geld or not to geld?

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Terri

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Running Arrow Bill

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I am not an expert on gelding decisions by any means. However, my research with our males and picking the brains of various "expert" breeders (as well as reading between the lines), talking to other horse people, etc., has led me to this conclusion:

If the stallion is a "son of" (some high end stallion), then he may be worthy of keeping as a stallion...The down side is that, unless you plan to use him for your own breeding program, he MUST be shown, win at shows, and be marketed extensively.

If the stallion has a serious attitude problem, probably geld him.

Thus:

Stallion that is a "son of", has excellent disposition, has good conformation, etc., then may be a keeper as a stallion. Unless a stallion qualifies as a "breeding sire" (see above), then market for stallions is significantly less opportunistic than for geldings or good, manageable mares.

Same applies to cattle and bulls (or steers as case may be).

With bulls (probably true for stallions too), you "cull" 90 to 95% of them and keep the top 5-10% as breeding stallions (or bulls).
 

BoJones

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I had a stalion and he was 5 years old when I got tired of his attitude and gelded him but he was a beatiful horse.
 
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Terri

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This colt is very laid back. My daughter wants to start showing in 4-H and from there? Who knows. She can't show with her gelding because he had broken his knee years ago and doesn't have the conformation anymore. I would like to find a couple of App. mares (when he's older) to breed to. If he becomes unmanageable or dangerous to my daughters he will be gelded or sold.

I was considering breeding him because of all the performance/race horses in his pedigree.
 

Oldtimer

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Terri":1h5j7n91 said:
This colt is very laid back. My daughter wants to start showing in 4-H and from there? Who knows. She can't show with her gelding because he had broken his knee years ago and doesn't have the conformation anymore. I would like to find a couple of App. mares (when he's older) to breed to. If he becomes unmanageable or dangerous to my daughters he will be gelded or sold.

I was considering breeding him because of all the performance/race horses in his pedigree.

In most 4-H horse shows they will not allow a stallion to be showed- I don't know if it is a national rule or not- it is not only for the safety of the handler, but of the other kids and horses involved. A very laid back colt can turn into a dangerous situation awful quick- I don't know the age or experience of your daughter, but I do know I would not have anyone showing a stallion that was not experienced.
 
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Anonymous

Geld him, You can pay to breed to best app. stud going, for the trouble he'll cause you in the long run.
 
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Terri

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I was only going to let her show him if I gelded him. I have been leaning twards gelding him because its cheaper to get his papers. 35$ for a gelding, compared to 100 for a stud. I'll probally geld him just so when I go to South Carolina in Oct. I'll be able to board him somewhere.
Does anyone know of any good boarding stables in/around Charleston? I have called several and people have been so rude and unhelpful. I even had one barn tell me "We have no room" and hang up. They left no chance for me to say thanks thank you or anything else. What happened to Southern hospatality?

I usually read all your posts Oldtimer. I have talked to you before about my mare on the cattle pages. I don't know if you remember, but she is the one that was starved and left for dead on the side of the road. She is now fat and doing very well. I am trading her for this colt. I'd keep her, but she is to tall for me. I look really funny trying to mount her. I'm 5ft tall, she's 16hands.
 

Monica

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A good gelding will bring you way more on the resale market then a stud. Exspecialy if you do not show him at breed shows and win at wold and International shows.

Look at what alot of the High selling performance horses are, GELDINGS with top bloodlines.
 
A

Anonymous

Terri":2gy8z748 said:
I have been leaning twards gelding him because its cheaper to get his papers. 35$ for a gelding, compared to 100 for a stud.

Plus Blood typing fees, and the vet's fees, and stallion report fees, and, and, and .................

If he will make a good stallion he will make a great gelding.
 
A

Anonymous

You have to weigh the pros and cons. If you keep him for a stud, do you have the facilities to house him? Will he be happy? Are you in the breeding business? A good pedigree is only icing on the cake. Does he have perfect conformation? Are you showing and winning with him? Can he stand on his own merit?
On the other hand. Do you want your daughter to be able to show him and be safe on him? Be able to let him out with the other horses to socialize and be happy.
It's like another poster said. Good stalions make even better geldings. If he's a good looking horse and gelded for a solid mind to match, your daughter could have a promising future with him.......
 

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