getting first calf heifers re-bred

Help Support CattleToday:

redangus

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 8, 2004
Messages
347
Reaction score
0
Location
Arkansas
I've got 9 red angus heifers bred to LSF Combination that are to calve in January-February. They are very nice heifers, but I've got them running with 3,4, and 5 year old cows. How can I assure that the heifers get the needed supplement they need after calving to ensure that they get bred back in a timely manner?

Would you reccomend mixing salt and corn 50/50 and feeding free choice so the older cows do not over consume? I don't have a good way to separate the younger from the older animals. Is this free choice a good idea?
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
redangus":34ez4vil said:
I've got 9 red angus heifers bred to LSF Combination that are to calve in January-February. They are very nice heifers, but I've got them running with 3,4, and 5 year old cows. How can I assure that the heifers get the needed supplement they need after calving to ensure that they get bred back in a timely manner?

Would you reccomend mixing salt and corn 50/50 and feeding free choice so the older cows do not over consume? I don't have a good way to separate the younger from the older animals. Is this free choice a good idea?

We calve in Feb-March (fighting MA Nature) and rebreed in Late may and into June so our feed program is pretty well spelled out by the quality of the grass. We've never had problems getting first calf cows to rebreed, and even though they are sometimes the last to calve as heifers they're among the first to calve with their second calf. We run all the cows and heifers together all the time. If you manage for the condition of the poorest/youngest, you'll waste some feed on the older cows. If you manage for the older cows that don't need as much energy/protein the younger ones may suffer. Free choice isn't a good option because the older and piggiest cows will dominate the feed. We've never had much luck using salt as a limiter. If on poor grass, a supplement tub or tank would probably work out the best. Granted, your older cows don't need it, but it's better that they get a little fat then to have the younger girls come up open.
If your breeding window is slipping by and they haven't started to cycle you can use a synch protcol to get them bred.

dun
 

Larry Sansom

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 13, 2004
Messages
160
Reaction score
0
Location
Hartford KY
redangus":22uikkrb said:
I've got 9 red angus heifers bred to LSF Combination that are to calve in January-February. They are very nice heifers, but I've got them running with 3,4, and 5 year old cows. How can I assure that the heifers get the needed supplement they need after calving to ensure that they get bred back in a timely manner?

Would you reccomend mixing salt and corn 50/50 and feeding free choice so the older cows do not over consume? I don't have a good way to separate the younger from the older animals. Is this free choice a good idea?
Be concerned about the body condition of the heifers 30-45 days PRIOR to calving. That makes all the difference. Research shows that if they are "flushed" before calving - you can loose some weight and still re-breed. - But the game of playing catch-up by feeding after calving will give you much poorer results and even with a big feed bill, you will not get the same % bred if you just get them flushed as well as possible that last 30 days prior to calving. - Like said above - salt is a very poor limiter and the rations like Purina's Accuration limiting ration is also poor choice. Best is to hand feed just Corn - they will likely have enough protein in the hay/ roughage - but energy is generally the limiting factor.
 

Michelle Pankonien

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 4, 2004
Messages
174
Reaction score
0
Location
College Station, TX
Hello,

We calve our heifers at 24 monthes give or take a few days, I believe and maintenance rate of gain during the last trimester of gestation is the best plan, then I suppliment them with a 16% protein 8% fat, how I get this done, is I get a 14% calf creep pellet with OUT salt limiter, then add 3% Fat as soy bean oil, it works out to $8.50 per 100wt, the ration tests out at 16%protein, 8% fat,

Fat goes directly to the cow as an energy source, the protein goes into milk production. with protein supplimentation, they willv do fine on OK forrage, serving as a bulk fiber diet.

The rate I feed is about 6-8 lb per head per day, fed once daily at a bulk feeder.

The key to raising good quality heifers, and getting quality calves the first time out, is providing the female who is still growing herself the energy required to grow, raise her calf and become reproductive again within a 45-60 day window post partum, as well as providing a good quality loose mineral free choice, NOT a salt block or salt meal

Cattle can get toxic and have there blood all out of whack from consuming too much salt, and if they are protein defficient they will consume too much salt trying to eat enough protein, and get even more out of ballance chemicaly
 

Devin

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2004
Messages
120
Reaction score
0
We put the a bull in with the heifers about 30 days before we turn the bull out with the main herd. This gets them calved out a little early most of the time and gives them some time to recover. We have had great luck with that for years. I would recommend trying to find a place if at all possible to seperate them before calving. We spent a little money on some fence in a small area near our working pen. It makes them easy to check at night (you don't have to ride over the whole place) and you can feed them supplemental feed without feeding the entire herd(unless you feed the entire herd anyway). This was a good investment for us as we retain some heifers every year. Don't know if I would do it if it were a one time thing. Just my two cents. Good luck!
 

Latest posts

Top