Grazing Corn ?

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BFE

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Interseeding can be a little tricky. First year I did it I planted to early and had too many turnips in the mix.

Not a big radish fan but a few are OK in the mix.
Interseeding, my latest challenge! What have you found that works best for you? Seed, timing (height of corn, won't be interseeding in beans anytime soon), herbicide program?
 

Banjo

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I don't see the advantage of grazing corn unless you have already got it and need to graze it in an emergency situation. Its a one time shot and they will knock a lot of it down. better to have something that will grow back like sorghum sudan or crabgrass. i did it about 10 years ago and had a lot of eye problems in the cows....don't know if it was pinkeye or just lacerations from the leaves... i'm thinking the latter.
if your gonna do it you need to take advantage of whatever else you can get to grow along with it..... I plowed about 10 acres then planted the corn and went thru it once or twice with a cultivator...that stimulated the crabgrass and morning glory and johnsongrass... I may have interseeded some red clover....it worked out good except when your done your done.
 

BFE

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I don't see the advantage of grazing corn unless you have already got it and need to graze it in an emergency situation. Its a one time shot and they will knock a lot of it down. better to have something that will grow back like sorghum sudan or crabgrass. i did it about 10 years ago and had a lot of eye problems in the cows....don't know if it was pinkeye or just lacerations from the leaves... i'm thinking the latter.
if your gonna do it you need to take advantage of whatever else you can get to grow along with it..... I plowed about 10 acres then planted the corn and went thru it once or twice with a cultivator...that stimulated the crabgrass and morning glory and johnsongrass... I may have interseeded some red clover....it worked out good except when your done your done.
Winter stockpile on ground that's not in grass.
 

Buck Randall

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The reason that grazing corn doesn't take off is that it's too wasteful. Chopping and bagging it makes a lot more sense, especially in a year when tonnage is the primary goal.
 

Rydero

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Why do it if it's one and done? What else routinely yields 18-20 ton per acre/per year in the North?

Lots of examples of grazing it without too much waste by moving a temporary electric fence every day/few days. The obstacle to grazing corn becoming mainstream around here seems to be that the producers willing to spend massive dollars per acre on inputs aren't typically the ones that are willing to mess around with moving cattle every day. Also those who justify investing that amount on the crop tend to justify spending more to have it chopped. The guy I work for talks about getting me to move temporary fence on corn ( I have experience swath grazing/moving fence on crops on my own operation) every year and so far in the end it always gets chopped. Something new/will it work?/will he get as much utilization?/will the cows do as well on it? etc.
 
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Stocker Steve

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I don't see the advantage of grazing corn unless you have already got it and need to graze it in an emergency situation. Its a one time shot and they will knock a lot of it down. better to have something that will grow back like sorghum sudan or crabgrass.
1) Grows in the north
2) Drought tolerant
3) Stands up in snow
4) Low er cost per ton when hay is short
5) Builds soil OM
 

Banjo

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Why do it if it's one and done? What else routinely yields 18-20 ton per acre/per year in the North?

Lots of examples of grazing it without too much waste by moving a temporary electric fence every day/few days. The obstacle to grazing corn becoming mainstream around here seems to be that the producers willing to spend massive dollars per acre on inputs aren't typically the ones that are willing to mess around with moving cattle every day. Also those who justify investing that amount on the crop tend to justify spending more to have it chopped. The guy I work for talks about getting me to move temporary fence on corn ( I have experience swath grazing/moving fence on crops on my own operation) every year and so far in the end it always gets chopped. Something new/will it work?/will he get as much utilization?/will the cows do as well on it? etc.
18 ton per acre....I could take 10 acres and feed a 100 cow herd for 6 [email protected] lb. per head per day.
might have to chop it and silage/bag it like Buck said to make it work. IDK
 

Rydero

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18 ton per acre....I could take 10 acres and feed a 100 cow herd for 6 [email protected] lb. per head per day.
might have to chop it and silage/bag it like Buck said to make it work. IDK
Exactly, but might as well make it 500 cows and more acres. Except for the 20lbs/day unless you're feeding something else with or have grazing available too. At my day job we routinely grow corn crops in the 18-20 ton range. We feed about 55lbs total mixed ration/cow/day.
 
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Stocker Steve

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Exactly, but might as well make it 500 cows and more acres. Except for the 20lbs/day unless you're feeding something else with or have grazing available too. At my day job we routinely grow corn crops in the 18-20 ton range. We feed about 55lbs total mixed ration/cow/day.
Do you view a TMR as required, or is there a more cost effective option for 100 cow herds?
 

Rydero

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Do you view a TMR as required, or is there a more cost effective option for 100 cow herds?
I think for 100 cows (or close/my own operation) I'd be looking at grazing it standing and using hay/straw to balance the ration as best I could. Alternative options would be having it chopped and moving a hotwire on the pile (I'm skeptical but can be done) or could be chopped and fed with something as simple as a manure spreader w the beater(s) removed.

Cheap horizontal wagons are often available here for $5000 or small verticals (preferred) $15000...opens a lot of options but the cost of the wagon, inputs for the corn and chopping will escalate everything and next thing you know you have 500 cows and a big wagon to justify it all. Least that's what happens around here.

Seems small operations are stuck in the hay game and the guys who chop go really big. Haven't yet figured out the middle path....
 
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Stocker Steve

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The dairy deal was that you needed corn silage and 100 to 150 cows to make a (new) TMR work. Results may vary. Obviously most cow calf guys don't feed 365 x 2.

I see silage and byproduct as a seasonal fall beef feed. For that I can feed, but not blend, with a $300 chopper box that has the sides cut down for a FEL.

The hay game is getting harder here as small operations and semi retired dairy guys go out. Buying a corn planter may be the next best option.
 

Lee VanRoss

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Bin run or open pollinated corn does not produce an ear on every stalk as hybrid corn does.
For that reason I would not consider it .
 
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Stocker Steve

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The reason that grazing corn doesn't take off is that it's too wasteful. Chopping and bagging it makes a lot more sense, especially in a year when tonnage is the primary goal.
Corn silage harvest and storage and feeding is very very capital intensive, and one reason small dairies have struggled financially. If small diaries can not afford silage then beef cows certainly can not.

Medium diaries have gone to custom harvested corn silage stored in a covered pile. Better, so you can afford the TMR and the tracked skid steer.

The best way to approach corn fodder for beef depends a lot on alternatives and weather. Cheap corn and frozen ground gives strip grazing the nod - - expensive corn and mud gives selling beef cows to some one with fescue the nod.
 
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Buck Randall

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Corn silage harvest and storage and feeding is very very capital intensive, and one reason small dairies have struggled financially. If small diaries can not afford silage then beef cows certainly can not.

Medium diaries have gone to custom harvested corn silage stored in a covered pile. Better, so you can afford the TMR and the tracked skid steer.

The best way to approach corn fodder for beef depends a lot on alternatives and weather. Cheap corn and frozen ground gives strip grazing the nod - - expensive corn and mud gives selling beef cows to some one with fescue the nod.
Corn silage is capital intensive, but the superior yield and feed quality more than pays for it. Using a custom harvester and putting it in a bag makes sense of most small producers. TMR is nice, but not necessary.

For what tillable land is worth in the upper midwest, it doesn't make financial sense to try to run a low input operation.
 

BC

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I saw grazing corn used to grow yearling calves from weaning to feedlot ready size in Kentucky when I was on a tour. It was no-tilled into some ground that was too hill to plow and run a combine. I do not remember then figures, but the producer said it worked for them.
 
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Stocker Steve

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I saw grazing corn used to grow yearling calves from weaning to feedlot ready size in Kentucky when I was on a tour. It was no-tilled into some ground that was too hill to plow and run a combine. I do not remember then figures, but the producer said it worked for them.
There has been some publicity on this. Low input and low production, but the forage is available at the right time.
 

Banjo

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Bin run or open pollinated corn does not produce an ear on every stalk as hybrid corn does.
For that reason I would not consider it .
Bin run corn and open pollinated corn is two different things....if your bin run corn is round up ready corn at probably 6 to 8 percent protein and OP at 12 to 13% protein.
 
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