Ford 6610 cold start

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Ouachita

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Can someone enlighten me on cold starting my Ford 6610. I bought this tractor back in the spring and haven't needed to start it in cold weather yet (it was 19 this am). There is a "push button" on the fuel control. I was told this is an enrichment valve??? for enriching the mixture for cold starts. Is that button supposed to stay in when I push it? Is the throttle supposed to be in a certain position for this feature to work? I have a new, good hot battery, but all it wants to do is crank and occasionally puff-cough-puff. Can anybody shed some light on how this feature works? It was about 30* yesterday and started fine.
Also, is diesil fuel formulated as summer and winter mixtures like gasoline? I'm still burning from tanks I filled in July
 

Mat Man

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Not familure to "pushbutton"but alot of the fords have a manafold heater where you use the key. Turn the key in about 2 oclock for about 30 secs.In cold weather you my have to do more than once in between trying to start.There is a differance in summer fuel and winter fuel in some states.Pour antigel & injection cleaner in fuel. Good luck
 

dun

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Turn the key to the on position and push in on the key and hold it in for 30-45 seconds.
 

dun

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Isomade":3lwzlm2p said:
Block heater
That's what I put in mine last year. Sure makes it nice on cold mornings when the heater actaully pumps warm air when you first start it.
 
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Ouachita

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dun":2sxtudf3 said:
Turn the key to the on position and push in on the key and hold it in for 30-45 seconds.

Mine does not have a key switch that pushes in, nor glow plugs. It does have a block heater. Unfortunately, no electricity. Mine has a button on the fuel control. I went back out and tried it again This time when I pushed it in, it stayed in like I think it should. It cranked over a few times and started right up. I did open the throttle more than when I tried earlier, so maybe thats it. Owners manual is my shop on the other side town. Thanks for the help
 

highgrit

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Push the throttle 1/2 way up and push the fuel button in give it a small shot of starting fluid. Hit the key and hpoe it starts. My old Ford backhoe has a place where and can of starting fluid goes for cold starts. After it starts make sure the fuel button pops out, if not you won't have any power.
 

Mat Man

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Some of them has a key that you hold at 2 or 3 oclock they do not push in on some of them. Look on manafold close to #1 cylnder for electric wire that should be the heater.It should heatup while you hold key at 2 or 3 oclock.
 
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Ouachita

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I appreciate the replies and tips. I think the problem was the operator. The enrichment button is operating as advertised now, although I'm not sure it was early this morning. I think I should have opened the throttle a bit more the first time. It started fine after I did that. I've never used the block heater. Power is back now, so I can try that tomorrow morning.
 

hrsr

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My old Ford 8000 has what the book calls an excess fuel button to aid in cold weather starting. This button is actually located right on the injector pump and the instructions say to open the throttle wide open then push the button in and then pull the throttle half way back before attempting to start. It is emphasized that the throttle must be wide open when the button is pushed in and says that if it takes a second attempt to get the tractor started to once again open the throttle wide and push the button a second time. Once the tractor is running the button will pop out automatically. I suspect what your 6610 has is similar but may have a linkage so you do not have to get on and off the tractor.
 

SRBeef

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Especially in AR where the diesel may not be really formulated for winter, I would add some Howe's Fuel additive to the fuel tank. The advantage of Howe's over some other diesel fuel additives is that it is impossible to add too much. Whereas Power Service or others should add just what the label says and no more. You can get Howe's at a truck stop.

Also: forget biodiesel fuel anytime the tree leaves start turning color in the fall until tree leaves are green again in the spring. Think of it like deep fryer cooking grease. You know what that looks like when it gets cold.

Maybe replace fuel filter if you haven't done so for awhile.

Use a trickle charger full time on the battery when the weather gets below freezing for long. Push the clutch in when cranking.

Block heater plugged in for an hour or two when temp is below about 20 degrees F makes starting my 7610 a lot easier. But still need to take care of diesel fuel.

Good luck.

Jim
 
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Ouachita

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hrsr":1pdvpt32 said:
My old Ford 8000 has what the book calls an excess fuel button to aid in cold weather starting. This button is actually located right on the injector pump and the instructions say to open the throttle wide open then push the button in and then pull the throttle half way back before attempting to start. It is emphasized that the throttle must be wide open when the button is pushed in and says that if it takes a second attempt to get the tractor started to once again open the throttle wide and push the button a second time. Once the tractor is running the button will pop out automatically. I suspect what your 6610 has is similar but may have a linkage so you do not have to get on and off the tractor.
Thank you kindly hrsr!! I don't have my owners manual handy today, and weather has been a causal factor in both the non-start, and retrieving the manual. I did get it started. At this point in time, it does appear the entire situation was due to my own lack of preparadness and ignorance. Yes, the button does pop back out on its own after start-up.
 
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Ouachita

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SRBeef":1avozyxe said:
Especially in AR where the diesel may not be really formulated for winter, I would add some Howe's Fuel additive to the fuel tank. The advantage of Howe's over some other diesel fuel additives is that it is impossible to add too much. Whereas Power Service or others should add just what the label says and no more. You can get Howe's at a truck stop.

Also: forget biodiesel fuel anytime the tree leaves start turning color in the fall until tree leaves are green again in the spring. Think of it like deep fryer cooking grease. You know what that looks like when it gets cold.

Maybe replace fuel filter if you haven't done so for awhile.

Use a trickle charger full time on the battery when the weather gets below freezing for long. Push the clutch in when cranking.

Block heater plugged in for an hour or two when temp is below about 20 degrees F makes starting my 7610 a lot easier. But still need to take care of diesel fuel.

Good luck.

Jim

Thanks Jim. I know my success was buried in one of my earlier post, but I did get it started. I was not familiar with the enrichment button, and since it didn't start the first couple rounds I thought I would ask advice. I went back out and opened the thottle a bit more and fired right up. I have a block heater, but power was out this morning due to the storm. My first time to use the "button". Feel like a virgin
 

lavacarancher

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My Ford diesel has the "push button". It is located on the fuel pump and pushing it locks it in until the engine starts then the button pops out. When the engine starts you may need to hit the button once or twice to keep it running. There will be a lot of black smoke coming from the engine as it tries to start using the button.

Never had to use a block heater or anything like that but then we don't usually get temps down that low. Also, I don't like to get out when its that cold. You might also try a propane torch to heat the intake manifold a little. Won't take much heat and it'll fire up.
 

ERNIBIGB

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Not familiar with the pushbutton on the fuel pump. On ours we turn the key toward start until dash lights go off, hold for several seconds. This activates the manifold heater. Good battery and good starter are essential.
 
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Ouachita

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I am overwhelmed by the replies. Thanks everybody.
For the record, so no one does any unnecessary research on this problem I was having, the problem was ME. The tractor started fine after I opened the throttle more than what is/was normal for a normal weather start. I've only had this tractor since spring.
For those of you with insatiable couriousity, this tractor does not have glow plugs. It does not have a manifold heater. It does not have any feature with the key switch, other than OFF, ON, START. It does have a block heater that plugs in to a standard 110v household outlet. I have never used it, and the morning I had the non-start problem the power was out due to snow storm.
My tractor has a "button" on the fuel pump (I had previously used the term "fuel control", which is a correct term for my line of work). This "button" purpose is similar to a choke on a gas rig; to enrich the mixture for cold start. I was concerned that this was not working as advertised because it would not start, so I made this post. As it turned out, simply opening the throttle more than usual did the trick. It was all me and I do feel embarassed. I do thank everybody for your advice and tips. The next morning was even colder, at 14 degrees. I pushed the button in, opened the throttle about 1/3, cranked for about 3 or 5 seconds and it started. Still haven't used the block heater, but I think I will begin doing so on really cold mornings for engine longevity reasons.
I was premature in asking for help. It's not the first time I have ask questions before really exhausting all avenues. I admit that I have gotten accustomed to relatively quick and helpful responses here on this site. Maybe this is a testament to the value of Macon's creation. (And I will say I do enjoy the friendship and "talk". Thanks again
 

greybeard

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Ouachita,
Sorry I didn't read this earlier..
You probably have a Simms type in line injector pump instead of the more common rotary or CAV type pump. Every Simms I ever saw used that "button" and Simms are used on lots of different diesel engines. (I don't think many engine manufacturers make their own pumps) I believe Simms and Minimec merged at some point, so yours may say Minemec instead of Simms. The correct name for that button btw, is "Excess fuel Button", and I have seen some applications where the throttle linkage had a piece of metal or additional linkage that engaged the button automatically--I believe it was at WOT. Other Fords require ya to pull out part way on the fuel shut off knob to engage excess fuel function. Leyland, International, Case and lots others use the Simms/Minemec pump. They're good pumps and lots easier and cheaper to overhaul than a CAV imo.
The only bad thing about them is the rack sometimes freezes up if left sitting for a long period of time unused. If you are going to let it sit a long time, go by once ina while and work the throttle and shut off.
Also, you need to make sure whether yours gets it's lower part (bearings and cam) lubed from it's own little crankcase or by oil from the engine. (the upper part gets lubed by diesel). If it gets lubed from the engine, there's usually an oil return line near the front or rear bottom of the pump casting--but not always. If not lubed from the engine, you will see what looks like a little vent tube--and it is.
 
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Ouachita

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Thanks, greybeard. See, just as I suspected, who needs an owners manual? :lol2: ;-) Really that was more enlightening than the owners manual. Thanks
 
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