Fescue

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lead_dog

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I have a pasture which has a good stand of fescue, as you can see in the photo behind my wife. The good news is that grass is growing well. The bad news, I guess, is that it's predominately fescue. The question is, given the concern about toxicosis, can I just drill in other species, such as durana clover or others, and get away with trying to decrease the density of the fescue? Does the field need to be replanted? Or should I just not worry about it?

I'm going organic, so I don't want to spray anything on it.

Thanks.

fescue.jpg
 

Weaver

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Seeding some clover in it will dillute the toxic effects some and will also provide some high quality forage during the summer months when the fescue wanes. Around here we use red or white clover and frost seed over the top into pastures in late Feb. or early March.
 

gertman

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I was told that adding white clover and orchardgrass will help with the fescue problem. I checked the price of planting kentucky 31, regal white clover, and orchardgrass versus planting Max Q and the three blend mix was cheaper per acre than straight Max Q. Plus with the clover you can cut back on the nitrogen fertilizer, that's if you can use nitrogen since you're going organic.
 

Cowdirt

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lead_dog":39d83z2v said:
I have a pasture which has a good stand of fescue, as you can see in the photo behind my wife. The good news is that grass is growing well. The bad news, I guess, is that it's predominately fescue. The question is, given the concern about toxicosis, can I just drill in other species, such as durana clover or others, and get away with trying to decrease the density of the fescue? Does the field need to be replanted? Or should I just not worry about it?

I'm going organic, so I don't want to spray anything on it.

Thanks.

fescue.jpg

I vote for: Wouldn't concern myself to much about the fescue. Makes sense though to get some clover in your stand.
 

preston39

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lead_dog":13sr7pro said:
I have a pasture which has a good stand of fescue, as you can see in the photo behind my wife. The good news is that grass is growing well. The bad news, I guess, is that it's predominately fescue. The question is, given the concern about toxicosis, can I just drill in other species, such as durana clover or others, and get away with trying to decrease the density of the fescue? Does the field need to be replanted? Or should I just not worry about it?

I'm going organic, so I don't want to spray anything on it.

Thanks.

fescue.jpg

yes...but the fescue will need cutting before the clover has a chance for growth. It's a little late.
 

dun

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This late in the season you might could hay the fescue and no till clover into the field. But the best bet is to graze it close in the fall and frost seed clover in the winter. The endophyte is concentrated pretty much in the seed heads, if you clip the seed heads before grazinf it the endophyte problems are pretty much eliminated. But thast would be a stop gap solution until you can get something in it to dilute the fescue being eaten.

dun
 
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lead_dog

lead_dog

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That's great news...I didn't realize the endophyte wasn't problematic until it got to the head stage.

We don't have cattle there now...we're putting them on first of the year. My neighbor is cutting hay now, and the plan was to cut this back in September and drill in durana clover at that time.
 

dun

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The seed head is where most of the endophyte is concentrated. There is still endophyte in the rest of the plant. Also, some cows never do adapt to KY31 fescue, others appear to not be bothered at all. It takes about 2 years on fescue for a cow to adapt to it and not look kind of ratty.

dun
 

western

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where abouts are you located Lead_dog?

Endophytes reach their peak levels when the plant is producing seed heads. You are always better off to use a non-endophyte variety.

Depending on where you are located you can interseed endophyte free fescue, orharchgrass, clovers etc... and that will help bring down the total overall endophyte levels. If you want to start over you can till under the fescue and plant a break crop like brassicas (turnips, etc...) This improve your chances of getting read of the endophyte + tall fescue. After you harvest (graze) the brassica you can plant your new pasture mix.
 
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lead_dog

lead_dog

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We're located in E. Georgia, near Athens. The plan is to either clip it or graze it closely in the fall, then frost seed durana in winter.
 

Outrigger2

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there is a fescue field day june 12th in watkinsville, ga. it should be very helpful explaining the ins and out of fescue. it's from 5-8pm, and food will be served
 

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