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Carrie

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Happy Friday Everyone,
I keep seeing the term F1 on the board. You guys will probably think I just fell off the turnip truck, but what does this mean? :oops:

Humbly yours,
 

txag

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Carrie":1c8fkb7p said:
Happy Friday Everyone,
I keep seeing the term F1 on the board. You guys will probably think I just fell off the turnip truck, but what does this mean? :oops:

Humbly yours,

an F1 is the first generation cross between two different breeds.

example: angus x hereford = F1 hereford/angus

typically in our area the term "F1" refers to a brahman/hereford cross.
 

cherokeeruby

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It is the first generation cross between two species or in the case of cattle two breeds. The term F1 derives from Family 1.

Bos Indicus - Brahman, Zebu, etc

X

Bos Tarus - Hereford, Continental, etc

= F1

It is also claimed that a cross of Bos Tarus, Hereford and Bos Tarus, Angus produce an F1. There is some hybrid vigor but not as much as a cross between species.

Mules are F1 horse x jackass, very vigorous, long lived, etc. Just not fertile. F1 Bos Indicus x Box Tarus are all the above and very fertile.
 

txag

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jfont":3fhz1gpa said:
Those are good explanations, but I wanted to add, that to my understanding the two breeds have to be registered.

nope. F1 has nothing to do with being registered. it's a genetic term that can be applied to plants as well as animals. Mendel first used it in his experiments with peas.
 

jfont

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txag":2rhpz2dv said:
jfont":2rhpz2dv said:
Those are good explanations, but I wanted to add, that to my understanding the two breeds have to be registered.

nope. F1 has nothing to do with being registered. it's a genetic term that can be applied to plants as well as animals. Mendel first used it in his experiments with peas.
maybe so, but I don't see how you can call it an F-1 unless you know the parents are pure.
 

txag

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jfont":1eow2d8w said:
maybe so, but I don't see how you can call it an F-1 unless you know the parents are pure.

because there are lots of pure animals that aren't registered. for example.........lots of unregistered hereford cows are crossed with brahman bulls to produce tigers & vice versa.
 

cherokeeruby

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The association offers a Certified and Golden Certified F1 program. In the Certified program, the dam is a qualified purebred cow and the sire is registered. In the Golden Certified program, both the dam and sire are registered.

These are the rules of the American Brahman Breeders Association. The purebred cows are visually inspected

http://www.landandlivestockpost.com/liv ... eldday.htm
 

txshowmom

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The association offers a Certified and Golden Certified F1 program. In the Certified program, the dam is a qualified purebred cow and the sire is registered. In the Golden Certified program, both the dam and sire are registered.

These are the rules of the American Brahman Breeders Association. The purebred cows are visually inspected

You beat me to it I was just going to say the exact same thing.
 

txag

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txshowmom":3usieaau said:
The association offers a Certified and Golden Certified F1 program. In the Certified program, the dam is a qualified purebred cow and the sire is registered. In the Golden Certified program, both the dam and sire are registered.

These are the rules of the American Brahman Breeders Association. The purebred cows are visually inspected

You beat me to it I was just going to say the exact same thing.

both of you are referring to what are typically called "F1's" in Texas and in the south. up north, if you mentioned F1, they'd probably be more likely to think of a hereford/angus.

remember that any cross (not just hereford & brahman) of two different breeds is an F1.

jfont,

your remark about pure & registered got me thinking........does being registered make an animal pure? some breeds allow animals to be registered with as little as 50%. registering is not always a sign of being pure.
 

txshowmom

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Not in the Brahman and Angus breed (I am sure there are more) Anything that is registered MUST be 100% and both parents must be registered.[/quote]
 

txag

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txshowmom":1ybtf5h0 said:
Not in the Brahman and Angus breed (I am sure there are more) Anything that is registered MUST be 100% and both parents must be registered.

i said some breeds (examples Maine, Shorthorn, Limi, Simi).

herefords also have to be 100% & both parents registered.

but still remember that hereford/brahmans are not the only F1's.
 

txag

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txshowmom":3cotm9wx said:
Brahman Herford cross.

so Brahman Angus cross isn't an F1?

maybe you need a genetics lesson. F1 is the first generation produced by the parental generation.

a Hereford Jersey cross is an F1.
an Angus Holstein cross is an F1.
a Limousin Simmental cross is an F1
a Brahman Holstein cross is an F1.
get the picture?

yes, here in Texas if you see an ad in the paper offering F1's for sale, they are more than likely referring to a Brahman Hereford but that is NOT the only F1.
 

cherokeeruby

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In the genetic sense only a cross between species would be a true F-1. Since Angus and Hereford are both Bos Tarus they would be a cross but not an F-1.
 

txag

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not necessarily:

"To help with record keeping, generations were labeled and numbered. The parental generation is denoted as the P1 generation. The offspring of the P1 generation are the F1 generation (first filial). The self-fertilizing F1 generation produced the F2 generation (second filial)."

here's a link to the intro to genetics article:

http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/far ... intro.html
 

jfont

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I think the answers are getting a little too technical.
Speaking of cows and not peas.
If a man is selling me an F-1 brangus, I expect that to be the first cross between a brahman and an angus.
If I'm buying an F-1 braford I expect that to be the first cross between a brahman and a herford.
If that can't be established all you are buying is F-1 summa cows. (some of this, and some of that) and I call that mixed bred.
 

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