GeneSTAR tests

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Would DNA testing for marbling and tenderness influence your bull purchase?

  • Yes, gives me the edge on future carcass merits.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yes, but not the deciding factor.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No, doesn't make a difference

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Can they test for gene carriers?

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Texan

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Cattle_gal, I voted no. It won't have any influence for me in the near future, but it should! That is, assuming its reliable.

If DNA is a reliable predictor of tenderness, we should all try to take advantage of it. If we want to improve demand for beef, being able to guarantee the consumer a tender steak every time would be a great improvement over some of the hit and miss experiences they have now.
 

certherfbeef

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I don't know enough about this program to make an educated comment here. Can you post some links for me so I can study up.
 

paul swisher

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You can see some information on DNA Tenderness testing on my web page here at CattleToday - Web Pages - Circle Red S. Also check GeneSTAR http://www.bovigensolutions.com and TenderGENE http://www.igenity.com
DNA testing is just another tool for breeders to use. No single trait should take priority but when you put them all together one may make the difference. We only use 2 star bulls but if they can't cut it for all other factors they're gone.
 

greatgerts

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See, I want the info., but at the same time, I have done a few bulls, and they have trouble reading the samples. Hopefully they can fix that soon.
 

greenwillowherefords

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There are a couple of articles I have read on this subject and I need to dig them out and reread them. As I remember and understand it, eighty percent of English breeds have it, and around 30 percent of many other breeds, including continental. However, there are enough in most breeds, in my opinion, to make improvements with a concentrated breeding program. The English breeds would just have a greater percentage of animals to choose from, which would make it easier to select for multiple traits.
 

paul swisher

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A little more information on DNA testing. Using a simple not evasive (15 to 20 Tail hairs or straw of semen) certain traits can be identified. Tenderness is the one I have been involved with. Basically there are two enzymes that affect tenderness - Calpastatin and Calpain. Calpastatin inhibits the natural tenderization that occurs during aging and Calpain enhances it. GeneSTAR(Bovigen) test for both. TenderGENE(Igenity) test for 2 different SNP of Calpain. Seperate testing using Bratzler Shear test has verified DNA testing. Just as some breeds grow larger, marble more, are black, some are tenderer. MARC testing shows this varies by breed group from 4.47kg to 5.78kg(almost 3 lbs) but also varies within breed. DNA testing allows the breeder to fine tune his program and insure quality beef. DNA is cross-breed effective. Tenderness can be transferred just as homozygous black. Tender Bulls have tender calves. All consumer surveys show customers are willing to pay more (one survey said $2.67 per pound more) for guarenteed tender meat. I hope this answers some questions. We have been doing this for some time and I believe in its value.
 

ollie

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From what I little I have heard and read the calpain and calpastatin aspects are only a small part of tenderness.
 
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cattle_gal

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Thanks everyone for you votes and comments. Keep it a coming.

Thanks Paul and LA for posting the links. I have not been to the website of igenity.

Here’s a little more info for you Certherf. The highest marbling breed is Waygu. With the highest incidence of the marbling gene. The marbling gene just the one associated with IMF but is not associated with the rib fat and rump fat. There are a lot of genes that they are working on to find out what goes where.

The pressure test results for tenderness from the bovine Solutions (the American company of geniticsolutions) is here - http://www.bovigensolutions.com/html/tender.html

How starring in the dam and sire relates to the offspring on marbling can be found here -
http://www.bovigensolutions.com/html/marbling.htmland here -
http://geneticsolutions.com.au/content/products_c1.asp?name=GeneNOTE1

Where I need to find is some in the mouth taste testing with consumers and panels.

Where do I stand on GeneSTAR. I've always been interested in this. Try to keep up with tech and science.
 

ollie

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ollie":1rva1qp8 said:
From what I little I have heard and read the calpain and calpastatin aspects are only a small part of tenderness.
Genetic Approaches to Predicting Meat Tenderness

Many scientists and producers have suggested that controlling the genetics of the slaughter cattle population would entirely solve the beef industry's tenderness problem. I agree that genetics makes a significant contribution to the total variation in tenderness as tenderness varies among and within breeds (Figure 4; Wheeler et al., 1995a). However, analyses indicate that genetic and environmental factors make about an equal contribution to variation in tenderness. The best estimates indicate that, within a single breed, genetics controls about 30% of the variation in beef tenderness. This 30% represents the heritability (additive gene effects) of tenderness (Koch et al., 1982) within a breed. Therefore, within a breed, 70% of the variation is explained by environmental and non-additive gene effects. Between breed variation is about equal to or less than variation within breeds. Therefore, among cattle of all breeds, approximately 46% of the variation in tenderness is genetic and 54% is environmental. Thus, significant improvement in tenderness can be made by controlling those factors responsible for the environmental effects such as time on feed (high energy diet), stress, carcass chilling, postmortem aging time (Figure 2), cooking method, and end point temperature, as well as through selection of breeds or genetic selection within breed.
 
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cattle_gal

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I believe this is the article GreenWillow was refering to. Came from the Herf America site.

Finally—A Test for Tenderness

Delivering beef consumers a guaranteed tender product took a light-years leap toward reality recently with the introduction of GeneSTAR Tenderness®, a DNA-based test that identifies variants of the calpastatin gene, a naturally occurring enzyme that inhibits normal meat tenderization during post-harvest aging.

In fact, research conducted ahead of launching the test—the industry’s first viable pre-harvest tenderness selection tool—indicates that testing and selecting for differences in the calpastatin gene reduces the number of tough eating steaks by at least half.

Such improvement would provide the industry exponential benefit considering the fact that consumer taste panels continue to identify beef tenderness as the primary component of eating satisfaction.

"A major scientific effort has now delivered beef producers a simple live animal test that will help them meet customer expectations," explains Jay Hetzel, Chief Scientific Officer for Australia-based Genetic Solutions, which is marketing the test. "GeneSTAR Tenderness should have long-term benefits for beef quality around the world."

What It Is

Until now, measuring tenderness practically has been a vexing challenge because so many pre-harvest and post-harvest variables affect this important trait.

Realistically, the only reliable post harvest method so far requires the use of Warner Bratzler Shear Force (WBSF) instruments that measure the amount of force it takes to cut through a piece of meat. That means the only chance to select for tenderness genetically has been to collect WBSF data from a sire’s progeny—extremely difficult and costly. GeneSTAR Tenderness changes that. Based upon gene marker research conducted by Australia’s Cattle and Beef Quality Cooperative Research Center, CSIRO Livestock Industries and Meat and Livestock Australia, the GeneSTAR Tenderness test identifies two variations of the calpastatin gene—one associated with increased tenderness and the other associated with increased toughness.

In independent studies carried out by the research consortium and encompassing 5,016 carcasses, only 8 % of the carcasses from cattle with two copies of the tender-friendly calpastatin yielded Warner Bratzler Shear Force (WBSF) values regarded as tough (12.5 lb. or greater), compared to 21% of the carcasses that were devoid of the tender-friendly gene. In between, 13% of the carcasses with a single copy of the tender-friendly gene were measured as tough. All told, carcasses with two copies of the tender gene were almost a full pound of WBSF more tender than those with two copies of the tough gene.

What’s more, the study underscores the fact that there are differences in frequency of the tender gene between breeds as well as within a breed (Figure 1). On average, 80% of the British breeds in the study contained two copies of the tender gene, compared to approximately 30% for the Brahman cattle evaluated; and 55-60% for the Bos Indicus composites that were genotyped. Researchers emphasize, however, all breeds in the study included animals that carried the tough gene.

Hetzel points out the gene involved in the GeneSTAR Tenderness test is only one gene impacting tenderness, but he adds, "The effects of selection using this test are permanent and cumulative within the herd."

In addition, because the relationship between marbling and tenderness is known to be positive though weak, any tenderness gains should not be at the expense of increased marbling. Incidentally, Genetic Solutions introduced the world’s first commercial DNA test for a beef production trait two years ago with the GeneSTAR Marbling evaluation. This test, which identifies the presence of the thyroglobulin gene—indicating increased levels of marbling—is being used by cattle producers around the world today.

How It’s Used

While GeneSTAR Tenderness can be used to evaluate tenderness at the carcass stage, Genetic Solutions expects most initial use to come from seedstock producers who use the test to construct genetic tenderness profiles of their herds and to use in selecting sires. As well, commercial producers may begin asking their seedstock suppliers for a tenderness evaluation of prospective purchases.

"From a genetic point of view, the critical control point for herd tenderness is at each mating," explains Hetzel. "By selectively breeding to animal with two copies of the tender gene, breeders could ultimately eliminate animals from their herds that carry the tough form of the gene."

For producers, conducting the test is as simple as submitting tail hair follicles or thawed semen to Genetic Solutions’ laboratories.

"The commercial release of this test heralds a new era for beef consistency and consumer satisfaction capable of sustaining and growing demand."
 

amazed

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Greenwillowherefords wrote: "As I remember and understand it, eighty percent of English breeds have it, and around 30 percent of many other breeds, including continental.

Actual article:"On average, 80% of the British breeds in the study contained two copies of the tender gene, compared to approximately 30% for the Brahman cattle evaluated; and 55-60% for the Bos Indicus composites that were genotyped."

No mention of Continental cattle in the article as they are bos taurus. Does anyone have the numbers on Continental cattle.
 
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cattle_gal

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GW,

I didn't even know that was the article until I read down to the part and thought ...hum that sound familiar. I was google'n for taste test genestar. and there it was.

Amazed,

I'm trying to get results for most of the breeds. Don't know if I'll have any success. But I do know what the #2 breed is. :)
 

Longshot Cattle Co

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We tenderness test our bulls with the GeneStar test. We use the test as a tool in determining which bulls we want in our herd. It is not the only factor, but since the tenderness Genes are inherited, we would naturally want to want to utilize this trait in our decisions. We only keep 2 star bulls for our herd sires. This doesn't mean a bull with only 1 star is any less valuable, it just means that if I am using a 2 star bull, even if I had a cow with 0, the progeny is guaranteed to be a 1 star. Since my goal is to produce quality breeding stock, I like to take advantage of every tool I can! This ensures my buyers are happy whether they are buying breeding stock, or meat for their freezer. ;-)
 

greenwillowherefords

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amazed":3c2bwym5 said:
Greenwillowherefords wrote: "As I remember and understand it, eighty percent of English breeds have it, and around 30 percent of many other breeds, including continental.

Actual article:"On average, 80% of the British breeds in the study contained two copies of the tender gene, compared to approximately 30% for the Brahman cattle evaluated; and 55-60% for the Bos Indicus composites that were genotyped."

No mention of Continental cattle in the article as they are bos taurus. Does anyone have the numbers on Continental cattle.
As I said, I read two different articles. The other one may have had continentals listed. I'll look when I have time.
 
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