getting him tamer. There's no substitute for spending time with them.

I like the pressure-and-release method of halter-breaking: pressure on the lead rope, animal takes one step, release the pressure (loose lead), there's his reward. More pressure, 'nuther step...

Now, all that looks great on paper, and it would sure be nice if it went that easily. LOL. Good luck. =)
Agree with everything you said, Milkmaid! Pressure, release - REWARD
Presure-release-REWARD
Pressure-release-REWARD (rubbing, scratching, smooth talking, just like when you are on a date!)
 

choward6200jd

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I am a FFA Teacher and I may have some help for you.

My advice would to be to contact the RFD Website they have a video on THE Cattle Show about halter breaking cattle. I have used the video myself and it works better than anything else I have used.

1st Place calf in pen
2nd Use showstick and rub on claf until he stops running the pen
3rd Use hands and rub claf until he will not run from you
4th Place halter on calf
5th put a little pressure on claf nad when he moves let up on the pressure
this takes a couple of days but it works
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showme

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tom4018":3flpglnv said:
Daughter is in her first year of FFA aan is going to try to show a couple of calves. Been helping her work with them but he steer we have is a toughone. Been leaving him tied up to a post for a while but he stills tryie to run when you lead him. He has gotten away a couple times but here recently I have been able to stop him. Any suggestions to help with this? Read were some people suggest using an atv and others don't. Just want to him him controlable so she and him will be safe.

I tell you what go to Mexico or your nearest sale barn a purchase you a mean donkey. They run $300-$1200 they help you so much. That calf wil learn to listen when that donkey puts his foot in his mouth.

1st I put a halter on them for about 4 days
2nd tie up for about a week week in a half eye level
3rd then tie them up high depending on how bad
4th start to walk them in a small area so if them run they don't have much room.
5th if they are runnig around like race horses after 3-4 weeks
it is really time for a donkey
6th tie them up for about 8 hours a day 5 hours with there head low so they can lay down. The other 3 hours with there head high. Play blaring music
7th give them alot of attention so they get use to a human
8th bring halter broken calves around him and lead him with that calf.

Really that is what I do and have broke every calf I have attemted donkeys are really cheap. The best donkey we got is one from mexico. Hope this helps
 

Ohio2

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I like the pressure-and-release method of halter-breaking: pressure on the lead rope, animal takes one step, release the pressure (loose lead), there's his reward. More pressure, 'nuther step...

Milk maid is right on with that one. :heart:

We also start training them as soon as possible, 350/400 lbs. When it's this hot they start looking forward to the rinsing and the bath everyday. You have to do that out of sight from their mommas tho...They will tend to RUN back to the pasture when they hear or see her!

Staying shoulder to shoulder with them while leading works pretty well too. Our girls get impatient and want to walk too far in front of the calf's head. That makes the calf balk.

Also, we've NEVER given a big untrained steer to a little one. Our 16 year old could probably handle 800+ lb. un-trained animal pretty well, but not the 9 and 12 yr olds!

What ever you decide to do, be consistant and start doing it everyday or twice a day if possible. Unless that steer has a screw loose, he will get the idea!

Good Luck!
 

brandon__rox

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Hi i am 15 years old and have been in 4-h since i was 8. With my steers i always leave a halter on them in the pen so it is really easy to catch him and he halter breaks him self. to lead break him i use my tractor and them lead him after.
 

kaneranch

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some one told me that if you leave the halter and lead rope on them that it not only makes the stopping easier but the walking to, beacause it makes there neck a little sore and they will cooperate a little easier. I am not sure how true this is but they said it works for them. Thanks Kaneranch
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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After I get the calves used to being in a pen in the barn during the day, than I put a halter on them (in the chute) and let them drag it day & night. Yes, they learn to stop when there is pressure on the rope. Also, when I start working with them, it makes it easier to "catch" them. I pick up the end of the rope, & try to walk to their heads before they feel that I am holding the rope. This takes a few days. Once I can handle their face/head, than I start tying the rope around their neck. When I can walk up to their head & fix/wiggle their halter easily, than I take it off when I turn them out.

Of course, each day, I am tying them up morning & evening, brushing them, scratching them, finding the "good" spots that they like scratched. Usually, after the first day of being tied, I can catch them & tie their head up while I brush them.
The first day they are tied, we tie them low, about shoulder high on them to rings on solid walls. They can get "scuffed up" but can't get a leg caught in any bars. They rarely "fight" the rope for more than a few minutes, after having been dragging the halter around. They learn to step forward or backwards to release the pressure.

I usually leave them tied about 15-30 minutes at the same place they have been getting fed. Generally, the second time we tie them, we feed them a little of their grain. I say a little, because they often spill it.

The second or third day, I can usually catch them, tie them to the opposite side of the pen with their heads up, brush them & walk them to their grain. Now I'm talking about a distant of about 12 feet. I put the grain down, making sure they are paying attention to it, untie them, turn them around, and they only have to take a few steps to their feed.
My husband catches them the first two times (he's 6'3" 200#) than I usually can handle them by myself (5'2" 120#)
 

AAOK

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":34tsvngm said:
After I get the calves used to being in a pen in the barn during the day, than I put a halter on them (in the chute) and let them drag it day & night. Yes, they learn to stop when there is pressure on the rope. Also, when I start working with them, it makes it easier to "catch" them. I pick up the end of the rope, & try to walk to their heads before they feel that I am holding the rope. This takes a few days. Once I can handle their face/head, than I start tying the rope around their neck. When I can walk up to their head & fix/wiggle their halter easily, than I take it off when I turn them out.

Of course, each day, I am tying them up morning & evening, brushing them, scratching them, finding the "good" spots that they like scratched. Usually, after the first day of being tied, I can catch them & tie their head up while I brush them.
The first day they are tied, we tie them low, about shoulder high on them to rings on solid walls. They can get "scuffed up" but can't get a leg caught in any bars. They rarely "fight" the rope for more than a few minutes, after having been dragging the halter around. They learn to step forward or backwards to release the pressure.

I usually leave them tied about 15-30 minutes at the same place they have been getting fed. Generally, the second time we tie them, we feed them a little of their grain. I say a little, because they often spill it.

The second or third day, I can usually catch them, tie them to the opposite side of the pen with their heads up, brush them & walk them to their grain. Now I'm talking about a distant of about 12 feet. I put the grain down, making sure they are paying attention to it, untie them, turn them around, and they only have to take a few steps to their feed.
My husband catches them the first two times (he's 6'3" 200#) than I usually can handle them by myself (5'2" 120#)

Look this over closely. You won't find anything better than this. Kindness works!!! Forget the Donkeys and tractors.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Why thank you AAOK. As I said, I'm not very big or very strong (arthitis real bad in hands). I'm the one home all day & the cattle are my job. After a few years of MY way of breaking calves, my husband is a firm believer. He used to want to "bully" them around. It's much better to "ask" them to do things with gentle tugs.
I use the tug & release method. Actually, I "tap" the halter several times, than put more pressure. As soon as they take 1 step (or 1/2 step) I release the pressure & pet them while I loosen the halter around their nose. We sell our cattle to lots of juniors & have always been complimented on how well they always behave. Even after just 2 weeks of handling. They may have to "pull" them because they may "balk" but I rarely have ever had a "runaway".
 

AAOK

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Jeanee,
Exactly the some thing I do, right down to loosening the halter, and petting them. I also get right in their left ear after they have done good and tell them all about it. Seems to help with head clipping, judges rubbing up around the shoulders, etc.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Yes, close up contact really helps. When I'm getting them used to the halter, going on & off, I wiggle it around, scratching their ears & sides of their faces. Hubby always made fun of me, but now he does the same thing. Also, when I put the halter on the new calves, I NEVER immediatly tie them. Put halter on, clean pen, go to next pen doing the same. THEN, I go back & tie all of them. If you walk up to them, put halter on & drag them over to tie rail, they soon learn that they DO NOT like you to put that halter on - it means getting tied. Necessary or not??? Don't know, but everyone buying our cattle rave about how easy they can catch their calf. Calves walk right up to you & want you to "cuddle" with their faces.
Now there is a fine line with bulls, after they are truly broke, been shown (calves), I still scratch their chin & ears, but from the side. Don't want them putting their head on me.
 

aussie_cowgirl

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mistake 1. letting him go. he has now learned that he can get away if he wants. Get a really strong guy to take him for a walk around the yards. AND DONT LET GO! Ever heard of a nose rope, dont yank it but it will make him stop fast with a bit of tension applied. Its gonna take a bit of time coz he knows he can get away though. patience is necessary though
 

The Show Maker

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HI I show brahman cattle ,
Yea they will get wild some times and get loos from u but if u got an open stall that u can put him in then put about a 3ft or 4ft lead rope on him and let him walk around on and then he will lead just fine in about 2 weeks or a little more but make sure u keep brushing on him in the stall and if that dont work then ring him that helps keep that no's up so they want get a way from you but try that i have broke a bull in less then 1 1/2 and now he is ready to show... but thats what i do to break my show cattle o yea and make sure that u use a chane rope halter with the chain under the shin so he can fell it when ih is steping on the rope in the stall ..
Jason
 

ziggyb

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choward6200jd":3sc4cjzb said:
I am a FFA Teacher and I may have some help for you.

My advice would to be to contact the RFD Website they have a video on THE Cattle Show about halter breaking cattle. I have used the video myself and it works better than anything else I have used.

1st Place calf in pen
2nd Use showstick and rub on claf until he stops running the pen
3rd Use hands and rub claf until he will not run from you
4th Place halter on calf
5th put a little pressure on claf nad when he moves let up on the pressure
this takes a couple of days but it works
[email protected]

This is the method we use now. After watching the Cattle Show on RFD with this method we have used it exclusively and it has worked everytime. We can walk into a stall after 1 week and just wait for the animal to get to its comfort corner and then walk up and place the halter on. We use 2 halters tied together to give more leverage in the first couple of days. Using the method of extending the lead rope all the way out and letting the calf come to you for the first couple of weeks works great. We have cows in the pasture that were halter broke as calves with this method and we can walk right out into the pasture and place the halter on them anytime we want to and lead them anywhere we want.

Good Luck and always stay calm. Animals can since fear and frustration. Try not to look directly at the calves when beginning to work with them. Stand sideways to them and they will not sense you as a threat.
 

aplusmnt

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Follow the suggestions of AAOK and Jeanne and in no time you will be leading her around.

Down this same line I had to show this gentle approach to my son this weekend. We are breaking a steer around 700lbs. We have tied him a couple days and he has been dragging a halter (when he does not get it off). Well my son was trying to lead him and the steer was being stubborn. My son gets a little mad at times (red hair I guess) and just kept pulling and yanking and steer would not go. So I took the lead rope, pulled him a few feet then stopped and scratched his head. Then pulled him a few feet and scratched and rubbed on him again. After a couple minutes of this he lead around the corral like he has been broke for months. He never locked up or tried to get away. Gentle can go a long ways!
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Yes, you have to stay calm, gentle, & relaxed. NEVER play tug of war with them. They always win & learn to be more stubborn. If they won't come forward, pull sideways to get 1 step, then reward. And again I remind you all to keep them in a SMALL area, so even if they bolt, they never THINK they got away. Use a long rope on the halter.
 

novatech

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There a lot of methods here that would prob. work.
I have learned a lot from them myself.
The problem that I see is that you have already taught the calf to run and get away. Never should have let the calf into an area large enough area to do that. Retraining my be tougher than you think. Small pen, long rope. Good luck, and don,t let go.
 

allenfarms

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I had a friend that had a steer his boy was gonna show, but he was trying to halter break him, and that steer would just lock his legs and not move. This guy has broke horses for years, he did the same thing with the steer that he did with horses.....

tied him to the rear bumber on the truck and made him walk.

The steer unlike a horse just laid down and let him drag him. He would pull a foot or two and stop after an hour the steer would walk and did so after that by hand. Crazy, but it worked.
 

aplusmnt

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allenfarms":3t3gdkxs said:
I had a friend that had a steer his boy was gonna show, but he was trying to halter break him, and that steer would just lock his legs and not move. This guy has broke horses for years, he did the same thing with the steer that he did with horses.....

tied him to the rear bumber on the truck and made him walk.

The steer unlike a horse just laid down and let him drag him. He would pull a foot or two and stop after an hour the steer would walk and did so after that by hand. Crazy, but it worked.

We tried this with one heifer a couple years ago. Broke 2 lead ropes and cut her pretty bad. Never could get her to lead by force. Tied her up with no feed or water. Then untied her and put feed bucket in front of her, she let us lead her to the feed, kept moving the feed a few feet then say 50 feet. Took one day of doing this and by the second day my 7 year old could lead her anywhere he wanted.

She was very gentle just stubborn like a mule about leading.
 

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