H Brace Material

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Stocker Steve

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dun":39w0j0fi said:
I use nothing but floating braces. The only problem with them is if they are on the cow side of the fence they will rub on them and eventually cause issues, like knocking them down and or breaking them

I have used a lot of "Speed Brace" brackets to make one wire T post cross fences. They work well as long as you do not hook them with equipment. :(

Do you find wood perimeter floating braces are a lot faster, or save one post, or both?
 

dun

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Stocker Steve":23e2xrin said:
dun":23e2xrin said:
I use nothing but floating braces. The only problem with them is if they are on the cow side of the fence they will rub on them and eventually cause issues, like knocking them down and or breaking them

I have used a lot of "Speed Brace" brackets to make one wire T post cross fences. They work well as long as you do not hook them with equipment. :(

Do you find wood perimeter floating braces are a lot faster, or save one post, or both?
Faster and they save the drugery of attempting to dig/drill another hole.
 

Stocker Steve

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Stocker Steve":9d7ipkf0 said:
Do you find wood perimeter floating braces are a lot faster, or save one post, or both?

Faster and they save the drudgery of attempting to dig/drill another hole.[/quote]

For a four strand fence, how long of a brace to you prefer?
 

dun

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Stocker Steve":1idv8znp said:
Stocker Steve":1idv8znp said:
Do you find wood perimeter floating braces are a lot faster, or save one post, or both?

Faster and they save the drudgery of attempting to dig/drill another hole.

For a four strand fence, how long of a brace to you prefer?[/quote]
There is some ROT for brace length to fincce height but I just use 12 foot for all of them
 

Phil in Tupelo

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Another issue I have seen with landscape timbers will be bending or even breaking when pressure is applied. The material in landscape posts is not very good since they are not designed to be weight baring. I have seen several that when fence wire was streched tight the brace looked like a quarter or half moon. Can't be good for the strength of the fence.
 

Lucky_P

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Floating Brace Assembly:
http://www.powerflexfence.com/?page_id=513

Here's another variation on the theme - no 'floating', but works fairly well.
http://www.pasturemanagement.com/onepost-brace.htm

A lot of my ends/corners just have a rock set on the back side of the post in the bottom of the hole, and a bedlog or big slab of rock at the top, on the front side of the post. Some shift a bit over the years, but I just jack them back into position and pound another flat rock in between the post and bedlog.
 

dun

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Lucky_P":287ak3s5 said:
Floating Brace Assembly:
http://www.powerflexfence.com/?page_id=513

Here's another variation on the theme - no 'floating', but works fairly well.
http://www.pasturemanagement.com/onepost-brace.htm

A lot of my ends/corners just have a rock set on the back side of the post in the bottom of the hole, and a bedlog or big slab of rock at the top, on the front side of the post. Some shift a bit over the years, but I just jack them back into position and pound another flat rock in between the post and bedlog.
I just don;t notch the post, I use a pin that goes most of the way into the post and sticks into the brace about 4-5 inches. I've used small rebar, bought some pins that are specialiy made for it but 99% of them I use a pice of 1/4 cattle panel that has gotten munged up. Just cut a pice as long as possible and use it. (I'm cheap and prefer using stuff I already have around)
 

Douglas

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I have used the landscape timber for an 8 foot horizontal cross brace. With the rounded side up, it should shed water a last pretty long with no ground contact.
 

krankieone

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For H assemblies I use post a minimum of 6" dia 7' long prefrably 8"-10" and try to make all the cross braces 10' - 12' 41/2" dia I usually use hardwood cut off my property but occasionly buy CCA treated pine.I have occasionlly used floating braces in places that are hard to get posts in I use 3/8" bar to pin braces & knotch the floating ones
 

hillbillycwo

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I just finished fencing my perimeter with 4 strand hi-tensile. I used 8' long by 4" H braces with 6-8 inch diameter posts. The twist wires were high tensile criss crossed top to bottom with a ratchet tightener. It worked well and is plenty strong. To mount the H brace I used 12 " galv. spikes driven through the posts and into the H brace. I did predrill the holes in the posts and braces. This was done to the specs for the ASCS office. I was very satisfied with the result.
 

heath

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Decided to try the floating brace. I've had my fill of wooden corners growing up in SC, so here's mine in pipe.
20120609151322.jpg
 

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