Halter breaking?

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tom4018

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We have only halter broke weanlings, is it much more trouble to break a yearling? Daughter has found a couple yearlings that are pretty good but a little concerned about how hard they will be to break.
 

milkmaid

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I haven't found it much harder, and I've broke everything from little calves to old cows.

Go for it -- and post pics when you bring the calf home. ;-)
 

Avalon

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Really jsut depends on the personality of the calf. If they are not crazy, go for it. May take a bit more time but just like anything. Being Gentle, Firm & Constistant should get it done.
 

Chris H

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We broke a 17 month old heifer last fall. She's as high headed as any Hereford you'll find. We pulled her off the pasture with one other heifer for company in a pen about 20x20. We hand fed them for several weeks and stood around as they ate. We gradually started using a scotch comb on them as they ate and soon they wanted scratched more than the feed. We also carried the rope halter with us after they were looking forward to us visiting. We were able to slip the halter on the calmer heifer with no problem. The high headed one we ran into the chute, put the halter on, and brushed her until she stopped fussing about the halter. Then I tied the halter on the outside of the chute and opened the chute. She hit the end of the rope and just fought it a bit. I left and came back an hour later to find she had gotten the halter untied and was loose in the small pen. I walked up, took the end of the rope, and slowly walked her around. She was still spooky, but she knew she could trust us. We worked with her several more weeks, then turned her loose.
Last week she calved and lost the calf due to a malpresentation. We slipped a halter on her and led her to another pen and grafted an extra twin on her. Several people who saw her last year when we first penned her said we'd never get her broke. It wasn't her fault she lost her calf this year and because she can earn her keep by raising a spare twin she'll get another chance.

So, yes, breaking yearlings is possible, just take your time with them.
 

Misty

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not to rub it in or anything but............my son brought his heifer home yesterday (Wed). They had a tough time getting her tied up. Tonight, they went out and she led right to the fence with no problems....I love her!!!
 

kimbaljd

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We have a Brangus heifer that I have been fighting for a while. She is pretty calm but when I walk her she kind of pulls her head down towards the ground. She seems to do better for my daughter. She gives me no trouble when I tie her up. And she does pretty good when I tie her up and wash her out. Getting frustrated, but atleast the fair isnt till October.
 

Snider_Angus

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I dont like to brag but i will today.
1. Last summer i got my first show heifer. She is out of our herd of Commercial Angus cows (nothing fancy at all). I got a horse and rope and picked her out of the herd and loaded her in the trailer to bring home.. i put the halter on in the trailer at the pasture. I got her home opened the gate to let her out of the trailer(holding onto the rope) she jumped out and i walked her right to the fence to tie her up. In 45 min. i had her to where she would let you touch her all over and do just about anything around her head and ears.. We were walking in the front yard of my house the next day.....
2. I just bought a steer yesterday. Had only been haltered and tie 1 time. Tied him at the Vet Clinic for 30 min while i was paying for everything.. loaded him up and the vet tied him in for me and he rode 30 min. home tied up in the trailer. I got him home and took him straight to the tie rail and tied him next to the heifer from the first story. He went crazy a couple times but by the end of the night he was calm and would let you comb him.... I went out before school this morning at 5:30 and started working with him to lead and after 1 or 2 times of him trying to get away he started to respect the rope. and would follow me anywhere i pulled by 8:00 a.m.

Anything is possible if you just stay persistant and you dont let them get away with things they aren't allowed and you will be fine. but YEARLINGS are a little more dangerous than a 660 lb. steer.
 
A

Anonymous

Yearlings are just as easy to break in. Very few of our animals are broken before they are 12months. Our sale bulls are broken in at 18 to 24 months and I have no problems.
It is all about PATIENCE, POSITIVE ATTITUDE and PERSISTENCE. Don't expect things to happen overnight, and don't lose your temper.
 
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tom4018

tom4018

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Killala":2nzhkiup said:
Yearlings are just as easy to break in. Very few of our animals are broken before they are 12months. Our sale bulls are broken in at 18 to 24 months and I have no problems.
It is all about PATIENCE, POSITIVE ATTITUDE and PERSISTENCE. Don't expect things to happen overnight, and don't lose your temper.
Well she ended up buying the yearling. Got to work with her for about a week. Her temperment is pretty good but my daughter thinks she is stubborn. Any suggestions from keeping my daughter from getting discouraged?
 

show steer up

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Be by her side all the way, point out the little changes and let her know every day will bring her a little bit closer to the goal.
Washing does wonders to the animals temperment and is a lot of fun for the kids.
In my family the girls just love washing and blowdrying their animals. My boys tend to try and take shortcuts. Just be careful and set the blower on low, stand back a few feet till the animal calms down. In a few weeks she will see a great improvement.
If you have and show how fun it is, the kids tend to follow in your steps :D .
Have a great time :D its a wonderful bonding tool to keep the family together :heart:
 

novatech

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ScottP":1yl26iuh said:
I have used this method on Brahmans and F1 Brafords for the last couple of years. From weaning age to yearlings. Fastest and easiest way I have found. Although sometimes it takes a lot longer than it did with the guy in the video.
I do not show cattle but have found that when Brahman influenced cattle are halter broke they will bring more $. Not to mention they are a lot easier to work and safer.
 

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