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fessque toxic

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Anonymous

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can cattle get fesque toxin from from fesque hay? or just pasture?~~~~~~~~~~~~~thanks Tc
 
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Anonymous

Guest
The toxic endophyte is present in fescue hay as well as pasture. However, stocked piled fescue does decline somewhat in toxicity after a couple of months, I believe it's following the first killing frost when it is basicly cured on the stem. Because of that, it was suggested that we may be better off to feed hay in the fall and save the stockpiled fescue for winter rather then fedding the stockpiled stuff first. U of MO has done a lot of research on the subject.

dun

> can cattle get fesque toxin from
> from fesque hay? or just
> pasture?~~~~~~~~~~~~~thanks Tc
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
Dun

I've heard that the endophyte does not decline in stored or stockpiled fescue, but that since endophyte increases body temp, you will have less problems feeding it in cooler months. I do know that endophyte infected seed that is stored for a year becomes endophyte free, but endophyte in the grass (hay) lives inside the cell walls and is protected. (All this from Iowa State experts.)

I am going to hear one of the top experts on fescue tomorrow. If I pick up anything new I will be back. Temple Grandin will be a speaker there also, so it should be an educational meeting.

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Anonymous

Guest
I would be interested on what is said about stickpiled fescue regaurding endophyte. The results that the U of MO put out were preliminary. I have heard too about the endophyte in stored seed, but I'm curious if it then looses it's persistence or germination rate.

dun

> Dun

> I've heard that the endophyte does
> not decline in stored or
> stockpiled fescue, but that since
> endophyte increases body temp, you
> will have less problems feeding it
> in cooler months. I do know that
> endophyte infected seed that is
> stored for a year becomes
> endophyte free, but endophyte in
> the grass (hay) lives inside the
> cell walls and is protected. (All
> this from Iowa State experts.)

> I am going to hear one of the top
> experts on fescue tomorrow. If I
> pick up anything new I will be
> back. Temple Grandin will be a
> speaker there also, so it should
> be an educational meeting.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
> I would be interested on what is
> said about stickpiled fescue
> regaurding endophyte. The results
> that the U of MO put out were
> preliminary. I have heard too
> about the endophyte in stored
> seed, but I'm curious if it then
> looses it's persistence or
> germination rate.

> dun

They said the endophyte "free" is basically pretty worthless. It just isn't hardy enough and the endophyte infected will come back and crowd it out in a few years.

They highly recommend planting the "friendly" endophyte fescue where possible. It is as hardy as the other, but they realize that many areas of fescue are places you wouldn't pull a drill. They say to pen the cows up for three days when they come off the regular endophyte fescue pastures before they go into a pasture without it. Else the cows will spread what is in 'em. This would apply to feeding the old fescue hay also. Sounds like a guy could change over his pastures over time as long as you keep a plan in place to keep old fescue hay and manure off new fescue pastures. Then talked about "Novel endophyte fescue" or "Max Q Fescue" and a google search for either gets you a lot of info.

On the stockpiling, they said it does appear that the effects of the endophyte dissapate in stockpiled fescue over time, but that the effects are sometimes more or less concentrated due to the growing conditions the fescue endures each year. (Drought makes for more endophyte effects.) Stockpiled fescue grazed late one winter may be worse than what was grazed early another year. In other words we need to know when the endophyte is really bad so we can make sure we let the stockpile wait that year.

Fescue - A weed for all seasons!



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Anonymous

Guest
The last questimate I heard for changing from endophyte enfested to freindly endophyte was I think 100 bucks an acre. Most of that was probably the multiple sraying to get the old stuff out. Concerning the endophyte enfested pastures and hay. We have a significant amount of clover in the pastures and even the hay fields are pretty well covered. That seems to mitigate some of the effects of the stuff. Also it helps to have cows that were raised on it so that it doesn;t bother them as much. This year we tried something a little different with fescue. Since the seed is where the majority of the endophyte is, we combined the seed then hayed the fields. It;s kind of stemmy, but there is a ton of clover in it so we'll see how it works out over the winter feeding. I've said it before, I hate fescue, but if it wasn't for fescue there would be no cattle in this part of MO

dun

> They said the endophyte
> "free" is basically
> pretty worthless. It just isn't
> hardy enough and the endophyte
> infected will come back and crowd
> it out in a few years.

> They highly recommend planting the
> "friendly" endophyte
> fescue where possible. It is as
> hardy as the other, but they
> realize that many areas of fescue
> are places you wouldn't pull a
> drill. They say to pen the cows up
> for three days when they come off
> the regular endophyte fescue
> pastures before they go into a
> pasture without it. Else the cows
> will spread what is in 'em. This
> would apply to feeding the old
> fescue hay also. Sounds like a guy
> could change over his pastures
> over time as long as you keep a
> plan in place to keep old fescue
> hay and manure off new fescue
> pastures. Then talked about
> "Novel endophyte fescue"
> or "Max Q Fescue" and a
> google search for either gets you
> a lot of info.

> On the stockpiling, they said it
> does appear that the effects of
> the endophyte dissapate in
> stockpiled fescue over time, but
> that the effects are sometimes
> more or less concentrated due to
> the growing conditions the fescue
> endures each year. (Drought makes
> for more endophyte effects.)
> Stockpiled fescue grazed late one
> winter may be worse than what was
> grazed early another year. In
> other words we need to know when
> the endophyte is really bad so we
> can make sure we let the stockpile
> wait that year.

> Fescue - A weed for all seasons!
 
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A

Anonymous

Guest
> This year we
> tried something a little different
> with fescue. Since the seed is
> where the majority of the
> endophyte is, we combined the seed
> then hayed the fields. It;s kind
> of stemmy, but there is a ton of
> clover in it so we'll see how it
> works out.

Sounds like it might be a good plan. We clip several times over the summer to keep the seed heads down. We also try to clip at the right time to scatter the clover and treefiol (sp?) seed. We are getting more clover and treefiol each year. I would hate to kill the pastures down and start over with the new fescue and have none of the clover or treefiol left. We do select for cows that seem to tolerate it better and our mineral does a good job with fescue. We may try a small pasture where the mares foal. It would be nice to have a pasture I can trust for foaling. I hate to have a mare foal in a lot.

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I would rather have another type of grass in a foaling paddock/pasture. Back in the bad old days when we were into the horse deal we foaled on bluegrass and bermuda. Of course in that area the only fescue is considered a lawn grass. If you don;t need the regrowth that fescue provides, there are a bunch of other grasses that would also serve. We have several really good orchard grass and clover pastures. We either hay them or graze them, just don't seem to be able to do both in the same year. The girls really put on the fat and the calves growth is almost beyond belief when they're on the OG.

dun

> Sounds like it might be a good
> plan. We clip several times over
> the summer to keep the seed heads
> down. We also try to clip at the
> right time to scatter the clover
> and treefiol (sp?) seed. We are
> getting more clover and treefiol
> each year. I would hate to kill
> the pastures down and start over
> with the new fescue and have none
> of the clover or treefiol left. We
> do select for cows that seem to
> tolerate it better and our mineral
> does a good job with fescue. We
> may try a small pasture where the
> mares foal. It would be nice to
> have a pasture I can trust for
> foaling. I hate to have a mare
> foal in a lot.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
> I would rather have another type
> of grass in a foaling
> paddock/pasture.

Me too. We have no ability to keep fescue out of any size pasture. We have killed down and replanted and watched the fescue move back in. We have no choice but to learn how to work around it.

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