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Fishing pier

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denoginnizer

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Anyone have any ideas on how to build a pier in a lake that is full of water? It is about 8 acres and I want to put about a 20 foot long fishing pier on it. It has been recently stocked so draining is not an option. The water depth starts at about a foot and gets to about 6 feet deep twenty feet from the bank.
 

plumber_greg

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If the ice in Ala. would happen to freeze a foot thick like it does in Mo., take a skid steer out and drive some posts and then build the dock in the spring. gs
 

ga. prime

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I've done what you're talking about. If the bottom of your pond is like mine, 4x4's will easily drive into it with a sledge hammer. The trick is not falling out of the boat while doing this. I think I ended up using a step ladder to stand on because I couldn't stay in the boat.
 

denoginnizer

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ga. prime":1sxvufe6 said:
I've done what you're talking about. If the bottom of your pond is like mine, 4x4's will easily drive into it with a sledge hammer. The trick is not falling out of the boat while doing this. I think I ended up using a step ladder to stand on because I couldn't stay in the boat.
Did you sharpen the end of them and how deep did you drive them?
 

ga. prime

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No I didn't need to sharpen them, the bottom was very soft for 2 ft or so. I drove them in untill they got hard to drive- when the top of the post started splintering and mashing up. You may need to sharpen them slightly if your bottom isn't that soft. I don't think the depth you drive them to is real important because the weight of your floor sills and deck boards and cross braces will hold the pilings down and in place, but they do need to be driven until they hit something hard or the whole thing will settle further upon completion of your project.
 

rusty

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55 gal drums work well for a floating dock, make frame work to fit around them so you can replace as needed.Of course plastic barrels don't rust.
 

1982vett

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denoginnizer":pnn3fexf said:
Did you sharpen the end of them and how deep did you drive them?
ga. prime":pnn3fexf said:
No I didn't need to sharpen them, the bottom was very soft for 2 ft or so. I drove them in untill they got hard to drive- when the top of the post started splintering and mashing up. You may need to sharpen them slightly if your bottom isn't that soft. I don't think the depth you drive them to is real important because the weight of your floor sills and deck boards and cross braces will hold the pilings down and in place, but they do need to be driven until they hit something hard or the whole thing will settle further upon completion of your project.

If you put a point on them they will continue to sink. Cut square they are less apt to sink.
 

Brute 23

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A family member built a pier on the coast down here and we went in with an air compressor and a pipe and you basically blow out a hole to set the post.

Same theory as above, take the loose stuff out set the post, let the loose stuff fill back in and build a solid top.
 

ga. prime

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1982vett":1bldv9u0 said:
denoginnizer":1bldv9u0 said:
Did you sharpen the end of them and how deep did you drive them?
ga. prime":1bldv9u0 said:
No I didn't need to sharpen them, the bottom was very soft for 2 ft or so. I drove them in untill they got hard to drive- when the top of the post started splintering and mashing up. You may need to sharpen them slightly if your bottom isn't that soft. I don't think the depth you drive them to is real important because the weight of your floor sills and deck boards and cross braces will hold the pilings down and in place, but they do need to be driven until they hit something hard or the whole thing will settle further upon completion of your project.

If you put a point on them they will continue to sink. Cut square they are less apt to sink.
That's good advice. They will also be harder to drive straight with a point on them.
 

dun

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Is it a natural lake or man made? If man made I would be concerned about the thickness of the clay blanket that seals the bottom. Driving piles through it or to the point that it's too thin and you'll end up with a slow leak. A couple of good anchors well set and a floating pier would be my preference
 

Angus Cowman

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I built the frame work for one 2 yrs ago out of 6" aluminum channel and the guy bolted it to the pontoons off of a pontoon boat he said he bought an old pontoon boat for $500 and then he fastened the frame I made to them and fastened the other end to the bank with post and cable worked really well
I think his dock was about 30ft
 

ga. prime

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If your piles reach the clay liner while driving them, that's about as far as they're going. What dun said is possible in theory but if your clay liner is anywhere near as hard as mine, a 4x4 won't drive into it with a sledgehammer.
 

Jogeephus

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You can take the pump off a nurse tank. Replumb the lines so you have an intake from the lake and afix a metal pipe on the outlet side. Pipe should be about 6' long. Get a step ladder and place in the lake to stand on. Fire up the pump and wash the holes you need fixing and stabalizing the posts as you go. No need to fill them in since they will do this on their own.
 

denoginnizer

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dun":r26ikwy0 said:
Is it a natural lake or man made? If man made I would be concerned about the thickness of the clay blanket that seals the bottom. Driving piles through it or to the point that it's too thin and you'll end up with a slow leak. A couple of good anchors well set and a floating pier would be my preference
It is man made and dug in gumbo clay/limerock.
 

mnmtranching

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Get some old rims and tires put on a makeshift axle. Figure out the length of the dock and how deep at the end. Make up your dock and roll it in. This REALLY makes a great dock or fishing pier.
 

mnmtranching

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Brute 23":fuhhxf03 said:
Thats a good idea, :lol2:

This is not just an idea. [I will take credit however] :cowboy:

We all do this upnort, cause of ice damage [actually destroys docks] We put them out in the spring, take them out before freeze up. Takes a few minutes if done right. HEY WE not so dumb. :compute: :D
 
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