Had to pull Calf last night ....

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Anonymous

Howdy all - had to pull, or at least assist with a calf from a longhorn heifer last night. What a trip - and the momma didn't seem to want to have anything to do with the calf. So we pinned 'em up and MADE the relationship work!!! But i got to tell you - those "lonnnng horns" sure are an issue when working in close contact with a freakish female!

Alex Fullingim Circle A Ranch Red Bluff, CA
 
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Anonymous

I thought Long Horns never had to be watched during calving? And about the horns sound like a real good way to get killed. I've been around animals with horns and they damn sure know how to use them against people and other cattle. Long Horns sound like the ideal breed to own, where can i get some?

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

Longhorns are probably like most breeds - if you don't pay attention to epd's and genetics, you can buy a bull that throws large calves.

My neighbor bought a Longhorn bull to breed to his Hereford heifers. He pulled a 130 pound calf and lost the heifer. Guess he didn't pay attention to the genetics somewhere along the line.

Of course, maybe Alex's calf came backwards, which can happen with any breed.

Personally, I won't deal with horns. All of our stock is polled.

> I thought Long Horns never had to
> be watched during calving? And
> about the horns sound like a real
> good way to get killed. I've been
> around animals with horns and they
> damn sure know how to use them
> against people and other cattle.
> Long Horns sound like the ideal
> breed to own, where can i get
> some?
 
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A

Anonymous

Sorry to hear about your calving problem! A lot of variables could have caused that to happen. The average range of Longhorn calf weights is between about 50 and 65 lbs. As one of the other posters said in this thread, could have been some genetic things involved. Longhorns have a larger pelvic opening when calving than a number of the other breeds as well which aids in easy calving. Even HUGH longhorn bulls will sire the usual longhorn weight calves. Case in point: One of our 1,000 lb females was sired by her former owner's 2000# bull which produced a 61 lb calf for us. On another one of her pregnancies, about an 1,800 lb bull from another breeder was the sire which gave us a 49# calf. As to the disposition of the Mama--yes, you can get a very over-protective dam (one reason they have survived over the hundreds of years) as well as a very people-friendly calm mama. We've found that the more you walk around them, talk to them, and gain their trust we can (in most cases) pick up the newborn calf and weigh it without mama causing a problem. I must also refer back to genetics, and "disposition breeding". When walking through a longhorn herd one can usually tell who are the "nice" ones and if there is one or more that might have an attitude. I think most of us longhorn breeders sincerely try to breed out and cull to the freezer any female or male that has serious calving or disposition problems. After all...it's not good for business and marketing if one is turning out honery critters, right?
 

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