fescue

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Anonymous

just wondering if anyone out there has tried the new variety of fescue (max q) that is not supposed to be toxic?

it has caught my attention and i am trying to find out what others think about it.

thanks

gene

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A

Anonymous

Talked to several people that have tried it, their concensus is that it's not worth the cost. None of them practice MIG and I think to have the stand persistance that endophyte infected has that it will take more intense managment.

dunmovin farms

> just wondering if anyone out there
> has tried the new variety of
> fescue (max q) that is not
> supposed to be toxic?

> it has caught my attention and i
> am trying to find out what others
> think about it.

> thanks

> gene
 
OP
A

Anonymous

MIG? i have been told that it is more of a southern grass and in missouri, it may not do as well. i think southern mo or northern ar is the northern cut off point they recommend for this variety. and if i recollect, you cant let them eat it into the ground. need to rotate on and off before it gets eaten that low.

and you're right, it is expensive.

just wanted to get other's ideas and experiences with it before i made a commitment to it.

thanks for your response,

gene

> Talked to several people that have
> tried it, their concensus is that
> it's not worth the cost. None of
> them practice MIG and I think to
> have the stand persistance that
> endophyte infected has that it
> will take more intense managment.

> dunmovin farms

[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

Gene, for god's sake don't spend a penny on grass seed, or the $27./acre plowing, $17./ac discing (twice) drilling seed & cultipacking. If you have ANY GRASS AT ALL,look at mowing the weeds and brush, intensivly grazing the ground to expose some bare spots which will let some of the seed that is laying dormant come up, rotate the animals off to let the grass outcompete the weeds. The best grasslands in the world were planted by the wind, tilled by the hoof action of heavy grazing( to bare ground) and fertilized by---, the herds would move off for a month or two and come back when the grass was ready. I bought a farm that had pastures that you couldn't drive a 100 horse tractor and a 6 foot brush hog thru. put a lot fo feeder pigs behind electric fence for a couple of summers, brush hogged what I could and the seed bank (seed dormant in the ground) built pastures as nice as what I drilled into the crop ground next to it. The best stand of clover I ever got was the year after a drought and I grazed the big pasture to dust. Dutch clover volinteered so thick I worried aboit the grass.

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A

Anonymous

If you or your neighbors have any infected fescue, or you feed any infected fescue hay, the endophyte friendly fescue will soon be replaced with infected fescue.

dunmovin farms

> MIG? i have been told that it is
> more of a southern grass and in
> missouri, it may not do as well. i
> think southern mo or northern ar
> is the northern cut off point they
> recommend for this variety. and if
> i recollect, you cant let them eat
> it into the ground. need to rotate
> on and off before it gets eaten
> that low.

> and you're right, it is expensive.

> just wanted to get other's ideas
> and experiences with it before i
> made a commitment to it.

> thanks for your response,

> gene
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Down here in Georgia Max Q has been doing very well under drought and grazing conditions. It is expensive to establish, and correct cattle from toxic fescue must be placed on non fescue pasture for three days before rotating onto Max Q or you will eventually have the toxic overtake the Max Q.

We dilute our toxic fescue by seeding white clover. Two new persistent vaireties (Durana and Patriot) have been released this year by Pennington. Developed here at the Univ of Ga. I planted eighty acreas of Durana into fescue; time will tell how persistent it really is under MIG grazing. For more on this go to:

<A HREF="http://commodities.caes.uga.edu/fieldcrops/forages/" TARGET="_blank">http://commodities.caes.uga.edu/fieldcrops/forages/</A>
 

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