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freezer beef

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Anonymous

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does anybody have any information on a freezer beef operation. i have heard of this but know nothing about it. i have a small farm and might be interested in this. anyone that knows about it or is running one please give me some info on it. i think this ois where you raise freezer beef for people that want beef in bulk.

thanks tommy
 
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Anonymous

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tommy":1uv8rgj6 said:
does anybody have any information on a freezer beef operation. i have heard of this but know nothing about it. i have a small farm and might be interested in this. anyone that knows about it or is running one please give me some info on it. i think this ois where you raise freezer beef for people that want beef in bulk.

thanks tommy

You are right.
 
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Anonymous

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how does this operation work ... how do u charge/what about the board of health,etc..

thanks tommy
 

la4angus

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tommy":66645uoy said:
how does this operation work ... how do u charge/what about the board of health,etc..

thanks tommy

Tell us where you are ie; state, nearest fair sized towns, what type of facilities do you have, how many acres, grass fed, grain fed, grain on grass, how close is your nearest slaughter house; locker plant?
This all is important for us to give any solid advice.
 

D.R. Cattle

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I sell a freezer beef every now and then. I found it best to have a relationship with someone that can handle the slaughter and packaging, but not to get involved in that portion. Once the animal is sold, it's off your hands, but you directed your customer to work one on one with the packer to process to his own specs and relieve you of any liability. Are you trying to sell individual cuts, boxed beef, live, carcass or what? You have to get real close with a packer to sell anything other than "on the hoof".
 

cattletom

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i am in north mississippi. we have a small farm(30 acres) we hgave good grass and feed good hay and a corn/grain mix in the cold months. we have 8 mamas , one bull, and 2 calves. we are just looking for something to help offset the cost. also something unique in our area. we have 2 barns plenty of room. we have a catch pen/weaning pen/and a chute with head gate. any advice would be helpful

thanlks tommy
 

dun

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You may want to talk to smaller butcher shops or if you have any custom killers in your area, they may know of a market.

dun

cattletom":2kgkj66h said:
i am in north mississippi. we have a small farm(30 acres) we hgave good grass and feed good hay and a corn/grain mix in the cold months. we have 8 mamas , one bull, and 2 calves. we are just looking for something to help offset the cost. also something unique in our area. we have 2 barns plenty of room. we have a catch pen/weaning pen/and a chute with head gate. any advice would be helpful

thanlks tommy
 

Ann Bledsoe

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I raise a couple freezer beefs a year, they don't make any profit, but they pay for themselves and fill my own freezer as well.
I'm in Nebraska and buy newborn calves at the salebarn, bottlefeed them, then raise them on up to butchering size.
I do all the butchering around here, mainly rabbits and poultry, as well as wild game (deer & elk) and those 2 beefs yearly.

Here in Nebraska, we have laws that allow me to butcher for people without being USDA inspected. I cannot sell butchered meat. But the law does allow me to sell the animal live and then butcher it (at a fee) for the purchaser. (Or to charge a fee to butcher wild game.)
The purchaser has the right to have his/her animal butchered/processed by whomever they please.
The thing is establishing the point of sale -- while it is not legal to just pull butchered meat out of the freezer and sell it, it is perfectly legal to discuss the deal with the purchaser (even over the phone), agree on the price, butcher the animal, then purchaser picks up butchered meat later and pays at that time. The initial discussion is the point of sale.

I don't know about other areas, but around here there are lots of small processing plants that will custom butcher -- usually anyplace that advertises deer processing will custom butcher a beef.

I've never had any problem at with getting buyers for the animals, I've never had to advertise -- people pull in off the highway to inquire about them. If I were to raise enough butcher animals to meet the demand, that would be all I'd have here!

Ann B

cattletom":2cs5xd4u said:
i am in north mississippi. we have a small farm(30 acres) we hgave good grass and feed good hay and a corn/grain mix in the cold months. we have 8 mamas , one bull, and 2 calves. we are just looking for something to help offset the cost. also something unique in our area. we have 2 barns plenty of room. we have a catch pen/weaning pen/and a chute with head gate. any advice would be helpful

thanlks tommy
 
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Anonymous

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I have a family that owns a slauther house, they are USDA inspected and all around good people. They charge 35$ to kill and 33 cents a pound for hanging weight to custom cut( any way you want it)and they vacuum pack it. Also I hang my beef for 16 to 19 day before thay pack it. Once again they are very nice people and I feel good about them. They showed me their plant and the cooler where thay have 20 to 30 beefs hanging at any one time. This is just general info and is current( Killed last on in Nov.)by the way it was a 1300 lb. Black angus steer about 18 mo. old and feed of with corn and clean bermure grass for 70 days. The stakes are great as expected but the ground beef is the best..ALF.....
 

sillco

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Tommy;
I live in Wisconsin and I raise a few freezer calves each year. I purchase 500 lb. steers and grass feed them through the growing season. We have cool season grasses that have very high food value. I begain marketing them before I purchase the calves and continue to market them the entire time I am grazing them. I live about 30 miles east of Madison and 50 miles west of Milwaukee which gives me a good market for this type of product. The calves are not finished out and are sold as young, tender, grass fed beef. The cuts are almost half sized. I get in the range of $3.50 per lb. hanging, cut, wraped and froozen. To remind my customers about the progrom and to receive feedback I send out questionairs about four to six months following the sale with a stamped envolope to gain information on how to improve the product and service. I always get top scores and good information. Our State requrese at least State inspection at the harvest plant if the product is sold. If you sell across state lines you will require Federal inspection (USDA). Good luck.
 

Campground Cattle

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I sell some freezer beef normally for a dollar a pound at 1000 lbs. I transport the animal to a local slaughter house and the customer pays kill fees and cut and wrapping cost. I have a good repeat business most of my customers want the black baldies
 

MrBilly

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I sell freezer beef :clap: .

There is no sense in doing this if you can not make a profit. There is a lot of work if your doing it correctly. Mine are grain fed and raised on pasture. We sell a minimum 1/4 share in a live animal, which gets them the meat from a 1/4 carcass, but actually they provide the customer with meat from a split half which is meat from both front and hind quarters so it is more equitable for the buyers of two quarters on a single side.

We are in GA.

First, I took a look at all of my expenses, including depretiation, taxes on the farm, cost of getting a calf to weaning, my labor, medications, feed, etc. etc. and then came up with the total cost and then decided how much I wanted to make on the deal and charge that. I sell only animals that are born on the farm, this is because I want carcass data and I want it to be a very good experience for the customer. We aim for mid choice or better meat.

Once I have the amount, I assume the animal will be around 1200 lb live wt, so divide it out and come up with a price per pound. You can do the math on the projected cost of slaughter which is based on a hanging wt. of 60% of live wt. Then you can calculate how much meat will result in the end, which is around 30% less than the hanging wt. and then derive an approximate idea of the cost per pount of the beef cuts.

I worked with the meat lab at our University and developed what cuts would result, how many different cuts, what type and how many pounds of each would result from a live animal of around 1200 lb....I use the meat cuts breakdown when I do my store surveys for comparison pricing for a quarter carcass. The meat from an split half of an animal gives about 126 lb of retail product and is going to cost around $3.76 /lb. I make it very clear this amount of meat will vary widely so the costs will vary per pound of product also.

Once you get this cost, you can see if you are in the ball park and competitive. Since beef prices are higher this year that is why our price per pound this year is less than in a store.

Last year we charged $1.39/lb live wt which put the retail product derived from the beast in the middle between Wally World and other local supermarkets. This year we are charging $1.50/lb live w t, and our survey at two supers put us about $1 less than them. Maybe I should charge more, but I am not greedy, just want a good return. There also needs to be a hedge in your formula for increasing grain costs that might occur during the feeding cycle.

There are all kinds of regulations, once you have what you feel is a comfortable plan for you, talk with you state AG people, they will be very helpful so as not to get your self in a bind. Also see the book, A Legal Guide to Direct Farm Marketing, by Neal Hamilton which can be purchased from Acres website.

We sell the live animal. Because I do not have a cattle hauling license, and don't want one either, I deliver the animal to a USDA slaughter plant, at the moment they hit the ground and are weighed the purchaser owns the animal. I send them a bill on the live wt and tell them the haning wt. and what the costs for processing will be at the time they pick up the beef. After aging and wrapping, they pick up the meat and pay for the slaughter services. I DO NOT SELL OR TOUCH the meat, I do not sell beef, I sell animals. I do not store meat and then give it out for sale. That is a whole other venture that I am not into.

I guarantee delivery of a live animal. You must charge tax on the animal, not the procesing, since you are not selling the beast to someone practicing animal husbandry it is taxed, whereas if you sell the beast to a fellow cattlemen for inclusion in his herd, there is no tax. The tax is based on the point of sale, which in my case is the slaughter house location. You must also pay the $1 beef check off (actually the buyer is supposed to do this, but I do it to make it easy and be sure it is done). Not paying the check off could result in you suffering a $5000 fine for each infraction.

Good Luck. :cboy:

Have fun,

Bill
 
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