Gelbvieh or Limousin

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Anonymous

I know this will be a hot topic but here goes. What are the pros and cons of these two breeds.

Which would do better in the Texas climate? What about availability of seedstock?

Thanks!
 

Cattle Rack Rancher

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I've heard good things about both breeds. I wouldn't know much about the Texas climate but the one thing I would say if you are looking at the Limos, be very careful of their temperament.
 

dun

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Gelbviehs will milk and have higher maternal values then limo. limos will muscle better, but from what I've seen of Gelvbieh, how much more could you want? To be charitable, limos can be very excitable, Gelbvieh are calmer.

dun
 
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Anonymous

I have seen some gelbvieh that milk to much . In fact my neighboor had a bad experience with a group of gelbvieh cows up through there 3rd calf .The cows were getting so thin that infact a few went down and died . He had a hard time getting them bred back . They just milked there self in the ground . He was a experienced cow man with over 200 moma cows . He bought the entire reg. group from a nationally known gelbvieh breeder here in NC. I think you will find the Limousin will be easier keeping cattle with less attention required .Just telling you what I saw and from his experience .
 

Jake

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Gelvbieh, I don't care if they milk too much that can be fixed with the bull and keeping heifers. I absolutely hate Limos now. We have a pen of 30 limos and limo cross calves in the lot right now. I had to ask my dad if he had enough money saved up for a tranquilizer gun. They are something else. THey try to jump everything and are constantly running around the pen when you walk out there to check on them. The only time they are ever "calm" is when the feeder is empty.
 

sidney411

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Hello!

I am running 14 gelbveih mommas right now and am nothing but pleased with them. I have had fullblood herefords that have bigger bags then these girls. They have all held their condition and bred back in a timely manner. Their calves grow quick and heavy at weaning time. I guess all animals within any breed can differ.
 

Roy E. Mosley Jr.

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Well the thing that I dont like about limo's is that they dont give enough milk. I seen them practically starve there calves. Gelvich limo cross would be a good cow.
 
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Anonymous

Gelbvieh is my choice of all continental breeds.
They do milk good although I've never seen them milk there selves down as was posted above.
They can get too big if you don't watch it.[1500+#]
They cross well with british breeds and will put a getto booty on anything.

Hillbilly
 

PATB

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I will let your fellow texans weigh in on which would be better for your area. I would look at a Gelbveigh balancer unless you want register stock. What are your plans for these animals? We have always had good luck with the gelbveigh cows we had but they need a higher plane of nutrition. I have no use for limo's or limo crosses.
 

txshowmom

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We run several Gelbvieh cows and they have been better milker that anything else we have on the place. They have a great temperment and will come running when they see a feed bucket. I would defietly give the Gelbviehs a try.
 
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Anonymous

i have limousin pb and x bred, cow calf, and feedlot. we have maintained a limi herd for 30 yrs in iowa and have seen drastic improvement in maternal ability, dispostion, and fertility. Limousin purists would say it happened at the expense of muscle, but I believe the REA has been maintained, it is just a smoother muscle pattern than the full french limi's. With that in mind, there is as much difference with breeds as there is between breeds, do some shopping before you jump in with both feet. our crossbred herd has dabbled with almost everything over the years. We have tried Angus, Charloais, Simm, Salers, Shorthorn, Chi-Maine, I am convince there is no perfect breed only breeders who work toward perfection.
good luck
 
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Anonymous

polledbull":277hx8x9 said:
I have seen some gelbvieh that milk to much . In fact my neighboor had a bad experience with a group of gelbvieh cows up through there 3rd calf .The cows were getting so thin that infact a few went down and died . He had a hard time getting them bred back . They just milked there self in the ground . He was a experienced cow man with over 200 moma cows . He bought the entire reg. group from a nationally known gelbvieh breeder here in NC. I think you will find the Limousin will be easier keeping cattle with less attention required .Just telling you what I saw and from his experience .


We've raised Gelbviehs for 8 and have been very pleased. However, like some of the other posts, a couple of our original cows milked way too heavy, so we culled them. We now have a group of really good cows that milk well, but not too much.

For some reason, there are breeders out there in all breeds that try to maximize traits rather than optimize traits. Consequently, some breeders think that more milk is always better; they just don't get it.

I have a few comments regarding the "experienced" cowman who bought the cows from a "nationally known" Gelbvieh breeder:

1. Not all "experienced" cowman are good cowman. There is a seedstock breeder a few hours from me who has been in the business for 40 years. He still makes the same mistake he did 40 years ago and truly couldn't pick a good heifer out of a group of average heifers. He just doesn't get it.
2. If this "experienced" cowman really knew what he was doing he would have asked the right questions before he bought the cattle and would have been able to see that the cows were too heavy of milkers.
3. Just because a herd is "nationally known" doesn't mean they are good cattle. Too often the folks that have the disposible income to go out and pay big money to start a herd and then pay big money to advertise them really don't understand basic cattle production and what makes a good brood cow or herd bull. Too often they have someone consulting them on what they should buy and more often than not they are enticed into buying a fancy show heifer or bull that is pretty, but can't survive under commercial conditions.
 

txshowmom

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1. Not all "experienced" cowman are good cowman. There is a seedstock breeder a few hours from me who has been in the business for 40 years. He still makes the same mistake he did 40 years ago and truly couldn't pick a good heifer out of a group of average heifers. He just doesn't get it.
2. If this "experienced" cowman really knew what he was doing he would have asked the right questions before he bought the cattle and would have been able to see that the cows were too heavy of milkers.
3. Just because a herd is "nationally known" doesn't mean they are good cattle. Too often the folks that have the disposible income to go out and pay big money to start a herd and then pay big money to advertise them really don't understand basic cattle production and what makes a good brood cow or herd bull. Too often they have someone consulting them on what they should buy and more often than not they are enticed into buying a fancy show heifer or bull that is pretty, but can't survive under commercial conditions.

Well said.
 
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Anonymous

Gelps are hot cows, they will come heat at a very early age. Earlier than Angus. The Gelps we have are heavy milkers. I am on the coastline of Texas, so normally we can grow rye grass fairly well. Thus we calve these cows to take advantage of the ryegrass.
I have and still run Limi bulls on these cows, it makes a great cow. Wish I had more. As for Gelbvieh bulls my luck has not been so good. You get great crossblood heifers to retain, but they seem to put more skin on a calf than a Limi. Expect a discount if you have cattle with a little ear that you are crossing them on. I have had five Gelbvieh bulls in the past and they all had foot problems. Its the main reason I quit using them. I had Limi bulls at the same time on the same rations and minerals and had no problems with them. Good luck
Rodney
 

dcara

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I was thinking about crossing a Gelbveigh with my Angus bull, What specifically should I look for to help ensure the cow or hefier will not be to heavy of a milker?
 

dun

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dcara":ro8r6vv2 said:
I was thinking about crossing a Gelbveigh with my Angus bull, What specifically should I look for to help ensure the cow or hefier will not be to heavy of a milker?

I would look for a milk EPD slightly below the breed average for milk. But if the bull is right at breed average, the same in the cow wouldn't hurt too much. You need to rememeber that you're most likely going to get a more growthy calf that can use the extra juice. Our F1 Red AngusX Gelbviehs were all relatively heavy milkers, but they needed it to supply the calves. One heifer weaned 842 lbs of calves (twins) but she milked down something awfull. The other as a heifer weaned 629 pounds with no problems and bred back first service. The one that twinned went in the freezer, the ohter now as a 4 year old doesn't even look like she's straining to raise a very good calf and is still carrying almost the same condition she calved in. The biggest problem we found that even with FS 5.5 and 6 cows and bulls the offspring at maturity are larger then the parents. This old girl weighed 1680 lbs a month and half after calving. Way too big, but she raises a great calf and maintaines her condition and breeds back first service.

dun

dun
 

dun

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txshowmom":3pr1qvc4 said:
Dun I'd love to see pictures of your gelbviehs.

All we have left is the one F1. Bull struck by lighteneing, heart attack, stroke and the folks we used to get them from sold out. I haven't been able to locate anyone with the moderate framed high quality Gelbviehs that they had that are using a Red Angus bull. I've only got one pic of her and it's the day after she calved the end of Feb and it's a lousey agle.

dun
 

Jake

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beggers can't be choosers Dun, everybody knows there are some awful pictures on my website that don't do those cows any justice so it won't bother us any to look at your bad pictures
 

dun

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kasey.jpg
 

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