Had a round with a bull today.

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CowboyRam

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Us dads sometimes have a hard time letting go of things we have always been able to do .
I am thankful that he can still do some of it. He is 86, will turn 87 in February. There times I could do things fast myself, but I bite my tung every so often and just let him do it even though it will take longer. I think it is good to keep him involved, it keeps his mind and body active.
 
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Funny story my grandma use to tell . A neighbor asked to fish in their pond where my great uncles had his registered polled Hereford cattle . The lady went fishing and stayed for a long time so my grandpa decided he better go check on her . He found her up a tree next to the pond with the herd bull nearby grazing . Grandpa asked her why she was up that tree . She replied: I figured it was easier climbing this tree than having a Hereford calf . Seems the bull got a little close for comfort. 🤣
Now that's funny! Sounds like something Mama Gladys would have done - and said. Gotta love those spunky Pisgah ladies (and I'm using that term loosely).
 

kenny thomas

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I have been feeding my 450 pound steers some grain. I have to go into the pen with buckets. I started packing a flag. They were just crowding my space. Not being aggressive, just crowding in. Walking on the snow and ice I don't want to get bumped off my feet. The flag keeps them back a bit.
One of my best investments was an alleyway from 4 pastures that lead to the lots. I can close gates to the pastures and pour the feed into the troughs without calves, cows, bulls being around me.
 

Dave

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One of my best investments was an alleyway from 4 pastures that lead to the lots. I can close gates to the pastures and pour the feed into the troughs without calves, cows, bulls being around me.
I could close a gate but I would have to chase them out of there first. They are waiting for me every morning. The ones not waiting come running at the first sound I make.
 

kenny thomas

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I could close a gate but I would have to chase them out of there first. They are waiting for me every morning. The ones not waiting come running at the first sound I make.
I do close a gate but usually it's after they finish eating the day before. Mine will be standing at the gate when it's time to eat.
 
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Ky hills

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One of my best investments was an alleyway from 4 pastures that lead to the lots. I can close gates to the pastures and pour the feed into the troughs without calves, cows, bulls being around me.
We are set up like that too, have a lotted off feeding area that is accessible from 3 fields. Sure makes it safer and easier to get feed put out. Have a far field that we have to go through them to feed that gets hairy, always want to get them out of there before much feeding had to be done.
 

Travlr

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I could close a gate but I would have to chase them out of there first. They are waiting for me every morning. The ones not waiting come running at the first sound I make.
Maybe close it at night before you relax for the evening?

Just a random thought... I used to feed in the evening because I figured the animals could use the energy better at night in the cold. I found out that the cows tended to calve the next day during daylight hours.
 

Dave

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Maybe close it at night before you relax for the evening?

Just a random thought... I used to feed in the evening because I figured the animals could use the energy better at night in the cold. I found out that the cows tended to calve the next day during daylight hours.
It is several gates which would limit the steers ability to get to one of the loafing sheds should they want cover from a storm. Possible to do but complicated. Easier to just take that flag with me. It has been working good and they are just 450 pound steers not something I am concerned about like I would if I had a snotty bull or cow in the mix.
 

farmerjan

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The pasture where I am feeding some to train the calves to come in through the creep gate, we moved all the heifers there recently and they are well trained to buckets so they come running. My son is 6-6 and so he has more size and muscle and is faster on his feet than I am since I had the ankle and knees replaced. When it is muddy, like @Dave with the snow and ice, I am more concerned that they will just push and I will slip in the mud and not be able to get back on my feet fast enough.... There were about 8-10 cows there from earlier... a couple had spring calves, my nurse cow with 3 calves and some for fall calves because we had alot of grass there and wanted them closer. Then when he weaned off the heifers and some came home from a few pastures, needed a place to put them so they all got stuck here since there is no bull and none close by. Took 3 out with fall calves the other day to go another place with a bull... will take 5 to be preg checked since they had a chance to get bred before the bull came out in late June... they have calves on them... will pull them, take them to get preg checked and if so, will go with other spring calving cows and the calves will stay with the weaned ones. It's time to wean them anyway. 2 cows are last calf cows... one has some lameness, and she does a great job but we are afraid she might just get down... gotten bred back so fast the last 3 times and it's pushing our luck... her front teats were huge this time... enough reason for her to go... The other is a nurse cow that would not take any extra calves last time... her udder is shot, took a long time to rebreed, and she has some age... time to go.
Once I get the rest of the other cows out, there will only be 3 left there... the 3rd is my longhorn and she will stand there and wait for me to put grain down for her... no pushing or shoving or nothing... I feed her a little away from the rest so she doesn't get pushy at the bunk... and then the rest of the weaned calves won't be so bad...

I like the idea of the flag that @Dave is using... is it a flag on a sorting stick? I just might get one to try it...
It is so wet and slick from the mud with the rain we had the other day, and the ground thawing...since the temps warmed up so much... NOT going to screw up these new knees since they are finally getting a bit more useable....
 

greybeard

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Funny story my grandma use to tell . A neighbor asked to fish in their pond where my great uncles had his registered polled Hereford cattle . The lady went fishing and stayed for a long time so my grandpa decided he better go check on her . He found her up a tree next to the pond with the herd bull nearby grazing . Grandpa asked her why she was up that tree . She replied: I figured it was easier climbing this tree than having a Hereford calf . Seems the bull got a little close for comfort. 🤣
I learned not to walk across this pasture down to the pond with a minnow bucket in my hand.......

may2014_019_(640x480).jpg
 
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I have been feeding my 450 pound steers some grain. I have to go into the pen with buckets. I started packing a flag. They were just crowding my space. Not being aggressive, just crowding in. Walking on the snow and ice I don't want to get bumped off my feet. The flag keeps them back a bit.
I got bumped feeding the cows and ended up in the feed bunk, still clutching the bucket with cubes all over me. Didn't phase the cows and they continued to eat around - and ON me. I felt like the main course at a buffet. Learned my lesson and now dump the cubes from one end of the bunk, then use the bucket as a shield (or weapon) when I make my escape.
 

Dave

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I like the idea of the flag that @Dave is using... is it a flag on a sorting stick? I just might get one to try it...
Yep, a sorting stick flag. A little wave and they stay back. Once in a while I will tap one one the back and they move out of my way.
One time back on the coast when I was raising bred heifers I went out to feed them. The troughs were at the edge of the concrete. The day before one had stepped on my foot. So I had my feet close together. There was a slight slope coming up to the concrete. The heifers had a worn trail on that slope where they always walked. One walking across behind me bumped me with her belly which spun me around and I landed on my back in the trail. 60 heifers using that trail there was a couple inches of cow manure lining the trail. I slid on my back for about 15 feet. The whole time yelling and cussing like a mad man. I was laying with my head down hill on my back sort of like a turtle. I managed to turn over and get to my feet. Entirely covered with cow manure.
 

Travlr

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The pasture where I am feeding some to train the calves to come in through the creep gate, we moved all the heifers there recently and they are well trained to buckets so they come running. My son is 6-6 and so he has more size and muscle and is faster on his feet than I am since I had the ankle and knees replaced. When it is muddy, like @Dave with the snow and ice, I am more concerned that they will just push and I will slip in the mud and not be able to get back on my feet fast enough.... There were about 8-10 cows there from earlier... a couple had spring calves, my nurse cow with 3 calves and some for fall calves because we had alot of grass there and wanted them closer. Then when he weaned off the heifers and some came home from a few pastures, needed a place to put them so they all got stuck here since there is no bull and none close by. Took 3 out with fall calves the other day to go another place with a bull... will take 5 to be preg checked since they had a chance to get bred before the bull came out in late June... they have calves on them... will pull them, take them to get preg checked and if so, will go with other spring calving cows and the calves will stay with the weaned ones. It's time to wean them anyway. 2 cows are last calf cows... one has some lameness, and she does a great job but we are afraid she might just get down... gotten bred back so fast the last 3 times and it's pushing our luck... her front teats were huge this time... enough reason for her to go... The other is a nurse cow that would not take any extra calves last time... her udder is shot, took a long time to rebreed, and she has some age... time to go.
Once I get the rest of the other cows out, there will only be 3 left there... the 3rd is my longhorn and she will stand there and wait for me to put grain down for her... no pushing or shoving or nothing... I feed her a little away from the rest so she doesn't get pushy at the bunk... and then the rest of the weaned calves won't be so bad...

I like the idea of the flag that @Dave is using... is it a flag on a sorting stick? I just might get one to try it...
It is so wet and slick from the mud with the rain we had the other day, and the ground thawing...since the temps warmed up so much... NOT going to screw up these new knees since they are finally getting a bit more useable....
I tie a plastic bag on a stick. The noise gets their attention as much as what they see.
 

Dave

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A portion of the motley crew waiting for me at the gate. You will note that the flag is flying sideways. It is 19 degrees with about a 20+ mph wind this morning. A lovely morning. They are ready to eat. I am ready to get back in the house.

P1013071.JPG
 

Lee VanRoss

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A portion of the motley crew waiting for me at the gate. You will note that the flag is flying sideways. It is 19 degrees with about a 20+ mph wind this morning. A lovely morning. They are ready to eat. I am ready to get back in the house.

View attachment 24489
Those eyes are as jewels! Phenomenal picture. Thanks!
 

wbvs58

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I got bumped feeding the cows and ended up in the feed bunk, still clutching the bucket with cubes all over me. Didn't phase the cows and they continued to eat around - and ON me. I felt like the main course at a buffet. Learned my lesson and now dump the cubes from one end of the bunk, then use the bucket as a shield (or weapon) when I make my escape.
I definitely think we should take up a collection to buy you that GoPro TC. It would be worth every penny I feel.

Ken
 

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