galloway cattle

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Muddy":1zy07rk3 said:
Galloway2":1zy07rk3 said:
Galloway cattle on a finishing ration tend to be very slicked haired.
Somehow I didn't believe with this statement.

The ones I have seen over the past 33 years have. The higher energy the ration, the less hair the Galloway cattle had.
 
Muddy":332gzarc said:
Galloway2":332gzarc said:
Muddy":332gzarc said:
Care to share which bloodlines that can shed hair very quickly?

Our Pericles sired calves tend to have hair like their dams. In fact the people that used him on club calf bed animals were disappointed they didn't get more hair.
Knew some people that used Pericles on their club calf cows and they surely did got lot of hair.

A lot is a relative term...compared to what???

I am stating information I received as feedback from people that used him. They liked the calves, just were expecting an increase in hair.

In our 5 calf crops from him on Galloway and Angus cows, Pericles sired cattle with less hair than other bulls we have used.
 
Galloway2":19ddnydp said:
Muddy":19ddnydp said:
Galloway2":19ddnydp said:
Our Pericles sired calves tend to have hair like their dams. In fact the people that used him on club calf bed animals were disappointed they didn't get more hair.
Knew some people that used Pericles on their club calf cows and they surely did got lot of hair.

A lot is a relative term...compared to what???

I am stating information I received as feedback from people that used him. They liked the calves, just were expecting an increase in hair.

In our 5 calf crops from him on Galloway and Angus cows, Pericles sired cattle with less hair than other bulls we have used.
Solid 3" hair on the calves. Some were straight haired, others were curly haired. All were Pericles sired.
 
Solid 3" hair on the calves. Some were straight haired, others were curly haired. All were Pericles sired.[/quote]

Glad he worked for them. The others must have been wanting 4 inches or more. ;-)
 
I have seen many cases of pink eye over the years, some so severe the eyes turn white, and some literally explode and are hanging out on the animals face, this happened even with treatment, which I think it was sulfa powder in those days. Of all the cases I have seen only one was a non- Hereford, and that one was a red angus..
All the time and money invested on those animals was wasted, and there was a good number of them. All the potential breeding heifers that went blind were basically good for nothing but slaughter.
Concerning wild and crazy animals, in this country Angus and Simmental are top of the list for insane behavior. I am not sure if possibly the first breeding stock that was brought into this country were of they wilder type or what, but some of the real crazy angus from "out west" as they are known around here, have a strong reputation for being violently aggressive. They often even look different than some of the calmer ones, with a slightly more rounded body type while the calmer Angus tend to have a more angular structure.
One man I talked to told me his angus cattle were so aggressive that one couldn't ride a horse or take a quad out in the fields as the cattle would attack, and he tolerated it, he said because of bear and cougar problems. However I don't buy his reasoning, as he also had Piedmontese, and he said they never were aggressive towards people, but would put the run on wild animals..
Another complaint that floats around this area in the low cutability of many of the
Angus in this area, yet both the Angus and Simmental are an eating machine at the hay feeder, with low feed efficiency. Having long winters and usually only one cut of hay ( if you are lucky you might get 2 cuts per year on an exceptional summer) and high hay prices , you want something that is feed efficient and that can pack on the pounds on lower quality "bush –meadow " grass.
In this country, hair can be an asset not a liability, as long as it sheds in summer.
 
Sounds like a management issue than a breed issue, Nite Hawk. Can't really blame on an entire breed because of a particular person didn't cull the crazy ones or didn't use any preventions for pinkeye.

BTW, Galloways are not immune to pinkeye either.
 
Unfortunately, aggressive, and very spooky black Angus cattle are quite widespread throughout our area. The red angus in this area seem to be calmer in general than the black bloodlines, so it makes me wonder what the initial seedstock that was brought into this area was like..
 
I am guessing, but I would think that possibly way back at the beginings of both the Angus and Galloway, they probably had similar ancestry, but from the pictures it seems the galloway might be a bit more stocky than the angus, but with a lot of hair it is kinda hard to tell unless they are in their summer coat.
Is this true that the galloway are heavier bodied in general, than the angus??
 
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