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Giving shots ?

tncattle

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The man I've worked with for three years gives his vaccine and any other shots with simple syringe & needle. It has always seemed to me kind of risky cause they don't all stand still as we all know when they are in the headgate & chute. Anyway, what are some other tools that y'all use or is this pretty much the only way?
 

milkmaid

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Kind of risky in regards to what?

If they're not going to hold still, the chute is the best place for them and safest place for me.
 

tncattle

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Let me be more specific, even when they are in the headgate they can jump & buck and throw a fit. I was just wondering what other ways besides needle & syringe are used? Aren't there vaccine guns or something to keep from getting a needle stuck in your hand or finger that's loaded full of LA 200? I'd rather not have that junk flowing through my veins if I can help it.
 

cattlepower

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Yeah your right but not everyone has or can afford expensive squeeze chutes. I know what he means, the gun type shot giver can be handled better than just a simple needle and syringe.
 

milkmaid

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cattlepower":3c9qyieb said:
Yeah your right but not everyone has or can afford expensive squeeze chutes. I know what he means, the gun type shot giver can be handled better than just a simple needle and syringe.

It's also more dangerous -- the simple syringe and needle may just get stuck in your finger, but the automatic syringe might be stuck in your finger AND get injected.
 

TheBullLady

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If they're able to jump around in the chute enough for you to risk sticking yourself with a needle, you don't have them restrained enough! I've bent a needle on occassion, but can't remember ever coming close to stabbing myself. Well, not with a needle anyway.
 

novatech

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Patience
Learn to work your cattle calmly. No hooting and hollering, whips, hotshots, etc. Educate your cattle. Put them through the chute when they do not need to be worked. This shows them they will not be hurt. The education should start when they are calves.
Rough cattle work better with a chute that has solid sides. Work above them off a cat walk on the side.
I have a squeeze chute. I rarely use it. More of a pain when working alone than anything else. About the only thing I use it for is working on the head or udder.
 

jkwilson

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My opinion on this, and we all know what opinions are like, is that if you don't have chute that will handle your cattle, you shouldn't have the cattle.

I did without one for several years, so I formed this opinion from the school of hard knocks. You don't do the things you need to do as far as treatment and vaccines, and the likelihood of cattle or you getting hurt is much higher. I was always tempted to over-medicate the animal to avoid having to go through the rodeo again.

Working cows USED to be a manure slinging, cussing, kicking rodeo that ended up with the cows scared, me bruised, mad and dirty. Now I can take a drink of coffee between cows. Every time I work them I call myself an idiot for not getting a chute years earlier.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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We also do it the old fashion way :shock: needle & syringe. Worked over 40 head thru chute yesterday & neither one of us got "stuck".
Sure, an occasional one will act up, but just take your time. As mentioned, you don't want to start off by getting them riled up. Cattle should be handled quietly and they usually will stay quiet.
 

backhoeboogie

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Giving one a shot with a needle is a piece of cake.

Surgerical procedures are what concern me - even someting as simple as castration in a chute is much more dangerous than an injection.
 

Aaron

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The Allflex automatic syringe gun is a great tool. Only used for intramuscular shots. Subcutaneous shots are always dangerous with a jittery animal. But I use auto syringes for the intramuscular stuff as they are quick and easy to use and don't break like some plastic syringe tips will in a thick hide. :cowboy:
 

msscamp

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tncattle":374iktnd said:
Aren't there vaccine guns or something to keep from getting a needle stuck in your hand or finger that's loaded full of LA 200?

Regardless of what you use, a needle is generally necessary, so I would suggest you learn how to give a shot without having to tent the skin. It is fairly difficult to get stuck if your hands are not within needle range.
 

Bez+

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Aaron":1b23l58s said:
The Allflex automatic syringe gun is a great tool. Only used for intramuscular shots. Subcutaneous shots are always dangerous with a jittery animal. But I use auto syringes for the intramuscular stuff as they are quick and easy to use and don't break like some plastic syringe tips will in a thick hide. :cowboy:

I do not agree with sub Q comment Aaron - but perhaps it is because I use the following method.

I do a lot of sub Q and this is how I do it - I NEVER tent with the second hand. All sub Q shots are administered one handed. I discarded the tenting method years ago. Dangerous and slow - in my opinion.

1. Hold the syringe in your fist like you would hold a knife and are about to stab with it.

2. Place your thumb over the plunger

3. Hold the syringe parallel to the location of the injection site on the neck - needle pointing down.

4. Using a very slight angle - bring the top of the syringe back just slightly towards you and quickly insert the needle into the injection site in one smooth downward motion.

5. The needle will enter the animal and slide under the skin and still not hit the meat. I never use a needle longer than 3/4 of an inch - never had reason to.

6. Push the plunger with your thumb and then remove the needle.

If you are nervous - and some people are - slap (not punch) the site several times hard and fast with your free hand and then insert the needle and inject. The stinging sensation from the slap deadens the feel of the injection. This also helps with jumpy cattle. I usually do it with the back of my left hand and then hit them with the needle in my right hand.

You have just completed a successful one handed sub Q injection. Never put more than 10 CC per site.

I hear all sorts of comments about lumps after injections. I can honestly state I have never experienced this.

Is it because of my injection method? I do not know - but the guy who showed me swears it is.

I can bang off a lot of injections - real fast using this method - put one animal in the squeeze and pack a bunch in tight in the chute behind the squeeze and off I go. I can hit them all faster than you can supply me with the needles and the cows seldom jump around because they do not feel the needle going in.

Cheers

Bez+
 

Bez+

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msscamp":2fbeu0sd said:
tncattle":2fbeu0sd said:
Aren't there vaccine guns or something to keep from getting a needle stuck in your hand or finger that's loaded full of LA 200?

Regardless of what you use, a needle is generally necessary, so I would suggest you learn how to give a shot without having to tent the skin. It is fairly difficult to get stuck if your hands are not within needle range.

I wrote my response before reading your response. :D

I could not agree more

Bez+
 

milkmaid

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Bez -- I read your post on giving SQ injections several years ago and I've done it that way ever since. Definitely the best way to do it.
 

backhoeboogie

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That method is not exactly how I do it, but I'm going to give it a try. Especially the slapping part on a couple of high strung cows I know :D
 

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