Fuel prices

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preston39

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Caustic Burno":1tmeu9ae said:
Now I ain't going to put my dog in this as I aint no fuel expert,I just have one question. If a gallon of cooking oil at the local grocery cost 4 bucks how are they going to make it cheaper,and how is that costing me less?
==========
That really shows a level of intellect.

The used vegetable oil converted into bio diesel is worthless before being processed. Do you really think you can miss lead folks with that shot of fog?

Next time follow your advice and keep the dog out .
 

Tod Dague

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preston39":vmfcfusk said:
Caustic Burno":vmfcfusk said:
Now I ain't going to put my dog in this as I aint no fuel expert,I just have one question. If a gallon of cooking oil at the local grocery cost 4 bucks how are they going to make it cheaper,and how is that costing me less?
==========
That really shows a level of intellect.

The used vegetable oil converted into bio diesel is worthless before being processed. Do you really think you can miss lead folks with that shot of fog?

Next time follow your advice and keep the dog out .

I think his point was that if the raw product is already more expensive than diesel. How does processing it make it cheaper?
 

Campground Cattle

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preston39":2p3xavm3 said:
Caustic Burno":2p3xavm3 said:
Now I ain't going to put my dog in this as I aint no fuel expert,I just have one question. If a gallon of cooking oil at the local grocery cost 4 bucks how are they going to make it cheaper,and how is that costing me less?
==========
That really shows a level of intellect.

The used vegetable oil converted into bio diesel is worthless before being processed. Do you really think you can miss lead folks with that shot of fog?

Next time follow your advice and keep the dog out .

Dang Preston you are dumber than a sack full of hammers.Two of most important factors other than the type of oil are how long the oil was used and how old it is. The high heat of cooking creates free fatty acids in the oil, and accelerates the oxidation process. Neither of these are good for the oil if it is to be used as a fuel. So in your weak mind our energy future is dependent upon you not burning any of the cooking oil or you being to lazy to change it out at your Mc Donalds job. Now our country has a 630,000,000 million gallon a day appetite for refined products or 15,000,000 million barrel a day. So with your estimates of using used oil the average American would need to use 21 gallons a day to supply our countries energy needs, thats a lot of french fries. Even at one tenth the average American still needs to use 2.1 gallons of cooking oil for every man women and child. Your biodiesel is less than a dollar a gallon but the average American household is know spending 24 dollars a day for cooking oil. Even if you were going to make 200,000 barrels a day of biodiesel which is a drop in the bucket of our daily consumption that still requires every American to use a third of a gallon a day of cooking oil, thats still a lot of French fries. Preston follow the yellow brick road.
 

Campground Cattle

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MSNBC
Updated: 3:03 p.m. ET July 28, 2005




With oil and gasoline prices pushing to new highs and global demand projected to grow faster than production capacity, consumers are understandably puzzled by an ongoing energy enigma. Simply put: Why haven’t alternative energy sources — from renewables like solar and wind power to alternative fossil fuels like coal — kicked in to take up the slack? And how long before these non-oil energy sources begin to make a difference?

Thirty years after the “oil shocks” of the 1970s signaled the end of cheap, reliable supplies of oil, the global economy is still dependant on petroleum. And despite billions of dollars in research grants and government subsidies, no alternative energy source has yet been developed to replace it.

Now, with oil prices at $60 a barrel and supplies tighter than they were 30 years ago, analysts, scientists and businesses working to develop alternatives say it will be decades — at least —before the global economy’s reliance on oil can be broken.


‘We’re going to be talking about weaning ourselves from fossil fuels for many, many decades to come.’


— Ryan Wiser
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


“There’s just no silver bullet here," said Ryan Wiser, a scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who specializes in the economics of renewable energy. "There is no singular technology — renewables, nuclear, what have you — that’s going to replace fossil fuels in the near future. We’re going to be talking about weaning ourselves from fossil fuels for many, many decades to come. There’s no way around it.”

Renewable energy sources are hardly new. Photovoltaic solar power cells have provided electricity to locations not served by the grid — from remote homes to missions to Mars — since they were first invented in the 1950s. When nuclear power was introduced at about the same time, it was thought that one day it would be “too cheap to meter.” Wind and water have been used to power mills for centuries — long before the electrical grid was created.

And "biomass" — in the form of wood or other combustibles — was the world's first energy source until the middle of the 19th Century, when the development of railroads, which made possible the production of millions of tons of coal, reduced the reliance on wood for fuel.

But from that day “Colonel” Edwin Drake drilled the first commercial oil well in 1857 in Titusville, Penn., petroleum began to edge out other contenders as the fuel of choice. In 1901, when speculators hit the first Texas gusher on Spindletop Hill near Beaumont, the multi-billion-dollar oil industry was born. With crude oil trading for less than $20 a barrel for most of the 20th century, refined products like gasoline and kerosene provided a cheap, safe, reliable, versatile and easily-transported energy source that alternatives simply couldn't compete with.


Now, with a surge in oil demand coming from huge developing economies like China and India —— on top of continued growth in demand from the developed world — the world’s oil producers are struggling to keep up. For the first time in its history, OPEC is producing at just about full capacity and can't keep enough oil flowing to curb the recent rise in prices.
 

preston39

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Tod Dague":gomeyawr said:
preston39":gomeyawr said:
Caustic Burno":gomeyawr said:
Now I ain't going to put my dog in this as I aint no fuel expert,I just have one question. If a gallon of cooking oil at the local grocery cost 4 bucks how are they going to make it cheaper,and how is that costing me less?
==========
That really shows a level of intellect.

The used vegetable oil converted into bio diesel is worthless before being processed. Do you really think you can miss lead folks with that shot of fog?

Next time follow your advice and keep the dog out .

I think his point was that if the raw product is already more expensive than diesel. How does processing it make it cheaper?
=======
Tod,
The used vegetable oil being processed for bio diesel has no value and historically it was dumped. The bio diesel process takes that used oil and converts a $.0 value substance into diesel fuel.That is just one of the bio diesel raw materials.
 

Crowderfarms

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preston39":3a5cgl89 said:
Tod Dague":3a5cgl89 said:
preston39":3a5cgl89 said:
Caustic Burno":3a5cgl89 said:
Now I ain't going to put my dog in this as I aint no fuel expert,I just have one question. If a gallon of cooking oil at the local grocery cost 4 bucks how are they going to make it cheaper,and how is that costing me less?
==========
That really shows a level of intellect.

The used vegetable oil converted into bio diesel is worthless before being processed. Do you really think you can miss lead folks with that shot of fog?

Next time follow your advice and keep the dog out .
I think his point was that if the raw product is already more expensive than diesel. How does processing it make it cheaper?
=======
Tod,
The used vegetable oil being processed for bio diesel has no value and historically it was dumped. The bio diesel process takes that used oil and converts a $.0 value substance into diesel fuel.That is just one of the bio diesel raw materials.
Wrong again Mr. Prestone! Ever heard the word SOAP? I personally have a friend that owns a company that buys almost all the cooking oil from many restaurant chains for uses that might even surprise you. It was not dumped...
 

dj

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Crowder check with your friend I think used cooking oil is bringing top $$ right now? Preston, I don't think anyone has been dumping oil for awhile now. can you spell EPA.
Now questions for someone smarter than I.

Could used oil be blended with gas to make diesel type fuel?

And what would the benefits of an 85% alcohol/gas fuel be.
If everyone drove these type veh would it ease refining and help kick start the already blooming ethanol business?
 

preston39

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dj":1db2uzlb said:
Crowder check with your friend I think used cooking oil is bringing top $$ right now? Preston, I don't think anyone has been dumping oil for awhile now. can you spell EPA.
Now questions for someone smarter than I.

Could used oil be blended with gas to make diesel type fuel?

And what would the benefits of an 85% alcohol/gas fuel be.
If everyone drove these type veh would it ease refining and help kick start the already blooming ethanol business?
==
dj
"Dumped"...is a generic term...meaning out of the process from which it was intended. EPA doesn'tcontrol the dumping of vegetable oil ...as vegetable oil....except into streams.
 

Crowderfarms

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preston39":z0j75ejf said:
dj":z0j75ejf said:
Crowder check with your friend I think used cooking oil is bringing top $$ right now? Preston, I don't think anyone has been dumping oil for awhile now. can you spell EPA.
Now questions for someone smarter than I.

Could used oil be blended with gas to make diesel type fuel?

And what would the benefits of an 85% alcohol/gas fuel be.
If everyone drove these type veh would it ease refining and help kick start the already blooming ethanol business?
==
dj
"Dumped"...is a generic term...meaning out of the process from which it was intended. EPA doesn'tcontrol the dumping of vegetable oil ...as vegetable oil....except into streams.
I think you better check again. Wrong again.
 

preston39

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Crowderfarms":35g0nipq said:
preston39":35g0nipq said:
dj":35g0nipq said:
Crowder check with your friend I think used cooking oil is bringing top $$ right now? Preston, I don't think anyone has been dumping oil for awhile now. can you spell EPA.
Now questions for someone smarter than I.

Could used oil be blended with gas to make diesel type fuel?

And what would the benefits of an 85% alcohol/gas fuel be.
If everyone drove these type veh would it ease refining and help kick start the already blooming ethanol business?
==
dj
"Dumped"...is a generic term...meaning out of the process from which it was intended. EPA doesn'tcontrol the dumping of vegetable oil ...as vegetable oil....except into streams.
I think you better check again. Wrong again.
======
show me.
 

Crowderfarms

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Put this on your Whale sandwich with Tartar sauce.:http://www.rightnation.us/forums/lofiversion/index.php/t78732.html And this is an excerpt from the website...

FYI -

In most municipalities where sewers are in use, it is illegal to dump restaurant grease and oil down the drain. The grease and fat would rended the sewers useless in a short period of time (and in fact could become a fire hazard). Collection traps (grease traps) and holding vats are used by restaurants to collect the oils and fats for collection and disposal by a waste oil collection company. Restaurants pay dearly for this service but it is a mandated by law control. The oils and fats are usually taken to incinerators to be burned. Now, at least some of that waste is being re-used as a diesel fuel substitute. Here in Florida, we have several municipalities that are using the waste oil in their buses. It actually burns cleaner than diesel (less particulants) and, yes they do smell like a rolling McDonalds on a hot day - but they don't smell like a bus anymore so I guess that's also an improvement.

Want some more???
 

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