Grass Fed.....

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2barmcattle

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I noticed an advertisement for a grass fed beef producer that said that they can make the meat taste better by feeding different types of forage. Can you? and how do you know what type produces what outcome?

Thanks,
 

brandonm_13

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I have a book called Grassfed to finish. It's expensive(about $30 for a paperback), but it goes into detail about different grasses. From what I understand, the best grasses to finish cattle on are annual ryegrass, corn(not the grain), and most cereal grains(although wheat supposedly has a taste to it). Those are supposed to make it taste like it was cornfed. Some weeds cause it to have a bad taste, as does fescue, and some other grasses.
 

Jogeephus

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brandonm_13":kz6nqqg0 said:
I have a book called Grassfed to finish. It's expensive(about $30 for a paperback), but it goes into detail about different grasses. From what I understand, the best grasses to finish cattle on are annual ryegrass, corn(not the grain), and most cereal grains(although wheat supposedly has a taste to it). Those are supposed to make it taste like it was cornfed. Some weeds cause it to have a bad taste, as does fescue, and some other grasses.

I read that book too. Good read BTW. I could just see them coming to get me if I intentionally turned cattle onto a corn field before it had time to make. Just ain't right. Ain't natural. Easiest and cheapest way to make em taste like corn fed cattle is to .... well... you know. :lol2:
 

lavacarancher

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brandonm_13":2ysgu99k said:
I have a book called Grassfed to finish. It's expensive(about $30 for a paperback), but it goes into detail about different grasses. From what I understand, the best grasses to finish cattle on are annual ryegrass, corn(not the grain), and most cereal grains(although wheat supposedly has a taste to it). Those are supposed to make it taste like it was cornfed. Some weeds cause it to have a bad taste, as does fescue, and some other grasses.

Just my luck. I buy fescue hay and now you tell me it will make the meat taste bad. :lol: Oh well, probably not gonna eat what I have left anyway.
 

Jogeephus

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2barmcattle":2eiqonhu said:
I'm on mostly native so....we'll see what we get. Thanks for the advice. :tiphat: :tiphat: :tiphat:

Its been a while since I read the book but if I remember correctly on native grasses the timing of the year will be important.
 
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2barmcattle

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Jogeephus":3i3ft0h1 said:
2barmcattle":3i3ft0h1 said:
I'm on mostly native so....we'll see what we get. Thanks for the advice. :tiphat: :tiphat: :tiphat:

Its been a while since I read the book but if I remember correctly on native grasses the timing of the year will be important.

Taking to processor Oct 26th. I hope that is a good time. I'll have to look up that book. Thanks!!! :tiphat:
 

Jogeephus

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If memory serves me correctly Nation stated that the reason we went to the feed yard system was to insure a steady supply of meat since the best grass finished beef would put most of the cattle on the market in the spring when most grasses were at their highest nutrient levels and this was problematic. Of course with certain annual plantings this could be shifted to various times of the year depending on what you grow.
 

brandonm_13

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You're right Jo. I think he said with most cool-season perennials, we would have most all of our beef harvested in spring and while restaurants and stores could handle seasonal buffalo and other novelties, it wanted beef year round. Of course with winter and summer annuals, you should be able to finish cattle 9-10 months out of the year.
 

grannysoo

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Jogeephus":348fz1nh said:
Nation stated that the reason we went to the feed yard system was to insure a steady supply of meat

Exactly. Wally-World does not want a steady supply for 10 months out of the year, they want steady for 12 months. So do all of the other retailers.

Steady, just in time inventory to sell.
 

edrsimms

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2barmcattle":3a6tpl7b said:
I noticed an advertisement for a grass fed beef producer that said that they can make the meat taste better by feeding different types of forage. Can you? and how do you know what type produces what outcome?

Thanks,

This is a very good subject.

Meat from grass-fed animals is lower in fat than meat from grain-fed animals, it is also lower in calories.

If you eat a typical amount of beef (66.5 pounds a year), switching to lean grassfed beef will save you 17,733 calories a year—without requiring any willpower or change in your eating habits.

If all Americans switched to grassfed meat, our national epidemic of obesity might diminish.


In the past few years, producers of grass-fed beef have been looking for ways to increase the amount of marbling in the meat so that consumers will have a more familiar product. But even these fatter cuts of grass-fed beef are lower in fat and calories than beef from grain-fed cattle.

********************Extra Omega-3s. Meat from grass-fed animals has two to four times more omega-3 fatty acids than meat from grain- fed animals.

Omega-3s are called "good fats" because they play a vital role in every cell and system in your body.
For example, of all the fats, they are the most heart-friendly.
People who have ample amounts of omega-3s in their diet are less likely to have high blood pressure or an irregular heartbeat.
50 percent less likely to suffer a heart attack.
Omega-3s are essential for your brain as well.
People with a diet rich in omega-3s are less likely to suffer from depression, schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder (hyperactivity), or Alzheimer's disease.

Another benefit of omega-3s is that they may reduce your risk of cancer. In animal studies, these essential fats have slowed the growth of a wide array of cancers and also kept them from spreading.

Omega-3s are most abundant in seafood and certain nuts and seeds such as flaxseeds and walnuts, but they are also found in animals raised on pasture. The reason is simple. Omega-3s are formed in the chloroplasts of green leaves and algae. Sixty percent of the fatty acids in grass are omega-3s.

When cattle are taken off omega-3 rich grass and shipped to a feedlot to be fattened on omega-3 poor grain, they begin losing their store of this beneficial fat. Each day that an animal spends in the feedlot, its supply of omega-3s is diminished.

It has been estimated that only 40 percent of Americans consume an adequate supply of omega-3 fatty acids. Twenty percent have blood levels so low that they cannot be detected. Switching to the meat, milk, and dairy products of grass-fed animals is one way to restore this vital nutrient to your diet.

The CLA Bonus. Meat and dairy products from grass-fed ruminants are the richest known source of another type of good fat called "conjugated linoleic acid" or CLA. When ruminants are raised on fresh pasture alone, their products contain from three to five times more CLA than products from animals fed conventional diets. (A steak from the most marbled grass-fed animals will have the most CLA ,as much of the CLA is stored in fat cells.)

Score Ten for Grass-Fed Beef
Grass-fed beef is better for human health than grain-fed beef in ten different ways, according to the most comprehensive analysis to date. The 2009 study was a joint effort between the USDA and researchers at Clemson University in South Carolina. Compared with grain-fed beef, grass-fed beef was:

Lower in total fat
Higher in beta-carotene
Higher in vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)
Higher in the B-vitamins thiamin and riboflavin
Higher in the minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium
Higher in total omega-3s
A healthier ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids (1.65 vs 4.84)
Higher in CLA (cis-9 trans-11), a potential cancer fighter
Higher in vaccenic acid (which can be transformed into CLA)
Lower in the saturated fats linked with heart disease
 

dieselbeef

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i would like to use this in my advertisement..is the source avail and do i have yer permission to reprint it?
i have handouts i give with my meat and id love to hand this info out with it also.
thanks
gary
 

edrsimms

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dieselbeef":lbu5lnh7 said:
i would like to use this in my advertisement..is the source avail and do i have yer permission to reprint it?
i have handouts i give with my meat and id love to hand this info out with it also.
thanks
gary


As you wish, Gary

THE SOURCE : http://www.eatwild.com/healthbenefits.htm

Ed
 

dieselbeef

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Jogeephus":et4ebo69 said:
dieselbeef":et4ebo69 said:
thanks..that makes the meat look even better...

Spend some time at the site and read on. You can donate some money to "their cause" as well.

donate moneys...ummm..yeah.thanks for the tip tho jo...wheres the smiley of a kick in the nuts for ya??
 
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