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Finding a cow

A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi this is my problem. I have just brought a Limousin Bull and i was just wondering what i should cross it with. I have been thinking of a Simmental or even a Charolais. So what do u think...

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A

Anonymous

Guest
Limos are a terminal cross to me. I'd go with a very maternal breed for the cow, whether purebred or crossbred. Gelbvieh, Simmental, Angus etc would be my preference. (even parthenais...) Charolais are another terminal cross sire, so a limo/charolais wouldn't be my choice.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
The North American Limousin Foundation has started a new "breeding up" program. They are suggesting members cross Limousin with Angus (Red or black)to create what they are calling Lim-Plus. Good luck...

<A HREF="http://www.nalf.org" TARGET="_blank">www.nalf.org</A>

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A

Anonymous

Guest
I totally agree with Vicki. Couldn't have put it any better. But what is PARTHENAIS? Jeanne <A HREF="http://www.SimmeValley.com" TARGET="_blank">http://www.SimmeValley.com</A>

> Limos are a terminal cross to me.
> I'd go with a very maternal breed
> for the cow, whether purebred or
> crossbred. Gelbvieh, Simmental,
> Angus etc would be my preference.
> (even parthenais...) Charolais are
> another terminal cross sire, so a
> limo/charolais wouldn't be my
> choice.

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A

Anonymous

Guest
Parthenais are a highly muscled French breed of cattle. Not as maternal as some, but a lot more than limos.

<A HREF="http://www.parthenaiscattle.org/parthenais_cattle_info.htm" TARGET="_blank">http://www.parthenaiscattle.org/parthenais_cattle_info.htm</A>
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
> Parthenais are a highly muscled
> French breed of cattle. Not as
> maternal as some, but a lot more
> than limos.

>
> <A HREF="http://www.parthenaiscattle.org/parthenais_cattle_info.htm" TARGET="_blank">http://www.parthenaiscattle.org/parthenais_cattle_info.htm</A>

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A

Anonymous

Guest
***** Cool! I picked a Red Angus bull for my Limousin cows... Thanks for the information... > The North American Limousin
> Foundation has started a new
> "breeding up" program.
> They are suggesting members cross
> Limousin with Angus (Red or
> black)to create what they are
> calling Lim-Plus. Good luck...

> <A HREF="http://www.nalf.org" TARGET="_blank">www.nalf.org</A>

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A

Anonymous

Guest
There are breeds that in crossbreeding programs are considered maternal breeds, those that can provide replaements. There are those that are terminal, everything gets sold and not replacements are kept. There are even those that are supposedly dual purpose, can go either way. Maternal breeds would be, but not limited to, angus, hereford, gelbviwh, simmenthal, shorthorn, etc. Terminal would be Blonde d'aquataine, charolais, limo., maine anjou, etc.

dunmovin farms

> Terminal cross? what does that
> mean? sounds sort of ominous....
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
What do you mean, off-colored red ones??? lol seems to me when I mentioned red being a bastardization of Angus, I was told that the original Angus were red...

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A

Anonymous

Guest
So.... I shouldn't keep my full blood Limousin heifers ... I should keep the next crop of heifers which will be half Limo and Angus.... the reason that my full blood Limousin heifers aren't to be used for replacements is because finding something to cross to is difficult? I'm starting to get confused here.... my plan was to breed my full bloods to create a cross and breed the crosses back to a Limousin to keep my herd heavy on the Limousin breeding side. If Limousin is such a terminal breed, how come there are pure breds? Is this hard to understand because I keep leaning toward the Limousin, or is it hard to understand because one needs a college education in biology to figure it all out?

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A

Anonymous

Guest
I think you were told that originally Angus could be red or black. And that’s true. Angus were introduced into the United States in the 1870s and both reds and blacks were registered in the American Angus herdbook until 1917 when reds were barred. A group of cattlemen throughout the United States started selecting for the red color in 1945. By 1954 a sufficient number of herds had been established that the Red Angus Association of America, was formed. It’s a fault in Angus to be red and the animal can’t be registered. I don’t know if it’s a fault in Red Angus to be black, though. Maybe Dunmovin can tell us? I see some black Angus show up pretty close in Red Angus pedigrees.

<A HREF="http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/cattle/" TARGET="_blank">http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/cattle/</A>

You might want to bookmark this site at Oklahoma State University. Then when someone mentions a breed, you can check it out.

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A

Anonymous

Guest
The odd colored black ones you see in Red Angus pedigrees are red carriers. Red will always breed red, I always firgured that with the black ones when the red showed up that Ma Nature had finally gotten it right.

dunmovin farms

> I think you were told that
> originally Angus could be red or
> black. And that’s true. Angus were
> introduced into the United States
> in the 1870s and both reds and
> blacks were registered in the
> American Angus herdbook until 1917
> when reds were barred. A group of
> cattlemen throughout the United
> States started selecting for the
> red color in 1945. By 1954 a
> sufficient number of herds had
> been established that the Red
> Angus Association of America, was
> formed. It’s a fault in Angus to
> be red and the animal can’t be
> registered. I don’t know if it’s a
> fault in Red Angus to be black,
> though. Maybe Dunmovin can tell
> us? I see some black Angus show up
> pretty close in Red Angus
> pedigrees.

>
> <A HREF="http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/cattle/" TARGET="_blank">http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/cattle/</A>
> You might want to bookmark this
> site at Oklahoma State University.
> Then when someone mentions a
> breed, you can check it out.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
In a "crossbreeding operation", that is the key element of the whole thing. There are purebred Blondes and Maines too, and for the commercail operators to use the purebred bulls, you need the seedstock producers to keep cranking out those bulls. Limos are not a maternal breed they are a muscle breed, most folks that study this type of stuff claim that for optimum carcass quality you want no more then 50% of those breeds and some claim that 25% is even better. You need to remember that the big deal is quality grade when you sell on the rail. The terminal breeds give you high yeild grade but low quality grade, while the British breeds are more quality grade and less yeild grade. But, you gotta raise what you like, no matter how misguided. Like the folks that raise those off colored black Angus. Typically most continentals are considered terminal and most british are considered maternal. At least something good has come from merry olde england. But not all maternal breeds are british.

dunmovin farms

> So.... I shouldn't keep my full
> blood Limousin heifers ... I
> should keep the next crop of
> heifers which will be half Limo
> and Angus.... the reason that my
> full blood Limousin heifers aren't
> to be used for replacements is
> because finding something to cross
> to is difficult? I'm starting to
> get confused here.... my plan was
> to breed my full bloods to create
> a cross and breed the crosses back
> to a Limousin to keep my herd
> heavy on the Limousin breeding
> side. If Limousin is such a
> terminal breed, how come there are
> pure breds? Is this hard to
> understand because I keep leaning
> toward the Limousin, or is it hard
> to understand because one needs a
> college education in biology to
> figure it all out?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I had cross a Limo bull with Simm. cows and at least I got great results, just waiting to cross the heifers to Simmentals, if you cross them with Charolais you will need to sell the heifers too; but you could also go with Normande and think you will have the best replacement heifer you can thought about.
> Hi this is my problem. I have just
> brought a Limousin Bull and i was
> just wondering what i should cross
> it with. I have been thinking of a
> Simmental or even a Charolais. So
> what do u think...

[email protected]
 
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