Good year to retain heifers

Help Support CattleToday:

One thing we look at if we retain for a replacement and not increasing the herd, is the value of the cow that will be culled. We figure she is replacing one calf even though it may be the next year.
 
1982vett":tqqf0rjr said:
Caustic Burno":tqqf0rjr said:
It really pretty simple the dam has stood in your pasture for two years not returning anything to the bottom line.
At 205 days the retained heifer is another added cost until she calves. You are now paying the cost to retain two cows . The heifer has 648 days after weaning at a cost before returning anything to the bottom line.
You have kept two cows for two years that contributed nothing to the cost of the operation.
You have also retained a heifer that has no value in the event of loss.

True that nothing was added the the bank account. But now you have 4 animals to sell instead of 2. The dam and her second calf, her first calf and her first calf's calf. Still pretty tight to actually adding anything to the bank account.

By my thinking the operation lost two calves to sell retaining a heifer. Had I sold the first heifer is income and repalced her with a heavy, that will calf in 60 days is income as well. Now the dam will calf again in twelve months as will the purchased heavy( that can be depreciated or written off in the event of loss) which is protection from loss that a retained heifer doesn't have. I have also reduced the O Crap factor of calving first time heifers.
 
Somebody has got to keep and raise heifers or we would all be out of business. CB would not have them heavys to buy if some of us don't raise heifers.
 
Like I said before, I cannot justify going out and buying 6 or 7 "heavies" right now, which would cost me around $8000-10K. I keep back my best heifers and still do alot better in the long run.
I am not saying I have not bought some 3 or 4 year old bred cows, because I have. But I did it to improve the quality of my herd (registered full-bloods). And those are the heifers I am keeping back this year, along with a few of my very best cross heifers.
 
Red Bull Breeder":n2qah3rc said:
Somebody has got to keep and raise heifers or we would all be out of business. CB would not have them heavys to buy if some of us don't raise heifers.

Never said there was anything wrong with retaining heifers just know they come at a high cost, there are no free tickets. I choose not to pay that cost when I can readly buy productive cow's such as heavies or 3 n 1's for the same money. I can choose to invest in a cow that knows how to work or gamble on one. With today's input cost versus output, this has to be one of the worse times to retain anything not producing a calf every 12 months.
 
CB
The next time you need some of those Funnel Butt, Short Legs, and Black Hiefers give me a call. I sure like the calving ease. Good to hear from you on the boards. Hope to hear more. Got all your fences fixed to hold those hiefers.
 
i put the pencel to it last year.an i came up with a cost of $1700 a hd.now my cost figures have prolly gone up this year.but i havent figured it.i have 2 heifers that i can keep or sell.if i sale them i could make $1700.an then buy 1 cow outright.
 
bigbull338":2gkd7iei said:
i put the pencel to it last year.an i came up with a cost of $1700 a hd.now my cost figures have prolly gone up this year.but i havent figured it.i have 2 heifers that i can keep or sell.if i sale them i could make $1700.an then buy 1 cow outright.

Sell two heifers and make $1700?? Are these registered heifers, or what?
 
Limomike":11i7dlw5 said:
bigbull338":11i7dlw5 said:
i put the pencel to it last year.an i came up with a cost of $1700 a hd.now my cost figures have prolly gone up this year.but i havent figured it.i have 2 heifers that i can keep or sell.if i sale them i could make $1700.an then buy 1 cow outright.

Sell two heifers and make $1700?? Are these registered heifers, or what?

If you can get $850/hfr, I gotta look for work.
 
yes they are reg heifers right off the cow for $850ea.the heifers are where i make my money.
 
WHAT stockyard is selling weaned heifers for the same price as 3 n 1s right now????

A 1200 lb cow brings 50 cents a lb ($600) for slaughter. If you are buying pairs they are NOT heavy bred, as any yard I am familiar with splits off anything over 220 lbs and lets them sell by the pound. The best you can get is a cow 1-3 months bred with a calf at side and that is usually a guess since pairs aren't often preg checked for this very reason. 550 lb Heifers are only bringing $.82 ($451). Your cost of keeping a heifer is what you passed up by not selling her with the other calves (at the moment ~$451) plus the cost of raising her to calving. If your expenses for keeping an animal are $30 per month per head ($360 a year): then after 18 months of growing out time plus the sale price you elected not to accept you have $991 invested in each heifer you raised yourself. Now in buying cows on the other hand, most sales you can pull out 6-7 mos bred cows for $600 -700. Take the lower number and add in 60 days of growing out time to get the calf born (at $30 per hd per mon) and you only have $660 invested. $991 versus $660 makes buying your cows look attractive. The other side of that is that heifer has her whole life ahead of her. She is going to take me to the pay window at least 11 times, so that cost of development is only $90 per calf per year and I will get $600 when I sell her to you as a heavy through the sale, cutting my costs of heifer development down to $35.55 per calf. On the other hand, those sale barn heavies MIGHT have four calves left in them (on average) so the cost of purchasing that cow spread out over those 4 calves is $165 a head. Subtract out the salvage value of the cow. If she is selling as an open canner she probably is 200 lbs lighter this time and only bring 38 cents ($380). Her net cost spread out amoung the four calves comes out to $70 per calf. In THIS market with high kill cow prices and LOW heifer prices my math favors growing out the heifers -$35.55 to -$70. Now 3 years ago when every heifer was bringing $1.30++ a pound the numbers were reverse.

We also need to consider that the raised heifers (theoretically) come out of our best cow families and out of that good bull we paid $2000 to 3000++ for and we know her genetic makeup. She is also out of our herd where we know what shots she had and she won't be bringing BVD type II, trich, vibrio, or the latest viral cold she picked up at the stockyard with her. When you buy one through the stockyard, you don't know her sire's EPDs, her health history, her production history, etc. All you know is that somebody else had her and they CULLED her.
 
yes i can a do sell weaned reg heifer calves off the cow for $850ea double what stock heifers are worth.210 days to breeding age is 1700lbs of feed.feed cost is $13/100 for $221 hay 150 days 1.5 rd bales $45.misc expenses $55 a hd. another 12 month wait for the calf us same figures $650 pre heifer till calf is born thats $1550 a hd for a bred heifer.an if you add the year to wean calf an breed back $2100.i can take the $2100 an buy a top end 3 in 1 pair.
 
Brandonm22":1ghmx5aj said:
WHAT stockyard is selling weaned heifers for the same price as 3 n 1s right now????

A 1200 lb cow brings 50 cents a lb ($600) for slaughter. If you are buying pairs they are NOT heavy bred, as any yard I am familiar with splits off anything over 220 lbs and lets them sell by the pound. The best you can get is a cow 1-3 months bred with a calf at side and that is usually a guess since pairs aren't often preg checked for this very reason. 550 lb Heifers are only bringing $.82 ($451). Your cost of keeping a heifer is what you passed up by not selling her with the other calves (at the moment ~$451) plus the cost of raising her to calving. If your expenses for keeping an animal are $30 per month per head ($360 a year): then after 18 months of growing out time plus the sale price you elected not to accept you have $991 invested in each heifer you raised yourself. Now in buying cows on the other hand, most sales you can pull out 6-7 mos bred cows for $600 -700. Take the lower number and add in 60 days of growing out time to get the calf born (at $30 per hd per mon) and you only have $660 invested. $991 versus $660 makes buying your cows look attractive. The other side of that is that heifer has her whole life ahead of her. She is going to take me to the pay window at least 11 times, so that cost of development is only $90 per calf per year and I will get $600 when I sell her to you as a heavy through the sale, cutting my costs of heifer development down to $35.55 per calf. On the other hand, those sale barn heavies MIGHT have four calves left in them (on average) so the cost of purchasing that cow spread out over those 4 calves is $165 a head. Subtract out the salvage value of the cow. If she is selling as an open canner she probably is 200 lbs lighter this time and only bring 38 cents ($380). Her net cost spread out amoung the four calves comes out to $70 per calf. In THIS market with high kill cow prices and LOW heifer prices my math favors growing out the heifers -$35.55 to -$70. Now 3 years ago when every heifer was bringing $1.30++ a pound the numbers were reverse.

Very informative. :tiphat:

We also need to consider that the raised heifers (theoretically) come out of our best cow families and out of that good bull we paid $2000 to 3000++ for and we know her genetic makeup. She is also out of our herd where we know what shots she had and she won't be bringing BVD type II, trich, vibrio, or the latest viral cold she picked up at the stockyard with her. When you buy one through the stockyard, you don't know her sire's EPDs, her health history, her production history, etc. All you know is that somebody else had her and they CULLED her.


:nod: :tiphat:
 
Every year is a good year to retain heifers. :D

Lots of people will be keeping more I believe. Alot of people with early calves this year that they WERE going to sell this fall are keeping them until Spring. By that time they will almost be ready, might as well pick out the nice ones.
 
Brandonm22":1k7l16vx said:
WHAT stockyard is selling weaned heifers for the same price as 3 n 1s right now????

A 1200 lb cow brings 50 cents a lb ($600) for slaughter. If you are buying pairs they are NOT heavy bred, as any yard I am familiar with splits off anything over 220 lbs and lets them sell by the pound. The best you can get is a cow 1-3 months bred with a calf at side and that is usually a guess since pairs aren't often preg checked for this very reason. 550 lb Heifers are only bringing $.82 ($451). Your cost of keeping a heifer is what you passed up by not selling her with the other calves (at the moment ~$451) plus the cost of raising her to calving. If your expenses for keeping an animal are $30 per month per head ($360 a year): then after 18 months of growing out time plus the sale price you elected not to accept you have $991 invested in each heifer you raised yourself. Now in buying cows on the other hand, most sales you can pull out 6-7 mos bred cows for $600 -700. Take the lower number and add in 60 days of growing out time to get the calf born (at $30 per hd per mon) and you only have $660 invested. $991 versus $660 makes buying your cows look attractive. The other side of that is that heifer has her whole life ahead of her. She is going to take me to the pay window at least 11 times, so that cost of development is only $90 per calf per year and I will get $600 when I sell her to you as a heavy through the sale, cutting my costs of heifer development down to $35.55 per calf. On the other hand, those sale barn heavies MIGHT have four calves left in them (on average) so the cost of purchasing that cow spread out over those 4 calves is $165 a head. Subtract out the salvage value of the cow. If she is selling as an open canner she probably is 200 lbs lighter this time and only bring 38 cents ($380). Her net cost spread out amoung the four calves comes out to $70 per calf. In THIS market with high kill cow prices and LOW heifer prices my math favors growing out the heifers -$35.55 to -$70. Now 3 years ago when every heifer was bringing $1.30++ a pound the numbers were reverse.

We also need to consider that the raised heifers (theoretically) come out of our best cow families and out of that good bull we paid $2000 to 3000++ for and we know her genetic makeup. She is also out of our herd where we know what shots she had and she won't be bringing BVD type II, trich, vibrio, or the latest viral cold she picked up at the stockyard with her. When you buy one through the stockyard, you don't know her sire's EPDs, her health history, her production history, etc. All you know is that somebody else had her and they CULLED her.

You must have found a new meth connection. :mrgreen:
 
Brandonm22":vfwr4j10 said:
HerefordSire":vfwr4j10 said:
You must have found a new meth connection. :mrgreen:

If you got different numbers we are all listening!

Meth was used to describe accurate, detailed, and fast. If I wanted to make a contrary point, I would have used the word pot. :mrgreen:
 
Sorry Herf, you confused me with that response. I am not as knowledgable about mind altering chemical substances as some folks.
 

Latest posts

Top