Fingers crossed....awaiting necropsy results!

Help Support CattleToday:

Crazy Farmgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
325
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Michigan
On top of the other weird stuff going on here...it seems I have some sort of unkown illness in my herd of goats. Yes I also raise boer goats (herd numbers around 35). Long story short last friday I had one present with nuerologic signs (staggering, loss of function in hind limbs, stargazing, convulsions ect) treated with thiamine and high dose penicillin figuring it was either polio or listeria, call vet as there was no improvement. Vet exam, he feels it was some infection that went septic and that it was not contagous..Yeah! All good....til Saturday morning. Another goat with the same symptoms. I should add that we euthanized first goat. Back to vet..he's stumped. Leaves the room to return shortly to announce that I would have to get the goat to MSU for exam and necropsy! Six hours (350 miles one way) later I'm in Lansing with a goat that has been having siezures and screaming all the way! Vet there does quick exam and puts the goat (now comatos) out of it's misery. Reads me a list of could be's, several of which are contagous to both humans and animals..yippee! Then sends me on my way telling me not to worry they will do the necropsy Monday and should have answers by Thursday!!! I did not feel the least bit relieved!! So now I wait....I'm not good at this part! Hoping it is some fluke thing or least easily curable, and praying that it does not spread to the rest of the farm!!

Thanks for letting me ramble AGAIN!

You can certainly see where the "crazy" comes from in my name!!
 

Lucky_P

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Messages
3,494
Reaction score
662
Location
Western KY
CFG,
Playing the odds, I'm betting on listeriosis.
While parasites account for upwards of 90% of death losses we see in goats here in the Southeast, listeriosis is the second-most common malady we see in them; followed closely by pneumonia. Polio is certainly a possibility, depending upon grain feeding and sulfur levels in feed and water.

From my experience in practice and talking to owners submitting to the diagnostic lab, MOST goat listeria cases have a common feature - either they're grazing a low-lying boggy area, owners are feeding on the ground, or feeders are not elevated/constructed so that goats are not able to get into the feeders, tracking mud/feces into them, contaminating subsequent feedings.
 
OP
C

Crazy Farmgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
325
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Michigan
Lucky_P":wsjzxhqc said:
Polio is certainly a possibility, depending upon grain feeding and sulfur levels in feed and water.

I don't grain feed at all. I was under the impression that polio was thiamine deficiency, I was unaware that sulfur played a role in it. I'll have to do some research into that and get the water tested. Thanks.


My feeders are raised so that the goats have to stand on a step to eat. I found if I had them any lower they still manage to get feces in them.
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
11
Location
MO Ozarks
Crazy Farmgirl":3rtbi1dn said:
Lucky_P":3rtbi1dn said:
Polio is certainly a possibility, depending upon grain feeding and sulfur levels in feed and water.

I don't grain feed at all. I was under the impression that polio was thiamine deficiency, I was unaware that sulfur played a role in it. I'll have to do some research into that and get the water tested. Thanks.


My feeders are raised so that the goats have to stand on a step to eat. I found if I had them any lower they still manage to get feces in them.
Too much sulphur can cause symptoms like polio but I don;t think it's actually polio. For high corn gluten rations the mills include somehting in them (thiamin or somehting similar) to counteract it.
 
OP
C

Crazy Farmgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
325
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Michigan

Gale Seddon

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 1, 2004
Messages
1,870
Reaction score
7
Location
Mineral, VA
Crazy Farmgirl, I hope you will get this all resolved without additional losses. Must have been quite horrendous driving with the screaming goat. Goats are not the easiest animals to raise...I think they are far more fragile and susceptible than most people realize. I've never had one myself, but I have friends with them.

Hoping for the best for your herd!
 
OP
C

Crazy Farmgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
325
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Michigan
Gale..Thanks I too am hoping I can get this cleared up with no further losses. The ride to Lansing was horrible, Had they not insisted the goat be alive if possible I would have had him euthanized, I hate to have them suffer. I don't find them more difficult to raise, like most any animal the more intensively managed the more problems are likely to arise. The worst part is finding a vet that is familiar with goats, my original vet was an older gentleman that was very knowlegable about goats but he retired a few months ago and the man who took over has only treated 2 goats in his short career (and those were mine). Needless to say I am looking into another vet, prefer not to have this one earn his wings at the cost of my herd.


Beefy..The goats are all up to date on vaccinations for CD&T and wormed (also given probiotic after worming), no diet changes or any other major stressors outside of our crazy weather.
 
OP
C

Crazy Farmgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
325
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Michigan
Well I did get a little good news today...State of Michigan diagnostics lab called to let me know that the rabies test was negative! Still no word on any other results. All the animals are still healthy too, thank goodness.
 

Workinonit Farm

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2004
Messages
7,161
Reaction score
17
Location
Ctrl Virginia
You may want to send a PM to MSSCAMP, she runs goats and is pretty well versed in goat health issues, even the wierd "once-in-a-lifetime" type of health issues.

Katherine
 

Beefy

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 2, 2004
Messages
8,754
Reaction score
0
Location
Georgia
being a goat novice, i just lost a couple of mine to what i believe to be endotoxemia is the reason i asked. of course the one time i needed to buy the Antitoxin it had been recalled! figures. i also just learned that wilted/fallen red maple leaves are SUPPOSEDLY sometimes toxic to goats (but mainly horses).
 
OP
C

Crazy Farmgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
325
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Michigan
Nothing yet, well except the bill! Have called and asked but they said it could take up to 3 or 4 weeks for aome of the cultures to produce any results. I'm NOT a patient person so the waiting is killing me.
 

bunchgrass

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2011
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
Hate to say it but most times necropsies end up "inconclusive" - and I really can't believe they decided to wait until Monday to do the necropsy. A lot of things happen in the first few hours post death (that's why they had you bring a live suffering goat 350 miles to be euthanized). IMO it's sheer laziness (Fri afternoon syndrome) to put off posting your goat ASAP.

Hope things stay well with the rest of your herd.
 
OP
C

Crazy Farmgirl

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
325
Reaction score
0
Location
Northeast Michigan
Unfortunately not anything conclusive. I talked to the vet at MSU last week and was told they are tenantively calling it CAE but that test is easily false positive based on many variables. Some of the test results were still not available so he was not confident in any diagnosis yet. Luckily the rest of the herd is healthy and doing well.
 

Latest posts

Top